Qty:1
  • List Price: $6.99
  • Save: $1.28 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book has already been well loved by someone else and that love shows. It MIGHT have highlighting, underlining, be missing a dust jacket, or SLIGHT water damage, but over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Swamp Angel Paperback – January 1, 2000


See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$5.71
$3.61 $0.01
Audio CD
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Swamp Angel + Thunder Rose + Mike Fink
Price for all three: $20.25

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Children's Christmas Books
Visit the Children's Christmas Bookstore to find stories about Santa and his reindeer, cozy books to read by the fire, and sweet stories about family celebrations.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 3
  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin; Reprint edition (January 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140559086
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140559088
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 0.1 x 12 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #213,556 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

On the day of her birth, nothing about Angelica Longrider suggested that she would one day become the greatest woodswoman of Tennessee. In fact, the newborn was "scarcely taller than her mother and couldn't climb a tree without help." It's not long, though, before Angelica is vanquishing varmints such as Thundering Tarnation, a huge bear with a taste for settlers' winter rations, and swallowing entire lakes in a gulp.

This tallest of tall tales is an original from an intriguing newcomer to children's books, Anne Isaacs. In the tradition of Paul Bunyan and Pecos Bill, the story of a self-sufficient, tornado-wielding, unflappable heroine lopes along at a perfect pace. Paul O. Zelinsky's folksy oil illustrations are painted on cherry, maple, or birch veneers, with old-fashioned frames; the extravagant and fanciful paintings have garnered the distinguished illustrator yet another Caldecott Honor. (Zelinsky has already received one Caldecott Medal for Rapunzel and two Caldecott Honors for Hansel and Gretel and Rumpelstiltskin.) The dry and fantastically far-fetched humor of the author-illustrator team will make readers of all ages feel as though Angelica herself has tossed 'em in the air so high that they are still on the way up at nightfall. (Ages 4 and older) --Emilie Coulter --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Zelinsky's (Rumpelstiltskin) stunning American-primitive oil paintings, set against an unusual background of cherry, maple and birch veneers, frankly steal the show here. Their success, however, does not diminish the accomplishment of Isaacs, whose feisty tall tale marks an impressive picture-book debut. Her energy-charged narrative introduces Angelica Longrider. "On August 1, 1815," Isaacs begins, "when [she] took her first gulp of air on this earth, there was nothing about the baby to suggest that she would become the greatest woodswoman in Tennessee. The newborn was scarcely taller than her mother and couldn't climb a tree without help.... She was a full two years old before she built her first log cabin." The story continues in this casually overstated vein, explaining how Angelica got the appellation Swamp Angel at the age of 12 after rescuing a wagon train mired in the mud. But the larger-than-life girl's reputation grows to truly gargantuan proportions when she bests an even larger bear, throwing him up in the sky, where "he crashed into a pile of stars, making a lasting impression. You can still see him there, any clear night." This valiant heroine is certain to leave youngsters chuckling-and perhaps even keeping a close watch on the night sky. Ages 5-9.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

I recommend this book to all readers.
Kelly D.
The illustrations are so beautifully detailed that you can make up your own side stories on each page.
V. Jennings
This experience inspired Paul to point himself in the direction of children's books.
Mary in Naples

