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772 of 798 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not my typical reading, but enjoyable light reading!
Hocking has an uncanny ability to write fascinating little stories that are compellingly addicting. Her books are not my typical reading fare - I tend more toward the adult mysteries and suspense type of thing - however ever since I picked up Hocking's My Blood Approves series, I've been strangely addicted to her work. The Trylle series is no exception. Now, I may not...
Published on November 26, 2010 by Amazon Customer

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161 of 190 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars You know when you want to slap the heroine that something is terribly wrong...
That's exactly what I wanted to do throughout the entire book: slap and kill Wendy Everly. She is what made the book not work for me. The writing was neither here nor there but somewhere in the middle. The plot was ok. The secondary characters were a heck of a lot more interesting then Wendy was. It's depressing that we didn't get to learn that much about them. Overall...
Published on September 12, 2010 by M. Burns


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772 of 798 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not my typical reading, but enjoyable light reading!, November 26, 2010
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This review is from: Switched (Trylle Trilogy, Book 1) (Paperback)
Hocking has an uncanny ability to write fascinating little stories that are compellingly addicting. Her books are not my typical reading fare - I tend more toward the adult mysteries and suspense type of thing - however ever since I picked up Hocking's My Blood Approves series, I've been strangely addicted to her work. The Trylle series is no exception. Now, I may not fall in the typical readership for Hocking's books, but because I work as a Probation Officer for teenagers, I tend to read a lot of YA fiction to keep "in touch" with what my kids enjoy.

Hocking's three-part Trylle series, of which Switched is number one, is about a girl who has a miserable existance. Her childhood is filled with little oddities that don't make much sense, and her mother, who refers to her as a "monster" goes so far as to try to stab her to death at her own birthday party. Switched is so much a coming of age tale - with a twist - as Wendy soon discovers that she has another life waiting for her discovery and that she is so much more than an angst filled teenager stuck in high school.

I won't give away any more, as part of the joy of reading this book is discovering - right along with Wendy - just what in the heck is wrong with her and why she has all these odd little habits, abilities and thoughts.

This is not a literary masterpiece for your college Women's Literature 101 class. It was not intended to be so. It is not filled with symbolism and fodder for critical discussion. It IS, however, fun, light reading that will keep your attention. It is a sweet story. Hocking has captured a believable and realistic teenage heroine. She's captured appropriate action, adventure, and even romantic tension. For those reviewers who say the teenage angst is overblown...I would disagree. I work with teenagers for a living and the internal and external dialogue is actually quite realistic for the age group. Perphaps not ALL teens think this way, but the ones I work with quite often do. Many teens - especially girls with abusive backgrounds and lack of a stable parent figure like Wendy - DO think and act this way, althought many of them would be hard pressed to publically admit it.

I've given Switched four stars, not because it isn't excellent, but because I save my five star reviews for books that are out of this world wonderful or books that really speak to me emotionally. This one is excellent, but it is not the definition of perfect. There are a few typos, but they are easily overlooked.

Overall, excellent book. Excellent and believable plot. An overall wonderfully creative and engaging book. Nice job, Amanda - I'm off to purchase #2 in the series and I am looking forward to discovering more.
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154 of 171 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Fantasy!, December 30, 2010
This review is from: Switched (Trylle Trilogy, Book 1) (Paperback)
Hey!

Switched was one interesting book. I loved the story. Every new development was exciting and fun and left me wanting more. The whole plot line is supposed to be a mystery, and I don't want to spoil it for anyone so I'll make this a little vague.

Wendy is a teenager who has, as she puts it, anger-management issues. She also has odd eating habits, odd hair, and an odd way of getting what she wants. Most people think this has to do with what happened to her when she was younger, because her mother tried to kill her as a child. Throughout the book, Wendy is thus struggling with the knowledge that she is hard to deal with, cold, and distant with people. And now that she's moved to ANOTHER new town, ANOTHER new school, with ANOTHER new house, she has promised her brother she's going to try to make this place work and not get in as much trouble. She tries making friends, and so is connected with two boys, one being her love interest with a secret, Finn.

