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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worst Case Stories, Depressing, But Relevant
Disclosure: the publisher sent me this book after asking for permission to do so, and I agreed to read and review the book. Then I got a job that took me overseas and I am just now catching up with my commitment on this specific book.

First off, this is the most comprehensive treatment I have ever seen and the typology that the author developed is...
Published on May 6, 2010 by Robert David STEELE Vivas

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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Are you kidding me?
I am so sorry I bought this book. The first few chapters kept telling me what this book was going to do for me. I felt like I was reading one of those ads you see that keep going and going -- but wait there's more! I actually felt like I was reading a book report. It's very 101 and more an introduction to the real world than an actual book about surviving in it. The...
Published on May 1, 2010 by The Coat Lady


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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Are you kidding me?, May 1, 2010
I am so sorry I bought this book. The first few chapters kept telling me what this book was going to do for me. I felt like I was reading one of those ads you see that keep going and going -- but wait there's more! I actually felt like I was reading a book report. It's very 101 and more an introduction to the real world than an actual book about surviving in it. The author assumes the reader knows absolutely nothing about people and has reduced personality types into general caricatures. Most of the scenarios/solutions for dealing with difficult co-workers sound ridiculous and are out of touch with reality. If someone approached me in many of the ways that the author suggests, I'd think "office busybody". I think it contains a lot of bad advice. There have got to be better books out there on this subject. Ugh. I hate when this happens. That's why I try to go to the library and not the bookstore.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sounds good on paper, but.., June 28, 2011
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This book sounds like it would make a great book for someone responsible for the behavior of office employees. However, as a book for "all of us" this title falls flat on its face.

Reading through the book, it is very clear that the suggested conversations with trouble employees come from a position of authority. If you or I were to try this with someone on an equal footing, the other person would be left saying "who the Heck does he/she think they are?" If used in the way the author instructs, the person would likely alienate themselves quickly.

A better book for THIS topic of peer to peer or peer and peer to superior interactions would be Dirty Tricks at Work. However, that book is more into the politicking aspect and less of the everyday small stuff that we might commonly identify as counter-productive to the office environment.

Still, I can completely see this book as being useful to people in a superior position of leadership who get to "lay down the law". For them, this book will likely be very useful. For the rest of us, however, we will have to keep on looking.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is not even worth 1 Star! It's awful, December 11, 2010
By 
No Name (California, USA) - See all my reviews
This book abruptly makes fun of people with severe chemical sensitivity. The author literally makes these people look like caricatures. For people with chemical sensitivity, the dear author calls them "delicate flowers" and says that "people at work do not have to change their style for delicate flowers; Delicate flowers can just go and get themselves treated or work from home". After reading this I was like "What the heck?" Well, I am not so chemically sensitive but if someone literally sprays a perfume on my face yea, I will get a bad attack and would need to be hospitalised. And this guy at my work literally did that --> spray perfume right on my face. Now it is very ruthless of this author to openly support people who are not chemically sensitive as opposed to people who are and sideline people by calling them "delicate flowers" and reducing them to caricatures! This whole book does the same job - characterises everyone into a mold and gives them nicknames. It's a shame. It's really the worst and most disgusting book written for bad/problem workplaces!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible, July 6, 2013
The solution to just about every problem in this book is apparently to threaten to go to HR. Whether your coworker talks too loudly, interrupts you too often, doesn't socialize enough or engages in any one of a myriad of ways that any normal person would learn to deal with during the process of learning to work with others, the author of this book instead recommends writing a sternly worded email demanding the reader comply, with a threat to go to HR if they don't. In the case of the loud talker, she wanted him to be quiet whenever she put a finger to her lips, otherwise off to HR we go!

Following the advice in this book is guaranteed to sabotage professional relationships and make the workplace even more toxic.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worst Case Stories, Depressing, But Relevant, May 6, 2010
Disclosure: the publisher sent me this book after asking for permission to do so, and I agreed to read and review the book. Then I got a job that took me overseas and I am just now catching up with my commitment on this specific book.

First off, this is the most comprehensive treatment I have ever seen and the typology that the author developed is very--VERY--scary on multiple levels, including recognizing myself in multiple categories including Socially Clueless, Angry, Rescuer, and Obsessives. Bummer.

