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Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Tiger Edition Paperback – October 1, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0596006600 ISBN-10: 0596006608 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Series: Missing Manual
  • Paperback: 456 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 2nd edition (October 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596006608
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596006600
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.9 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #855,869 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Pogue, Yale '85, is the personal-technology columnist for the New York Times. With nearly 3 million books in print, he is also one of the world's bestselling how-to authors, having written or co-written seven books in the "for Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music), along with several computer-humor books and a technothriller, "Hard Drive" (a New York Times "notable book of the year"). Pogue is also the creator and primary author of the Missing Manual series of complete, funny computer books, a joint venture with O'Reilly & Associates. Titles in the series include Mac OS X, Windows XP, iPod, Microsoft Office, iPhoto, Dreamweaver, iMovie 2, and many others. His Web page is www.davidpogue.com, and his email address is david@pogueman.com.

Adam Goldstein runs GoldfishSoft, a shareware company that makes games and utilities for Mac OS X. Adam is the author of AppleScript: The Missing Manual and was a technical editor for O'Reilly's best-selling Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, and an editor for Mac OS X Panther Power User. When he's not writing books or code, Adam attends high school in New Jersey, where he is captain of the Debate and Quizbowl teams and an editor of the school paper.


More About the Author

David Pogue is the personal-technology columnist for the New York Times. Each week, he contributes a print column, an online column and an online video. His daily blog, "Pogue's Posts," is the Times's most popular blog. David is also an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News and a frequent guest on NPR's "Morning Edition." His trademark comic tech videos appear each Thursday morning on CNBC. With over 3 million books in print, David is one of the world's bestselling how-to authors. He launched his own series of complete, funny computer books called the Missing Manual series, which now includes 60 titles. David graduated summa cum laude from Yale in 1985, with distinction in Music, and he spent ten years conducting and arranging Broadway musicals in New York. He's been profiled on both "48 Hours" and "60 Minutes."

Customer Reviews

Excellent resource for anyone who is switching from a PC to Mac.
Captain Jack
I know after u folks read some of this stuff, u will be like: GET A LIFE!
HomerKSA
I found a wealth of information in an easy format to read and understand.
JoAnn E. Shiley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

168 of 173 people found the following review helpful By foundpoem on August 25, 2006
Format: Paperback
I've been using Windows since the early 1990s and recently bought my first Mac. At first I thought this wasn't the book I wanted. I wanted to learn the OS on its own, not in "translation." For example, you'll find things like this in this book: "Finder = Windows Explorer," "Dock = Taskbar," etc. I thought it would hinder learning in a way total-immersion wouldn't; I'd hoped to learn to use the Mac directly. So after my husband picked up "Switching to the Mac" the first day I had the computer--in order to figure out how to network the Mac to our PCs and printers, and to transfer files, etc. (all of which is in this book)--I ordered four other books. I wanted to read them like other reviewers did: straight through, fun learning. But, it's not as easy as I'd hoped to learn a whole new operating system and, for me, the manuals don't prove to be fun reading -- as cheeky as their humor can be. So, I find myself reaching for "Switching to the Mac" as a necessary reference book. It presupposes that the reader is proficient at using a computer, but not a Mac (unlike other books, which either assume no computer knowledge or are written in "Mac language" for those familiar with previous Mac operating systems.)

That said, the space taken up on translating Windows lingo/usage to Mac takes up space that isn't used to fully describe how to use Mac applications. This book does a stellar, succinct job of teaching the OS. From there, I need a second book to explain the applications. And, oddly for me (because I'm not a David Pogue fan, and wouldn't have chosen either book had my husband not bought this one first) "The Missing Manual OS X," also by Pogue, is the best of the books I've bought for that purpose. The latter picks up where this book leaves off.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Delyse Oxford on August 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
Switching to the Mac -the Missing Manual

Despite it's title this book is not just for those defecting from PC's

An essential for the beginner and an excellent read for those wishing

to burrow into the hidden depths and capabilities of the Mac.

Neither will be disappointed as this is a book written with enthusiasm and humour.

Every topic is dealt with straightforwardly and comprehensively, beginning

with the basics, then leading you on to uncover the complexities, versatility and the

many other wonders of the Mac.

An enlightening and enjoyable read.
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34 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Jack D. Herrington on November 12, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent resource for those looking to switch from Windows to Mac. All the basics of the operating system are there. Methods for getting critical data across from your Windows box is covered. And the text works well for migrating you from the Windows perspective to the Mac.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By John B. Kendrick on February 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is an incredible book. I read all 500 pages cover to cover after purchasing my first ever Mac, an imac G5, in just a few weeks. I have been a corporate trainer in Windows and DOS software for twenty years. I never thought I would switch, and though I liked the look and feel of OS X and the Apple hardware, leafing through this book at the bookstore convinced me to take the plunge.

I just got off a video ichat with my brother-in-law in Alaska from the east coast and what an experience. He's been using macs for some time, but I was able to tell him some secrets I learned from this book in just my few weeks of using my new imac. If you are nervous about switching . . . just do it, you'll be sooo glad. And make sure you get this book to help you through the transition, it is just wonderful. John
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By azcurt VINE VOICE on January 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
Title: Switching To The Mac, Tiger Edition

Author: David Pogue and Adam Goldstein

Publisher: O'Reilly, Pogue Press

ISBN-10: 0-596-00660-8; ISBN-13: 978-0-596-00660-0

Reviewed by: Curt Blanchard, Tucson Macintosh Users Group

Date: 1/2/07

Here is another must-have from the O'Reilly Missing Manual series. Switching to the Mac is a hot topic these days not just because the overall Mac experience is superior, but it's much more secure from malware and other online nastiness. Now that Boot Camp and Parallels allow users to run Windows on the Mac, the arguments against switching are few. This book may well push those fence sitters over the edge. David Pogue and Adam Goldstein explain what the Mac gives you (lots!) - and what it taketh away (not much). With the Mac, you gain stability, strong security, advanced networking, true plug-and-play and simpler everything. When you switch, you may lose a few apps and access to some peripherals.

The book deals with the basics about how a Mac is different in hardware, how to get online and an exploration of the iLife apps as well as Mail, Safari, etc. There are in-depth explanations of Accounts, System Preferences and other things that the new user will need to know. This is no lightweight glossing over of the subject matter; it's over 500 pages of detailed informative material that the new Mac user will want on the reference shelf. One of the well-considered features is a dictionary titled, "Where did it go?" Here you can look up "Alt Key" or "Task bar" and find the Mac equivalents.

If you are a switcher or are considering switching, this is definitely the place to start. If you are looking for a gift for a new Mac switcher, this is something that will be greatly appreciated. Highly recommended.

--Curt Blanchard
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