My favorite elements in this story were:

- The Chosen Paranormal Element: I don't want to give away what Wendy is, but it's super rare to read a story about them. It was very cool to see something new and different come out in a story, instead of the same old vampires, werewolves, or fairies (Don't get me wrong, I like some of those, but...they get tiresome after the hundred or so novels you read about them).

- Wendy's Emotional Damage: I think this was dealt with both with subtlety and finesse. You can really believe that Wendy has been emotionally hurt, and that her life has been extremely impacted by that damage.

- Wendy's Tough-Girl Personality: No damsel-in-distress here. No matter what is happening, whether she has an annoying popular chick giving her grief, two kidnappers trying to subdue and capture her, or an all-out battle engaged around her, Wendy is always trying to find a way to at least help take out the bad guys. Wendy doesn't wait around to be saved, she gives it everything she's got to save herself.

- The Romantic Interest: NO LOVE TRIANGLE!! YAY!!! I am beyond sick of love triangles. She loves one guy, that guy loves her, they have issues that make sense, and the teen angst doesn't go on forever. Wendy doesn't just whine over the fact that their romance seems impossible, she goes out and tries to get the man she loves anyway.

- The Quirky Viewpoint: This author has an interesting way of looking at things. There are several lines in this book that I find completely perfect, which is rare in any book. I love her point of view and would continue reading just to hear more of the way Amanda sees the world.

What I Didn't Like:

- The Ending: It sucked! It was a cliff hanger, nothing had been really settled, Wendy was doing something both stupid and annoying, and it left me unsatisfied and listless. Fortunately there's a sequel. Unfortunately, there's a sequel to that sequel, and it isn't out yet.

- The Runaway Syndrome: Seriously, it's a 257 page book and yet Wendy manages to run away from home four times, not to mention running away from the situations and conversations she dislikes about six times. About the only thing Wendy doesn't run away from is a fight, which isn't always a good thing.

- The Powers: While they sound really awesome, and seemed really cool, they weren't really integrated into the storyline very much. Neither were they fully explained. I was very disappointed not to see these used more in the story, and Wendy's powers never got to grow at all either. Very early in the story they discover one of Wendy's powers, talk about how she has to train it for the rest of the book, but never seem to get around to the actual training. Maybe Amanda Hacking tackles this issue in the next book in the series.

Anyway, that's what I thought of Switched. It was a beautiful story, that I adored. I would have given it five stars if the ending hadn't been so disappointing. The rest of the book had me completely mesmerized, but the last chapter just didn't deliver. Even a cliff hanger can be alright, but the ending just left me vaguely annoyed. While I still want to read the next book, that ending stunted my desire a little bit, which was just too bad. The rest of the book had been thrilling and exhilarating, and I couldn't wait to see what was next. Now, I want to know what happens but I'm not so die-hard HAVE to know as I was before.

Hope that helps and have a great day!

Luv ya,
Tashi :)
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161 of 190 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars You know when you want to slap the heroine that something is terribly wrong..., September 12, 2010
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That's exactly what I wanted to do throughout the entire book: slap and kill Wendy Everly. She is what made the book not work for me. The writing was neither here nor there but somewhere in the middle. The plot was ok. The secondary characters were a heck of a lot more interesting then Wendy was. It's depressing that we didn't get to learn that much about them. Overall everything was ok but "Weak Wendy" killed any enjoyment for me.

Let me just say that I have never been more angry, ashamed and frustrated towards a heroine ever. I read a lot of books so that is quite a statement. I have read books were the heroines are selfish, unusual cruel, crude but somehow this was much worse. All these heroines either grow into better people near the end of the book or they do something respectable. It is possible to be bratty, annoying, and rude but still gain the respect of the reader. "Weak Wendy" did none of this. From the beginning she whines and complains about the state of her life, but refuses to make an effort to change anything. She doesn't have any hobbies, likes or interest. This made her a rather flat character. So what's different about this unmotivated angsty teenager? "Weak Wendy" is a troll princess. When she was six years old her mother tried to murder her. That's all that is distinctive about her character. Everything else is forgotten about or unimportant.

