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Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie


Price: $6.72 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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Audio CD, November 3, 1998
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Music

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Biography

On her new album Havoc and Bright Lights, Alanis Morissette distills her entire body of work into its closing track “Edge of Evolution.” “…we’re ready to push envelopes into full-blown consciousness,” she declares in the final verse. “The evolution of our consciousness can be such a lofty, overly heady, and, frankly, confusing conversation for ... Read more in Amazon's Alanis Morissette Store

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Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie + Jagged Little Pill
Price for both: $11.01

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 3, 1998)
  • Original Release Date: 1998
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Maverick / Warner Bros
  • ASIN: B00000DGUG
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (813 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #27,006 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Front Row
2. Baba
3. Thank U
4. Are You Still Mad
5. Sympathetic Character
6. That I Would Be Good
7. The Couch
8. Can't Not
9. UR
10. I Was Hoping
11. One
12. Would Not Come
13. Unsent
14. So Pure
15. Joining You
16. Heart Of The House
17. Your Congratulations

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

When Alanis Morissette visited Mother India in 1997, she gained new composure and, in a state of numinous bliss, wrote 17 songs for Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie, each suffused with the search for enlightenment and self-knowledge. To the likely dismay of many fans, Morissette now rages at herself. But this long-awaited follow-up to 1995's record-smashing Jagged Little Pill is far from a disappointment. Imbued with dark, swirling psychedelic licks borrowed from Jimmy Page's song book, the disc is paradoxically both more enigmatic and revealing than Pill. And while Junkie shows that Morissette is no less stingy about revealing herself to her fans--her staccato stream-of-consciousness style is again employed to surrender her secrets and foibles a little too easily in these tales of abuse, lost love, and self-flagellation--Junkie also makes one wonder what this musical sphinx holds back. In "Baba" she takes on competitive spirituality, sneering at the fashionable grasp for enlightenment. "Would Not Come" returns to a similar theme--taking us on a tour of her diary. "Would Not Come" and "Your House" offer the only hints of sexual innuendo. The only revenge she wreaks on an errant lover is in the percussive "Are You Still Mad," this time dishing up a much subtler payback than on "You Oughta Know." The record's standouts, meanwhile, are "Thank U" and the hip-poppy "So Pure." One complaint (and there is only one): Morissette's rapid-fire wordplay is at times engulfed by ponderous instrumentation. The worldbeat rhythms and elaborate guitar play add fresh twists to the album, but they also sometimes bury her message. --Jaan Uhelszki

Product Description

Certified triple platinum by the RIAA. (12/98)

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Busy Body on July 6, 2003
Format: Audio CD
When Alanis Morissette released her breakthrough album in 1995, "Jagged Little Pill," practically the whole world stopped and watched this angst-ridden vixen whine to us. The album, in other words, was a phenomenal success. It sold near to 30 million units worldwide, and topped the UK album charts for 21 weeks over the course of two years while spawning some massive international hit singles. Three years passed between the release of this masterpiece, and expectations were extremely high for the follow up. It arrived in November 1998, and was titled "Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie."

So did it impress the public? Well, no. The album sold a mere 7 million copies - a significant drop from the previous release, but the fact remains that here we have a truly classic record. While Jagged Little Pill often lashed out in an angry state, Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie is more about reconciliation - with her lovers, friends, parents, and with herself.

The album opens with the amazing two songs "Front Row" and "Baba." The former is an excellent opener, and an album highlight. The song has a catchy beat and some very thought-provoking lyrics, with a brilliant chorus which really hightens your spirits. The latter is an even better song, in which Alanis sings about the stupid cult followings that gather to connect with so-called higher spirits and other-worldy beings. "I've seen them coming to line up from Switzerland and America," she sings in an angry vocal attack. The beat is crunky and rusty, and this gives off an old and grand rock feel. The final minute of the song consists of Alanis wailing "Ave Maria" constantly, to stunning effect. "Thank U," the album's lead single, is one of Alanis' personal favourites.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By scruniel on October 28, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Alanis has come up with another SPECTACULAR album!! Some people say that "SFIJ" isn't as good as Alanis' last album, "Jagged Little Pill", but I reckon it's HEAPS better! At first I didn't like the album, but then I just kept listening to it and now I love it!! My advice to people who don't like this album at first is keep listening to it, and you will eventually love it as much as I do!!
PS. Don't expect too much of the "Uninvited" Demo: it's only Alanis singing with a piano. You're better off buying the "City Of Angels" soundtrack so you can have the real version complete with all of the instruments!!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 3, 2004
Format: Audio CD
By the fall of 1998, music was headed towards a place everyone had long since left for dead. The Spice Girls, while a short-lived phenomenon, had re-introduced catchy meaningless songs. N Sync and the Backstreet Boys were riding high on the charts, and Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera were just around the corner. So for many rock fans, the only shining light on the horizon was the anticipated release of Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie, the much-hyped second album from superstar Alanis Morissette. Jagged Little Pill had sold 16 million copies at this point, and so the stakes were high. Could Alanis do it again?

Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie begins with the uptempo track Front Row. It's an example of what the listener will come to find on the album. It's wordy, only moderately catchy, and doesn't make sense, as it's Alanis' life. That being said, it might be the best song on the album. It's beat is oddly hypnotizing, and the lyrics are fun to listen to. Following that is Baba. It's a rock track that attacks the gurus that came into style around the time the record came out. It's not coded. It works well and it all comes together to make a great song. The third song is Thank U. This was the first single. It rose up the charts very quickly. And with good reason. The repetitive lyrics are somewhat predictable, but it's the catchiest song here. Up next is Are You Still Mad. We can only assume that the man in question is the cheater that inspired You Oughta Know. It seems evenhanded. She says sorry for being demanding, but then she apologizes for being more successful. It's left for the listener to decide. After this is Sympathetic Character. It's a dark song.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Josapheen on March 12, 2003
Format: Audio CD
When you've hit `play' you are immediately greeted with a demonic warbling, as the opening track is a dark one, obscure, that sticks in any listener's head due to the distinctive and varied background beat. This opener is the first part of the story and it reflects Alanis' state of mind at this stage in her life. For `Jagged Little Pill' fans, (Alanis' debut album) be warned: this is nothing like any of Alanis' previous work or indeed like anything you've ever heard before. Her voice is more mature, as if it has ripened over the years and is technically very good as the range of pitches varies greatly. It is finely tuned but the song itself is openly jarring:
"Slid into the ditch/ I have this overwhelming loss of ambition/
we said let's name thirty good reasons/ why we shouldn't be together/
I started by saying things like "you smoke" "you live in New Jersey (too far)"
It's starts off as a conventional lyric and song but ends up rather like `I was Hoping'. I think this refers to her partner at the time (surprise, surprise) and how much she didn't want to break up with him.
However she makes no mistake; this album is very listenable due to her distinctive style. As the first track concludes, you realise this is something original to taste. This feeling continues throughout the album as Alanis constantly plys the listener with estranged tracks that are totally and thoroughly related to her.
It is Alanis' second co-produced album with seventeen characteristic self-penned tracks. This was no easy feat for Morissette, as fans had to eagerly wait two years before it was completed. This album allows self-doubt to get a look in; it is not commercial in the least, as was JLP, but it doesn't need to be for the intelligent listener.
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