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Catherine S. Vodrey on May 5, 2002
Format: Hardcover
What fun to have a tall tale that features a woman--and such a capable woman at that! Anne Isaacs has written a yarn that seems somehow to have been in the pantheon all along--much like Howard Pyles' "Pepper and Salt" stories, "Swamp Angel" is new as far as children's stories go, but has all the elements of the classic stories and so seems older and as wonderfully distinctive as the tales that have been around for generations.
Isaacs tells us all about one red-headed, freckled young woman named Angelica Longrider. From the first, we know we are in for a wild ride when we see the picture of her rather startled-looking parents holding an enormous but contented baby--the text tells us calmly that Angelica was "scarcely taller than her mother and couldn't climb a tree without help." Things start moving at a pell-mell pace when we find out that a destructive black bear has so annoyed folks all around the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee that a reward has been offered for his hide. Angelica sets up to whup that bear and means to do the job right.
The fight between Angelica and the bear is a wondrous portion of the story, told with great good humor, a number of winks at the reader, and the astonishing illustrations of Paul O. Zelinsky. "Swamp Angel" may well be Zelinsky's masterpiece. The pictures have the flavor of early American folk art, combined to great effect with Zelinsky's usual eye for telling detail and gorgeous use of color. They fit the style of the story so well and complement the action so sufficiently that it's as though Isaacs and Zelinsky are two halves of the same person. Rarely do the visions of both author and illustrator dovetail as cleanly as they do here, and it's our great good luck as readers that Isaacs and Zelinsky found each other. Three cheers for "Swamp Angel!"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 4, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Swamp Angel is charming and hilarious. Words and pictures blend together to tell a wonderful tall tale of mythical proportions. It demands to be read out loud, preferably to a group of children or family and friends, with as much of an exaggerated hillbilly twang as the narrator can muster. Angelica Longrider, aka Swamp Angel, is reminiscent of Paul Bunyon in size and accomplishments, but is also feminine and feminist, making her a suitable heroine for impressionable young girls. Swamp Angel's conquest of the fierce, marauding giant bear, Thundering Tarnation, strikes one as a metaphor for the conquest of the wilderness by the pioneers of America. At the height of her conquest of the bear, Angelica praises its strength and tenacity. Above all, this book is a hoot to read, beautifully illustrated, and heralds an exciting new author on the childrens' book scene.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on December 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
A truly enjoyable folktale. With Paul Zelinsky's inventive and endlessly amusing illustrations, the book tells as well as it views. With sentences like, "Varmint, I'm much obliged for that pelt you're carryin'", Swamp Angel's showdown with the bear Thundering Tarnation is of epic proportions. Zelinsky has truly outdone himself in his portrayals of their fight. There are thousands of tiny illustrations hidden on each page for kids to discover and delight in. The fight itself is about good old-fashioned wrassling, and it's a joy to watch. Zelinsky painted his illustrations on actual wood veneer, hoping to give the book a folk-art feel of some sort. The result is a beautiful story that adults and kids will both enjoy. As I might have given away, I'm a fan. book could easily be paired with another tall tales, possibly that of the other gigantic hero Paul Bunyun or the great John Henry. Both would fit in well with this story, though Swamp Angel owes perhaps most of her telling to Pecos Bill more than anyone else.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kelly D. on February 21, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Angelica Longrider is known to the settlers of Tennessee as "Swamp Angel". She is a giant girl-turned-woman who helps settlers in need. A giant bear is eating all of the settlers' food and they cannot stop him. Swamp Angel grabs the bear and throws him into the sky, where his imprint can still be seen today as a constellation. He does not come back down, so Swamp Angel grabs a tornado and lassos the bear from the sky. The bear and Swamp Angel wrestle for many days and many nights. They even wrestle in their sleep. Swamp Angel snores so loudly that a tree falls down, killing the bear. The people rejoiced and ate many foods made from bear, including bear cake. Swamp Angel took the bear hide to Montana and lay it down like a rug. We now call that area Shortgrass Prairie. This story reminds me of a modern day Paul Bunyan. It is nice to have a tall tale with a female hero. The illustrations are unique and they add a lot to the story, showing things that Swamp Angel did that were not in the text. I recommend this book to all readers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Swamp Angel is a children's picture book that is written by Anne Isaacs and illustrated by Paul Zelinsky. Angelica Longrider is no ordinary child, she was very large. Even at birth, she was larger than her mother. Angelica grew to be even bigger and stronger and used these characteristics to help people who were in trouble. One day, she came across a wagon train that was stuck in Dejection Swamp. She lifted the train out of the bog, and the travelers said that Angelica was an angel. Ever since, the towns people called her Swamp Angel. Swamp Angel killed a bear, Thundering Tarnation, that the men in Tennessee could not kill although they tried. Swamp Angel could be considered a fable because the book has morals that can be drawn from the story. It is not like Aesop's fables, discussed by Maharg, because Aesop's fables taught lessons including "simple virtues like loyalty, patience, honesty." Swamp Angel contains lessons that is important in today's society. The lesson is that women can do anything they put their minds to; hence they are not required to stay home "mending a quilt" like the men in the story say to Angelica. Another moral that can be gathered from the story is that people with special traits and talents need to use them in positive ways. Angelica could have stayed at home upset that she was so large, but she set out and rescued other people from fires, bears, and the swamp. Pflieger says that "fables seem a natural choice for picture books..." "In picture books, the main characters in fables lose their anonymity and become more individual." Having illustrations helps the audience get involved in the plot of the story and understand exactly what the character looks.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?