Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $4.58 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by RentU
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Fast shipping from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime Shipping and FREE standard shipping for orders over $35. Overnight, 2 day and International shipping available! Excellent Customer Service.. May not include supplements such as CD, access code or DVD.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $3.17
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Suspect Relations: Sex, Race, and Resistance in Colonial North Carolina Paperback – November 15, 2001


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$79.76
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.37
$19.96 $10.95
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Suspect Relations: Sex, Race, and Resistance in Colonial North Carolina + The Slave Ship: A Human History + The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America
Price for all three: $46.83

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press (November 15, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801486793
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801486791
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #58,855 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Scholars now understand that ideas about class, gender, and race are products of particular historical contexts. . . . Constructions of racial difference are most successful when they appear to be both natural and immutable. Fischer's Suspect Relations describes how law and social practice made them increasingly so in early North Carolina, providing a fascinating perspective on the colony's evolution from a disorderly society to a more ordered one, from one in which hierarchies of class, race,and gender were inchoate to one in which they were all increasingly entrenched."—Cynthia A. Kierner, University of North Carolina. North Carolina Historical Review, Vol. LXXIX, No. 3, July 2002

"With this book, Kirsten Fischer joins scholars who have demonstrated the interconnection of race and gender in the evolving social hierarchy of the early South. . . . Because she skillfully weaves together questions of class, race, gender, sexuality, and the social order, her book should be read by scholars of all related fields."—C. Dallett Hemphill, Ursinus College. The Journal of American History, March 2003

"Most impressive is Fischer's ability to shed light on a world in which all of our usual categories- race, status, politics, and power- were in flux. This historical creativity, as well as the book's contributions to the study of race and sexuality in a little-studied early American colony, will make it a good volume for graduate classes and advanced undergraduates."—Carolyn Eastman, Reviews in American History, Vol. 31, No. 3, Sept '03

"Beginning with a sketch of Anglican (English) ideas of race and sex in the seventeenth century and the ways that North Carolina women were perceived as disrupting society, Fischer subsequently discusses cross-cultural sex, regulation of sexuality (especially of servants), defamation suits, and violence (including rape)."—Joan R. Gundersen, Journal of Southern History 69:4, November 2003

"Lively as well as erudite, Suspect Relations provides a telling portrait which is both fully examined and sharply rendered. Fischer unerringly illuminates dark recesses of the colonial era, and suggests their relevance to some vexing social issues of today."—Virginia Quarterly Review 78:4

"Fischer's thoroughly researched, well-argued, and engaging book helps to nuance and expand our understanding of social relations and the construction of race ideology in the colonial South."—Sylvia D. Hoffert, Comparative Studies in Society and History, 45:1, January 2003

"Suspect Relations is an important contribution to contemporary discussion of the origins of race as a category, an assumed 'physical fact,'in the American colonies. Fischer places bodies at the center of this progression; ordinary men and women struggled to maintain control over their bodies as those in authority drew lines on and around them, and racialized demarcation was the result."—Karen Ordahl Kupperman

"This is a great book: deeply researched, clearly written, historiographically important. More than any previous historian, Kirsten Fischer has managed to chart the back-and-forth development of ideas of racial difference and sexual order. By treating questions of property rights and labor alongside those of gender and sexuality, she has deepened our understanding of the daily dimensions of each."—Walter Johnson, author of Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market

From the Back Cover

"Suspect Relations is an important contribution to the contemporary discussion of the origins of race as a category, an assumed 'physical fact,' in the American colonies." Karen Ordahl Kupperman --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Kirstin Fischer, in her book Suspect Relations, has offered the reader an intriguing portrait of racial relations in colonial North Carolina based on sex.

Many readers will treat the concept of sex and race with some suspicion; how can these two items be related unless you're talking (much like Foucault) about power? Fischer certainly does talk about power relationships, but she focuses on gender and social responses to sexual behaviors to construct her argument about creating the definition of "race".

Fischer has mined lower court records to garner an understanding about societal responses in this era to sexual behaviors, including deviance. She breaks this down into 5 well crafted chapters, each focusing on a different aspect of racial/gender relations.

Her chapters cover the gamut, from rebellious women to slaveowners engaging in sexual relations with their slaves to craft her argument. In the end, she claims that race is a biological construct defined by sexual behaviors. It is an interesting argument, and usually supported well by her evidence.

The one problem I had with this book is that we have no idea how widespread some of the cases she cites are. The evidence she provides is for a few individual scenarios, but she does not really put this into context of the entire population in most cases. Despite this drawback, the argument is compelling and the book is well worth reading for anyone that has an interest in 18th century America.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By KDenn on January 30, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's a great book, both historically and story. It was very entertaining and thought-provoking. Great condition w/only a few pages of highlighting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By P. Johnson on June 26, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Read this for a 400 level history class. I gave it 4 stars, not b/c I loved reading it, after all I don't really care about gender adn sexual history very much, but it was well researched and well written. The author was a bit repetitive and it could have been a number of pages shorter as a result, but the information that is inhere is good and documneted. While the author tries to draw clear conclusions, she is only looking at it from one point of view adn there is plenty of debate to be had on the importance of these histories.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 6 people found the following review helpful By wquai on September 27, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The product came in a week and a half after I placed the order. It is a brand new book bought at a very low price. The price could not be compared to the bookstores.
The book arrived in a good condition, no flaws. I am very happy with the product.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again