Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $1.49 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, US & Canada Ed. Paperback – December 3, 2007


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.46
$0.80 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, US & Canada Ed. + The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (Dover Thrift Editions)
Price for both: $17.75

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (December 3, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199543445
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199543441
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5 x 7.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #579,754 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert L. Mack is the author of Thomas Gray, A Life (Yale, 2000) and editor of The Arabian Nights' Entertainments and Oliver Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield for OWC.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
4
3 star
5
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 14 customer reviews
As for the annotations, I wish they were not in the back of the book.
T. L. Crabtree
The relationships between the characters weren't even the same, and I felt that although the story itself was good, I couldn't identify with it.
K. K. Jo
If you like the film, if you like films in general, if you like the cinema, this book is absolutely indispensible.
Jacques COULARDEAU

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Darren Sutton on December 7, 2007
Format: Paperback
I'm a huge Tim Burton and Johnny fan and can't wait for the movie to come out, and a friend of mine said the book was worth checking out.

The Verdict? The book was really spellbinding. The plot twists kept me guessing and I was anxious for the next page - and there was some lively humor in there too. It had a rich Gothic mood, like Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, yet was thrilling and a fast read. And unlike some 19th century stories, the book is not a chore for the modern reader.

I hope the movie can match up!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 27 people found the following review helpful By James D. Jenkins on December 13, 2007
Format: Paperback
This novel is an example of the "penny dreadful" genre that was so popular in Victorian England, and it is an easy, fun, enjoyable read, even today, over 150 years after its first publication. I have never seen the musical version by Stephen Sondheim and don't know how close it is to this one, but whether you are a fan of the musical or not, you will likely enjoy this book.

I do have a few problems with this edition, though. First, the book's title is "The String of Pearls"; this edition calls it "Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street" (presumably to capitalize on the musical's success). Also, the back cover and the introduction give away almost any surprise there might have been in the book for those not familiar with the story. If you do not already know the whole plot of the book, I suggest you avoid reading the introduction or back cover until you have finished the novel.

Finally, I found the edition's use of annotations rather annoying. These are indicated with an asterisk (*) in the text and are given in the back of the book. Some of them are absolutely asinine. For example, on page 148, "Hamlet's grave-digger" is annotated as follows: "a reference to Hamlet's exchange with the gravedigger in Hamlet." Thank you, Captain Obvious. Or, for the line "his month is up today, and I must get rid of him," the editor tells us, "Oakley has obviously engaged Sam to work in his shop as a mere employee, and for a trial period." For "cacchinatory", we have, "i.e. cachinnatory"; "tip-top" is given as "excellent"; and fortunately we are notified that "Madagascar" is an "island located off the south-eastern coast of Africa."

Not that the idea of endnotes in general is bad, but there are too many unnecessary ones here, which interfere unnecessarily with an otherwise great read.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By T. L. Crabtree on February 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
I rather with they had went with a better cover.

It's a movie tie-in book, but something that emphasized the fact that the story is actually called "A String of Pearls" would've been lovely. When I first saw this book in the fiction section, I wasn't quite sure: is this one of those cheesy movie adaptations that I always try to avoid?

Fortunately, it wasn't.

I'm sure that there's some disappointed people out there. It seems to be human nature these days to only go for the familiar -- deviations from the comfort zone in the realm of entertainment is rarely accepted. This book really has very little in common with the movie. Of course, as the introduction explains, the musical was based on another theatrical version of the story -- but, knowing how many people I've been acquainted with react, they would absolutely hate this.

Can I deal with trickery to get them to read a classic? Maybe.

Despite the lack of the book's title on the cover and over-emphasizing the movie tie-in, I do enjoy the edition. If only it were available in hardcover.

The introduction is a great history of Sweeney. I know the author wrote an extensive history of Sweeney Todd, but after reading that introduction, I'm not sure if I would want to read more. It seems that all I wanted to know was included in that introduction.

As for the annotations, I wish they were not in the back of the book. It's such a chore to go back that many pages when the bottom of the page would've worked just as well -- most of these annotations aren't so long that they wouldn't fit in a quarter page or less. I do disagree with the other reviewer on these annotations. Despite the sound, most of the annotations are rather helpful to the modern reader.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Juushika on October 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
In Victorian England, a customer steps into Sweeney Todd's barber shop and appears never to step back out. Edited and standardized, this volume presents The String of Pearls, a 1846-7 penny dreadful which was the literary debut of Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street. Don't let the movie tie-in cover fool you into thinking this is a film novelization or a quick and dirty imprint. It's a classic text, and while it may aim to feed off the popularity of Burton's version of Sondheim's play, it's edited by a Sweeney Todd scholar and offers an introduction and footnotes which make it accessible and informative. It's a fine imprint, and of interest therefore to those that want to explore earlier versions of Sweeney Todd's story.

And while fans of the Burton or Sondheim productions may be disappointed to find different plot and characterization, The String of Pearls a.k.a. Sweeney Todd remains an enjoyable tale in its own right. The book, aided by the footnotes, stands the test of time and is accessible to a modern audience. There is one drawback: readers will doubtless be familiar with the secret of Todd's practice and Lovett's pies, but the book depends upon the shock of these revelations--and so the climax, and the end of the book, is somewhat deadened. It's a tolerable disappointment, but a disappointment nonetheless. Still, Sweeney Todd offers just the sort of fearful pleasure that a penny dreadful promises. Todd's characterization is menacing and vibrant, the story moves at a rapid pace while still indulging in the gothic joys of atmosphere and suspense, there's gleeful horror and morbidity (and plenty of delicious pie puns), and while the writing may not be brilliant it is consistently good.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?