"Weak Wendy" has powers that are revealed within in the first 20 pgs but they fall to the backburner as the true plot emerges. "Weak Wendy" has always felt out of place, she gets into fights because she's impulsive and her hair sucks. Pity this girl reader her life is very hard!! And near the beginning I really did. The book starts off with "Weak Wendy" using her mind control abilities to deter a teacher from sending her to the principal's office. This is immoral behavior is rendered ok because she doesn't want to disappoint her family. Fine...it's an awful thing to do but I got over it. "Weak Wendy" notices a weird but slightly attractive kid staring obsessively at her. This kid's name is Finn and he's recently moved to the town just like "Weak Wendy". Nothing exciting happens for the next 30 pgs or so and then BAM what's on the back cover is revealed "Weak Wendy" is a trylle (troll) changeling. Finn is a tracker who has come to bring her back to the Troll World. "Weak Wendy" responds appropriately with dismay and goes to visit her fake mother for answers. This is really the only time where I felt some positive emotion towards "Weak Wendy"; it was probably the best part of the book. Alas it all goes downhill from there.

"Weak Wendy" decides not go with Finn because she loves her fake brother (he was awesome by the way) and fake aunt but ends up going anyway because of the danger. The danger in the book known as the Vittra (fellow troll tribe) are given no depth and while reading I actually forgot about them. What unfolds next is about 200 pgs of "Weak Wendy" rejecting her duties and whining about her life. She makes no attempt to assimilate into troll society or learn more about her situation. Because of this I could feel no empathy towards her. She doesn't seem to care that much about what's going on except for her growing attraction to Finn, so as a result I really didn't care. What was truly tragic about this is that the world seemed so rich and interesting but we don't really get to learn about it. The powers, which she used on the first page, and seemed promising, are promptly forgotten about so she can ogle over Finn. I will say that I LIKED FINN. But I wanted him to die a horrible death by the middle of the book just so "Weak Wendy" would frigging grow up. She was so myopic that it was ridiculous.

Sadly she remains a petulant child. She whines about being a troll princess every couple pages. Tough get over it. The fact that she had only been there for 2 weeks and had met very few people voids her complaints. She whines about not fitting in. You're the freaking princess DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT. She whines about the rules of the society she becomes a part of. YOU'RE THE PRINCESS... WHEN YOU'RE QUEEN YOU CAN CHANGE THEM! She whines about Finn. Face palm. Face palm. Face palm. She whines about missing her family. WRITE A LETTER! She whines about how she has no relationship with her mother. "Weak Wendy" never once sought out her mother, never attempted to bond, and never even had an actual conversation with her.... Don't whine if you don't attempt to change anything. She whines about not knowing about the culture. This really frustrated me. There has to be a library or a collection of history books or something where she can find answers to her questions. She doesn't even try. How can you whine about what's going on when you don't even know??? She whines about her lack of manners. Fix them you foolish girl. She whines about her confusion over her powers. DO SOMETHING. The point of this rant is to illustrate how "Weak Wendy" whines about anything and everything.

The real kicker though is that she does not change. She doesn't even get to save the day in the final battle. Instead she has to be saved by others. This wouldn't be annoying if "Weak Wendy" had done something heroic in course of the book. But she didn't. Instead the kickass secondary characters upstage her. Further more instead of showing some leadership after the disaster she leaves and goes back to her fake home. Despite the fact that there is probably still a threat to her safety. Despite the fact that she has a kingdom and responsibilities. She gets to run away from her responsibilities because she doesn't like them.......... WELCOME TO LIFE "WEAK WENDY"!!!!! You aren't going to like everything but that doesn't mean you can just forego your responsibilities and give up. It's a horrible message and the fact that the book ends this way...BLECK.I have never been so frustrated and pained while reading a story.

