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Supreme Myths: Why the Supreme Court Is Not a Court and Its Justices Are Not Judges Hardcover – February 22, 2012

6 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0313396878 ISBN-10: 0313396876

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Editorial Reviews

Review

• Presents a novel perspective on the way the Supreme Court decides constitutional cases

• Addresses complicated constitutional law issues such as abortion and affirmative action and demystifies for the lay reader how the Court has handled these and other controversial issues

• Explains why the U.S. Supreme Court acts much more like an ultimate veto council rather than a true court

• Persuasively argues that life tenure for Supreme Court Justices is a terrible mistake



"This book is well-written, and tells background stories about several cases that may be of interest to students and some professors. . . . Supreme Myths may be a good book for undergraduates studying American government, judicial process, or constitutional law. Summing Up: Recommended."

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Review

"Supreme Myths is a tough-minded examination of the Supreme Court's record in deciding constitutional cases. Segall argues that the Court falsely claims to be relying on traditional legal authority like text and precedent. Clearly written and uncompromising." (Robert F. Nagel, Rothgerber Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Colorado Law School. Author of Unrestrained: Judicial Excess and the Mind of the American Lawyer (Transaction, 2008))
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 219 pages
  • Publisher: Praeger (February 22, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0313396876
  • ISBN-13: 978-0313396878
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.8 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #453,296 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ph03n1x on January 16, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Professor Eric Segall's book is an educating and eye-opening read to how our Court actually operates. It is apparent that Segall knows the material; he was able to repeatedly demonstrate how the Justices are not as judicial as they should be and provided good proposals as to how the Court could change for the better. I highly recommend this book to anyone (whether it is a gift for a lawyerly friend or for their own reading collection) who wants to know more about the Supreme Court, whether they are looking for a synopsis on any of the current controversial issues or for a compelling argument on why the decisions are so often 5-4 with the Justices almost always grouping together. Well done and well written.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Terry Jennrich on February 1, 2014
Format: Hardcover
As an attorney, I loved reading this book, and I agree with his assessment of the problem and the fact that the U.S. Supreme Court does not act like a real court, but makes its decisions based upon the poltical values of its membership. However, to some extent, that has always been the case, and it is not necessarily bad, but looked at in pure theory of how a court ought to operate such conduct creates bad law which leads to scary precedents.
However, I disagree with the author's proposed solution to the problem. I do agree with his idea that we should put a limit on the length of time they justices serve on the Sup Ct ,but I would prefer we elect 5 of the 9 judges in 5 regions of the country for seven year terms with a 3 term limit on service and allow the supreme court to elect its own Chief judge. I also think we should call them judges not justices. And I think the supreme court judges should be required to observe the original intent of the framers when making decisions where possible[ if acertainable]. And the judges in election or Senate confrimation should be required to explain their personal values and political beliefs and indicate how they may vote on major issues of the day. THey should not be bound by their statements [they might change their mind upon further reflection when a case is before them], but to let them get away by dodging the policy issues that currently passes for a confirmation hearing is a farce and diminishes both the Senate's duty to advise and consent and the nominee's credibitlity as a potential justice or judge. Clearly not what the framers had in mind.
terry jennrich
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jan Cornelius on October 18, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The author presents a readable, compelling case for his thesis that the Court is seriously flawed, and provides reasonable suggestions for fixing it.
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