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Sustainable Nuclear Power (Sustainable World) Hardcover – December 22, 2006

ISBN-13: 000-0123706025 ISBN-10: 0123706025 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: Sustainable World
  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Academic Press; 1 edition (December 22, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0123706025
  • ISBN-13: 978-0123706027
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,654,444 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This book is designed to provide nonnuclear engineers, scientist, and energy planers with the necessary information to understand and utilize the major advances in the field of nuclear power. The book demonstrates that nuclear fission technology has the abundance and attainability to provide centuries of safe power with minimal greenhouse gas generation.-Nuclear News, February 2007

Book Description

Provides non-nuclear engineers and scientists with essential knowledge about the potential of nuclear power

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul on May 4, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I wrote "authorship" above, but perhaps it should be "editorship," since Suppes and Storvick are listed on the title page as "Editors." However, no other authors are acknowledged in the preface nor listed on the first pages of chapters, so I assume the title-page listing simply represents another example of the collapse of corporate-level editing during book production. Academic Press is by no means alone on this!

I'm a PhD physicist, so I presumably have a better shot at understanding a book like this than do most of the intended audience, which the back cover lists as "engineers, scientists, and energy professionals." For laypeople, this book is a no-hoper.

There's definitely interesting and important material in the book. The authors (editors?) invite the reader to regard the book as a collection of free-standing chapters, so I skipped around and didn't slavishly read everything.

The two best parts, substantively, are their discussion about how U.S. transportation could be largely electrified -- no, not through electric trains and buses but via plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) with battery range matched to typical trips -- and their description of how the nuclear fuel cycle could be improved by a large factor, probably 10 to 50 times. I'd say these two topics also constitute the core of the book.

Improvement of the nuclear fuel cycle means processing of spent reactor fuel rods to remove the small percentage of fission products that constitute true waste -- the stuff that really needs to be sequestered from the biosphere for hundreds or thousands of centuries. Most of the "spent" fuel rods consist of still-usable uranium 238, uranium 235, and plutonium 239.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DanRankin on April 30, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I have adored this book from the first two pages. It is not overly technical, though its a great leaping off point to break into the basics. I have a BS in Applied Physics myself and energy is an interest of mine. The matter a fact view of things is very appreciated, and though it can be a thick read a times, its never too much, and if the chapters topic isn't extremely interesting to you, move on to the next.

It provides an excellent series of points that effectively says that until we have viable, cheap alternatives, nuclear is our best bet. Chapters 3 and 9 were particularly enlightening.

Its going to be a light read for someone in the field already, but it really takes you step by step, which is why there is a lot of non nuclear commentary (eg. a history of energy).
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The book is largeley non technical and devotes a lot of space to economic considerations and non nuclear energy sources. It presents a solid arguement for fuel reprocessing and reactor technology updating to provide an energy source for millenia. Engineers however are not at their best when writing about economics.
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