I'm not sure why there were spelling mistakes, grammar errors, and missing words in a book that was published but I took it as a good sign. Hopefully this isn't the final version and the character "Weak Wendy" can be redone.
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76 of 90 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly Enjoyed it!, December 26, 2010
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I had seen this book every now and then but was not familiar with it nor was I familiar with the author at all. And the first thing I usually do is read the reviews and see if it is worth a buy - and of course reading a sample of it on my Kindle. This was worth the buy and the a good read. I know she has a vampire series as well, but this one was really great - take a break from the vampire genre.

In a nutshell, Wendy feels that she does not belong - in fact her own mother felt the same way that she nearly killed her daughter. After she receives a visit, to her bedroom at night no less, from the newer student at her school (Finn Holmes) she finds that there is a reason she feels she doesn't belong and the things that seem to happen when she's around...

Don't worry, I won't spoil it for you - gonna have to read and find out.

I am not really a fan of books written in the first person, with the exception of one (White Oleander, Great book by the way!) this one I actually didn't mind at all. I didn't care for Twilight (sorry Twilight fans) simply because I couldn't care for the character because she was...to put it simply...annoying. That's just me though!

I do like how she developed her characters, even the ones that don't have such a big part in the story.

I did spot a few errors, but not enough to completely annoy me - but then I'm not a true grammar person. I will be getting the next book fairly soon (I read the excerpt and I have to know what happens with Wendy). Highly recommended.
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75 of 89 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Spend your 99 cents on a cell phone app instead., February 3, 2011
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`Switched' by Amanda Hocking caught my eye due to its high position on Amazon Kindle's bestsellers and it's awesome price of 99 cents. Without knowing a thing about the book other than the brief synopsis I read before I downloaded the story, and the overwhelming number of positive reviews, I figured it would be an awesome quick read.

`Switched' is about Wendy Everly, a girl who lives with her aunt and brother in an attempt to control the chaos of her life. Her mother, Kim, tried to kill her on her 6th birthday, and since then her life has been a downward spiral of changing homes and failed friendships. Within this backdrop we discover that Wendy has some peculiar abilities, and is given an opportunity by a mysterious boy, Finn, to move once again to a new place where she can finally fit in. However, if she decides to make the move she will have to leave behind her brother and aunt, the only two people who have ever cared about her.

I've only revealed the first 20 pages or so and it sounds like a decent story line right? However, once the story begins to progress you discover that it doesn't go anywhere. The plot never advances, the characters are underdeveloped, the conversation is so far away from colloquial it seems as if the `speaker' is rummaging through a thesaurus before deciding on each word choice, and the romantic elements in the story make you cringe with the overwhelming amount of cheesiness. I suppose if you're into the new `supernatural teen romance' genre that is emerging, this book could be for you. But for anyone that is not familiar with this genre, stay clear of this book. Wendy experiences '0' change throughout the book and the story ends literally and figuratively exactly where it began.

I was astonished to see how many positive reviews this book received, and I understand that Hocking is not attempting to write a literary masterpiece that is applauded by college English professors, but to me, the story was barely enjoyable. My 99 cents would have been better spent on the `Fruit Ninja" app for my iPhone.

On a bookshelf with 5 shelves... shelf 5 being the highest and best, it doesn't even make it to the shelf.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not polished enough for a published novel, January 17, 2011
By 
Lee Rowan (San Francisco Bay Area USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Switched (Trylle Trilogy, Book 1) (Paperback)
I selected this book based on the reviews of others and was disappointed in the quality of the writing and editing. The overall plot was interesting but the dialog was choppy, there were blatant grammatical errors and typos. At one point in the book, a section is even repeated in error.

The author has a good imagination and the work has potential. However, it appears this was self published by the author and could really use a good editor to tighten it up.

In addition, I found I was frustrated by all the negative characters and was longing for deeper character building and relationships. The beginning showed more promise but I found it difficult to work through the rest of the book. At the very end of the book, there is a rush to completion as the author has Wendy rapidly jump to some life changing decisions that are not well supported by the rest of the book.

