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Sustainability and Cities: Overcoming Automobile Dependence Paperback – February 1, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-1559636605 ISBN-10: 1559636602 Edition: 4th

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Island Press; 4 edition (February 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1559636602
  • ISBN-13: 978-1559636605
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1.3 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,568,093 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Peter Newman is associate professor of city policy and director of the Institute for Science and Technology Policy at Murdoch University in Perth, Australia and visiting professor of city and regional planning at the University of Pennsylvania.

Jeffrey Kenworthy is senior lecturer in urban environments at Murdoch University and is currently visiting professor at the University of Colorado in Boulder. They are co-authors of Cities and Automobile Dependence and Winning Back the Cities.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By s.j.baddeley@bham.ac.uk on November 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
In "The Life and Death of Great American Cities" written in the 1960s Jane Jacobs embraced complexity as a goal in itself. "How" she asked "can cities generate enough mixture among uses, enough diversity throughout enough of their territories, to sustain their own civilisation?" For Newman and Kenworthy the key idea is sustainability - "one of the most diversely applied concepts among academics and professionals discussing the future..." that "...has cut across all disciplines and professions and has developed many complexities." The car enters Newman and Kenworthy's consideration as a technology of widening individual choice. Why then is the car not the transport technology, par excellence? What unintended consequence has meant its proliferation has blighted the very thing it might have been expected to nurture?
Newman and Kenworthy argue that the car, unlike public transport, offered people who could afford it freedom to live anywhere in a city and get quickly to any other part of it. It appeared to remove the need to plan land-use. Anything could be built anywhere with drivers determining their own routes to and from home to work, shops, schools and entertainment. In the "car-city" - which Newman and Kenworthy distinguish from the "pedestrian city" and the "transit city" - it is possible to develop in any direction and not just along rivers, tramlines or railways. Dispersed low density housing becomes accessible and popular. Town planners can separate residential from industrial zones accelerating decentralisation. Public and commercial buildings no longer need to cluster as a product of the convergence of private and public investment in a particular place.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Maria Attard on March 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book has provided a clear insight on sustainable transport strategies and policies which have been adopted in different countries. It is very well explained and I must say that it is the best piece the authors have actually written. It amalgamates the previous work carried out by the authors and therefore is an excellent reference book, which should be present in every transport planner's shelf and in every university.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
A must-read for city planners, environmentalists, urban policymakers, and all those generally concerned with "smart growth," sustainability and a vision for the 21st century. Newman and Kenworthy make a clear case for the rethinking of our current pattern of development and why it just doesn't make sense. They offer an alternative pattern that is not only achievable, but attractive. Their study of global cities throughout the US, Canada, Europe, Asia, and Australia is clear and conclusive. And their vision is inspiring. American cities are making their comeback based on many of the principles expressed here. Read this book and share it with all those you know!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Explains the issue at hand in a descriptive yet easy to follow manner.

Should be able to cater for a wide audience of city planners, transport engineers, environmentalists and others interested in sustainable cities.

Recommended as a must-have for own shelf or office library!
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