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Frequently Bought Together

How to Survive (and Perhaps Thrive) on a Teacher's Salary + A Simple Book of Financial Wisdom: Teach Yourself (and Your Kids) How to Live Wealthy with Little Money + The Cheapskate Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of Americans Living Happily Below Their Means
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 88 pages
  • Publisher: Tate Publishing & Enterprises (October 23, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1598869027
  • ISBN-13: 978-1598869026
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 5.3 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 1.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #513,294 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Danny Kofke is currently a special education teacher in Georgia. His love of teaching and personal finance led him to write two books - "How To Survive (and perhaps thrive) On A Teacher's Salary" (Tate Publishing Co. OCT 2007) and A Simple Book Of Financial Wisdom: Teach Yourself (and your kids) How To Live Wealthy With Little Money" (Wyatt-MacKenzie SEP 2011).

Danny has been featured on numerous television shows including The CBS Early Show, Fox & Friends, CNN's Newsroom, The 700 Club, Fox News Channel's Happening Now, CNN's Your Bottom Line, Fox Business Network's Follow The Money, ABC News Now, FOX Business Network's Varney & Company, HLN's The Clark Howard Show and MSNBC Live. In addition, Danny has been interviewed on over 400 radio shows and featured in a number of publications including USA Today, Yahoo.com, Money Magazine, Bankrate.com, Parade, Instructor Magazine,The Atlanta Journal Constitution, USA Weekend, The Wall Street Journal, ABCNews.com, Yahoo Finance, Woman's Day, Consumer's Digest, Bottom Line Personal, Your Family Today and The Huffington Post.

Many think that figuring out financial matters and investing are difficult and are intimidated by it. Danny wants to show others that if this 38-year-old school teacher can figure it out then they can too. To learn more about Danny please visit dannykofke.blogspot.com.

Customer Reviews

1.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
Maybe I should write a book.
GA Teacher
There isn't any magic to personal finance that someone can tell you about.
George
Danny did NOT live on a single teachers salary.
M. Pierce

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

128 of 135 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
Don't buy this book for the simple reason that the author doesn't "survive on a teacher's salary", according to his own narrative.

Most of the time period covered in this short book, the author "survives" on two teachers' salaries because his wife also works. In addition to their two-teacher income, they earn money on the side by tutoring and working for relatives. In a few brief periods when one of them was not teaching full-time, they received money for teaching part time, keeping someone's child in their home and collecting disability. There are loans from grandma and a home improvement loan to supplement their income. The fact of the matter is that Danny and his wife are rarely without additional streams of income. At one point, Danny leaves teaching altogether for a more lucrative job selling flooring. At the end of the book, Danny goes back to teaching.

So what does Danny teach us about surviving on a teacher's salary? Never rely on a teacher's salary. Have two...and then tutor on the side. Work for relatives and friends as well. Sell a house. Borrow money from grandma. Collect disability. Work part-time. Publish and sell a book. This is how Danny does it.

To end on a slightly more favorable note, Danny does some smart things with his money which are worth emulating but you don't have to buy his book to learn how to do them. Danny suggests his readers check out books by David Bach. I would add that you look to Dave Ramsey and Larry Burkett.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Old Teacher on March 27, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was not worth the money I spent on it. It was a narrative of the author's experience. It was misleading. There were times when it was about 2 teacher's salaries and 3 times his grandma lent him money. I think he will do well in sales because of the title but will disappoint many buyers. The author will add to his savings but poor teachers will be conned out of $13.00 for a book that has no practical use for them.
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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin Easley on January 30, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
Despite my initial reservations, I chose to purchase this quick read in pursuit of practical advice to achieve my personal goals of supporting my future family on a teacher's salary.

Unfortunately, I must admit that Mr. Mangrum is spot-on is his assessment of this ten-dollar waste.

Over the course of eighty-four pages, Mr. Kofke writes with poor precision, abandons his own commitment to "survive (and perhaps thrive)" on such a salary, and offers the occasional money-saving suggestion of an ethically questionable nature:

In one such example, the author and his wife manipulate their disability insurance to escape $2,293.33 of a $2,318.50 hospital bill following the birth of their first daughter.

The book's greatest worth lies in the author's references to financial literature by David Bach. Personally, I would recommend investing $9.99 in Dave Ramsey's The Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness ($17.99 on this site). Dave offers direct, biblical, effective, "proven" (as the book states) financial advice that would serve a working man well in any profession.

For the record, I do appreciate Mr. Kofke's contribution to the understaffed field of special education...

...but I beg you to refrain from adding his book to your cart. Tate Publishing should be ashamed for endorsing such literature.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By M. Pierce on March 17, 2010
Format: Paperback
I am so disappointed after reading this short ebook. The things that the other reviewers mentioned are spot on. Danny did NOT live on a single teachers salary. He always had rich ole grandma around to bank roll him. For most people starting out is the hard part but when you get rich family members to loan you money for free that makes your starting out significantly easier. Him and his wife almost always had multiple sources of income which made their meager life work which I found disappointing. Also I was SHOCKED that Danny left teaching for the almighty dollar! What a sellout. While this "book" does give some basic good financial information is DOES NOT tell you how to survive on a single teachers salary.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By GA Teacher on April 3, 2011
Format: Paperback
I checked this book out from my local library. It was in the local authors section, and I'm a teacher in Georgia- so I thought I'd give it a look since it is a very quick read. I wanted to write a review so that people who are considering a purchase will not do so. Sorry to the author-- I know you are just trying to make a few extra bucks to support your family, but your book is not helpful to teachers who did not come from am upper middle class family and have as many lucky breaks as you did. Why did you write a book? Your experiences were not special in any way. You came from a middle class family that could afford to help you out when needed, and you've managaged to work a few side jobs and have a reasonable budget. There is nothing new or exciting about any of that. In fact, the writing is pretty boring. Maybe I should write a book.

Unfortunately, this book appears to have been written just before the economy went south. The author is very lucky to have graduated in time to have a few years under his belt before new teachers began being laid off in droves. He is also incredibly lucky to have come from an upper middle class home. He worked for his dad as a teenager (whereas these days unemployment for teens who want to work is very high since older people who are out of work are going after the jobs that used to be occupied by high school students). His father in law got them a discount on a new car. He and his wife were able to make a huge profit on their house in Florida before the recession hit and now there are many homes in foreclosures and houses are selling for much, much less than they were "worth" a few years ago. They sold their house within a few hours of putting it on the market! That doesn't happen anymore, sorry.
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