The work is obviously written by a young author with little experience. While I would find the writing amazing in a community writing class, it is not polished enough for a published piece. I will keep an eye on the author and hope she will sign on with a publisher who can give her writing the guidance and direction it needs.
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67 of 81 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Worse than Stephenie Meyer, March 18, 2011
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I gave it a shot, but this book is truly, shockingly bad. A shame, too, because the general concept was intriguing: a mother attempts to kill her six-year-old daughter, hysterically claiming the girl is a monster. However, the problems in execution are myriad. The characters are paper-thin and insufferable, the dialogue is horrendous, and, on the level of the prose, the author is worse than Stephenie Meyer. Hocking seems not to have a full grasp of the English language, and her style is extremely unpolished. It's no wonder she's so prolific; she seems not to have paused over a single sentence in the book, relating images as they come half-formed into her mind.

Consider the following excerpt, a typical description: "Her short brown pixie cut spiked up all over. Her skirt was short and her black leather jacket went down to her calves. A wind came up, blowing back her coat a bit, and she reminded me of some kind of action star, like she should be in The Matrix."

First of all, does the prose not just make you want to break something? Second, if the garment goes down to your calves, it's not a jacket: it's a coat. The most aggravating thing, though, is that the author has put no original thought whatsoever into this character, or attempted to even describe it uniquely. Here she has stolen an image from another work and, by way of description, given the name of the source. I hesitate to call Amanda Hocking a writer at all. The rest of the book is much the same. Please don't buy it.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Awful, awful book, February 2, 2011
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Reading is like breathing to me, a necessity and almost a non-stop pastime of mine. I love to read anything and everything, particularly fiction. All genres and all styles, including many books that target the young adult audience. I bought this book based on the overwhelmingly good reviews and the great price. I was so disappointed. The writing is beyond bad and quite childish. The characters are underdeveloped and their actions make little sense. I hate to leave such a bad review but this book was not even worth the .99 cents I paid for it. Save your dollar for something else--there are so many better books in this genre that have much more admirable leading ladies and writing styles!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unfortunately, because it's a trilogy..., February 24, 2011
By 
wny_mommy "wny_mommy" (Buffalo, NY United States) - See all my reviews
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I am now compelled to read the rest of them, and under duress, I will.

I enjoyed the concept of this story, and it had so much potential. But reading it made me feel like I was reading a really desperately wanna-be version of Twilight. I am not sure if this is what the author was going for - was she trying to appeal to the Twilight fans by creating this angsty teen character who didn't quite fit in her whole life... until she meets a boy who suddenly can't live without, but is bad for her? Maybe it is just me, but I felt this way the entire time I was reading it - I drew too many parallels, and felt it was not very original.

Aside from the typos and poor editing, I did really want to like this book, and there were times when I found myself more engrossed than I thought I could get. I found myself enjoying Wendy and Finn's moments together, and really do want to know what becomes of them.... but I could not escape the feeling that a teenager really was writing the book. In contrast, when reading Twilight, Bella's intelligence was clearly expressed in the narration, making it a challenging and engrossing read. This writing style just annoyed me more than anything. In particular, I am referring to the gratuitous use of foul language - used far too often and at inappropriate times. I thought that the point the author wanted to get across could have been more appropriately expressed with decent vocabulary than the use of the profanity.

Anyhow, I don't often write these reviews, but I really wanted to post my opinion of this read. Thanks for reading.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Please get an editor Amanda!!!, February 4, 2011
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Terrible writing! I have been reading lots of young adult novels over the past couple of years. I've NEVER been as disappointed at a trilogy as I am now. Hocking's writing style was awful...she doesn't leave much to the readers' imagination. I don't know why she felt that she needed to explain the smallest details as if she were writing to an audience of idiots. Unfortunatelly for me, I became too interested in the plot and could't stop at book no. 1. I read all three books hoping the writing would improve, but I was wrong. It really didn't. The worst part about the book were all the grammatical errors! I hope to God that Hocking didn't pay an actual editor to review her books! Of she did, the owe her a refund. The grammatical errors are school girl mistakes. There are so many errors, I couldn't keep count!
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Switched (Trylle Trilogy, Book 1)
Switched (Trylle Trilogy, Book 1) by Amanda Hocking (Paperback - July 5, 2010)
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