Swastika Night Reprint Edition

12 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0935312560
ISBN-10: 0935312560
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $4.91
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
More Buying Choices
8 New from $60.12 14 Used from $18.73
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, January 1, 1993
"Please retry"
$60.12 $18.73
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


InterDesign Brand Store Awareness Textbooks

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

KATHARINE BURDEKIN (1896-1963) published more than ten novels. DAPHNE PATAI is professor of Brazilian literature and women’s studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY; Reprint edition (January 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0935312560
  • ISBN-13: 978-0935312560
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.6 x 7.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #136,519 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

KATHARINE BURDEKIN was born in England in 1896 and, often writing under the name Murray Constantine, published more than ten novels before her death in 1963. Several novels, including Proud Man (1934), The End of This Day's Business (1935), and Swastika Night (1937), have been reissued by the Feminist Press.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Cody Carlson VINE VOICE on November 15, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Katharine Burdekin's 1937 novel, 'Swastika Night,' is a rare work of science fiction that explores not only the evils of military totalitarianism, but also closely examines the realationship between the sexes. Over 700 years into the Hitlerian era Europe has become a fuedel society where Hitler is God, Christians are persecuted, and women are reduced to the status of animal breeders. A Nazi leader, the Knight von Hess, gives a disillusioned Englishman the greatest of gifts- a book written centuries before that tells the true story of world history and not the Hitler version that Germany accepts as gospel. It's easy to see the many similarities between 'Swastika Night' and George Orwell's '1984.' Both novels take place in a repressive, totalitarian society where a government leader deigns to help a member of the lower class. Also, the themes of massive nation-states in constant competition and degradaded womanhood make one wonder just how much Orwell 'borrowed' from Burdekin. What makes this novel truly amazing, however, is Burdekin's prediction of the horrors to come. She wrote of the comming war with Germany, predicting both the extermination of the Jews and the prolonged, devastating war in Russia. A wonderful work on many levels, 'Swastika Night' is more than just an entertaining novel, it's an important one.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on November 2, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Swastika Night" was published in 1937, although the fact that "Murray Constantine" was a pseudonym for Katharine Burdekin was not revealed until the early 1980s (Burdekin died in 1963). The chief interest in this dystopian novel was that Burdekin was telling the story of a feudal Europe that existed seven centuries into a world in which Hitler and the Nazi achieved total victory. The novel begins with a "knight" entering "the Holy Hitler chapel," where the faithful all sing the praise of "God the Thunderer" and: "His Son our Holy Adolf Hitler, the Only Man. Who was, not begotten, not born of a woman, but Exploded!" With such a beginning it is hard not to look at "Swastika Night" as a nightmarish version of the Germany and England that would result from a Nazi victory. Given the time in which she was writing, two years before Hitler's forces invaded Poland and officially began the Second World War, it is equally obvious that Burdekin is simultaneously an indictment of Hitler's political and militaristic policies and a warning of the logical consequences of the Nazi ideology.
Burdekin depicts a world that has been divided into the Nazi Empire (Europe and Africa) and the equally militaristic Japanese Empire (Asia, Australia, and the Americas), a demarcation that raises some interesting issues all by itself. Obviously in the Nazi Empire Hitler is venerated as a god and all books and documents from the past have been destroyed so that the Nazi version of history is all that remains (the similarity is more to the efforts of the ancient Egytpian pharoahs than Orwell's idea of the continuous revision of the public record).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
It was a real surprise to excavate this marvelous book. The book is a chilling future Dystopian vision. All those who have never read the book, and love _Brave New World_ or _1984_ should go for it!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Helmut von Seydlitz on January 23, 2012
Format: Paperback
I found this book in the bargain bin for a dollar and it was a dollar well spent! I personally just found the setting of this book to be very interesting. It takes place hundreds of years into Hitler's "Thousand Year Reich," which won the war in this alternate world. The entire world is under the dominion of either the German or Japanese empires, who rule feudal male-centered empires. Between the two empires, most of the history has been either forcibly forgotten or grotesquely manipulated to serve the fascist states.

The story takes place in Nazi Europe and mainly involves a British man on pilgrimage, a German serf, and a Nazi Knight. Between the three of them they delve into the lost world of the past and try to create a better future. The characters aren't evenly flushed out but that does serve the atmosphere of the book, that taking away men's(and women's) liberty takes something out of life.

Part of the reason that the book is so powerful is because it was written before the Second World War, when Hitler was still on the rise and there was no guarantee that Fascism would not spread across the world.

All in all it was an interesting read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Eric Campbell on December 31, 2001
Format: Paperback
A fascinating book on many levels. Burdekin wasn't afraid to tackle topics of religion and politics head on. If you like 'We' and '1984', you won't want to put this book down.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By runner30 on August 4, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Fascinating and horrifying ideas pertaining to "What if the Nazis had won?" set about 700 years after WWII. The extent to which Nazism (and maybe all modern tyrannies) depends on emotional response in place of thinking is well thought out here (as are other causes & effects). The book is especially startling given it was written in 1937 -- it anticipates there will be a Holocaust, an Axis attempt at world conquest, and that the cruelest fighting will occur in Russia. Unfortunately at least half the ideas here are presented in a long, multiple-chapter conversation between two characters. The actual story comes across as an afterthought, which prevents this from being a great book. Still, it is thought-provoking and startling, and worth a read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?