I found the book absorbing. Although each "chapter" is really closer to a four-page blurb, there is nothing wrong with the typology, the substance, or the intentions of this book.

At best it should make most people grateful they do not work in a toxic environment. At worst it could be a wake-up call for those who have put up with extraordinary abuse, have come to think of it as normal, and might find this checklist approach to toxic environments helpful.

For me the best part of the book was the end where the author itemizes a number of class action law suits that have led to big wins for some groups, but sadly only have decades of litigation and decades of loss.

The stark reality is that both governments and corporations have forgotten that their mission includes the nurturing of their employees and the communities that host their offices. Ethics has gone down the tubes, and corruption at all levels is the norm. From where I sit, the healthiest route right now is to simply disconnect, move to Seattle, or Portland, or Alaska, and start over. If on the other hand you are a CEO, are being "born again" and want to get it right, then this book is a good introduction to the professional that can help your company get back on the right side of goodness.

Some other equally depressing books:
Rage of the Random Actor: Disarming Catastrophic Acts And Restoring Lives
The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans Are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead
Screwed: The Undeclared War Against the Middle Class - And What We Can Do about It (BK Currents (Paperback))
The Working Poor: Invisible in America
The Global Class War: How America's Bipartisan Elite Lost Our Future - and What It Will Take to Win It Back

On the bright side:
Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny
Emergence: The Shift from Ego to Essence
Reflections on Evolutionary Activism: Essays, poems and prayers from an emerging field of sacred social change
Revolutionary Wealth
Collective Intelligence: Creating a Prosperous World at Peace
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An indispenable book for the job!, June 6, 2010
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The book offers indispensable advice on dealing with all types of difficult co-workers and supervisors. If you are having a tough time with an individual at work, the book spells out the type of the difficult individual involved and what to do when the individual makes one feels uneasy or even blatant outright harassment. I would advise this book to anyone who is employed at any job (applies for both private and government jobs; small and large businesses alike).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, May 1, 2013
I did not find useful information in the book to address the toxic situation at my workplace. Perhaps those in their first job will find it helpful, but I found the information superficial & generic.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars BROAD BRUSH STROKES WITH COMPLETE COVERAGE, October 5, 2011
Surviving The Toxic Workspace - Dr Linnda Durre`s necessarily concise work (there is a need to get to the point simply and quickly in these circumstances) is painted with a relatively broad brush - of course it is. We are not fools - we can all identify the character types approximating to co-workers that can make our lives a misery on a daily basis - and we can adapt the suggested responses to our own circumstances and make the appropriate conceptual leaps. I think some earlier (rather negative) reviews rather miss the point. This book shows that there IS something that can be done - if it can help encourage just ONE person (and that person could one day be YOU) to end their unnecessary suffering in the workspace (and I strongly suggest that it can!) then it has a valuable contribution to make. Well done Dr Durre!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, October 15, 2012
This book does an excellent job at explaining the dynamics of a work environment in a way that is easy to understand and even easier to relate to. I recommend this book to anyone involved in HR or looking to better succeed in the work place.

Bravo!
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just a book about the workplace -- it's a book about life, March 7, 2010
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We often feel very alone -- and very helpless -- when a difficult boss or coworker creates tension in the office or even makes it impossible to do our jobs. Linnda Durre's "Surviving the Toxic Workplace," however, shows us how wrong that perception is.

With pinpoint precision, Durre lays out every imaginable workplace personality, the factors that drive their behavior, and exactly what to do to improve your relationship with them. From "Bonnie the Bossy One" to "Donald the Dealmaker" to "Vicki the Victim," the descriptions of these types of officemates resonate with everyday experiences. They're also laugh-out-loud funny, in many circumstances, and guide the reader step-by-step how to deal with colleagues' weaknesses while also complimenting their strengths.

Most impressive about Durre's book is how easily its advice transfers to "real life" situations that have nothing to do with work. These difficult personalities can be found among acquaintances, friends and family members alike. How many times do we encounter "Viola the Verbal Attacker" around the Thanksgiving dinner table? Or "Monty the Money Borrower" at a summertime family reunion? Even our own siblings or parents can be "Pam the Passive-Agressive" or "Ben the Brownnoser!"

"Surviving the Toxic Workplace" will help you survive the game of life -- it's a must-read.
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