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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on July 27, 1999
Jamiroquai was great @ Woodstock!!!!! Their new CD has more funk and is less experimental than "Travellin' w/o Moving." Although I'm not a big fan of disco, "Canned Heat" definitely has good vibes and kinda grows on you. "Black Capricorn Day" reminds me of Lenny Kravitz; it's pretty powerful. "Destitute Illusion" is good for an instrumental number and "Where Do We Go From Here" spices it up. My favorite tracks are "Planet Home" and "King for a Day." I love the bassline in "Planet Home" and it's not lacking in any of the songs, Nick Fyffe does a good job. "King for a Day" is a nice dose of Gothic meets Acid Jazz, very cool. Even though "King 4 a Day" is meant as a personal message to Zender, it has the best set of lyrics in the album and the most riveting music. It should be the title track for a movie soundtrack.
So if you're looking for something new or you just like Jamiroquai's Funk n Acid Jazz style, then go get this album. Just don't turn down this album because you're a Suburban Casualty, don't live n die in the norm...EXPERIMENT!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on August 4, 2000
As the band's fourth studio effort, "Synkronized," truly validates Jamiroquai's status as the most popular and gifted soul group out there. Fresh from the success of their best selling "Travelling Without Moving" album, Jay Kay and his band return with a fresh sounding sound that no one can try to imitate.
The first single "Canned Heat," is a high-tech, funk creation that brings the bands to their roots. Fast, beat-laden rhythms and Jay Kay's moving vocals made this song a hit during the summer of 1999. Other tracks such as "Planet Home," show how Jamiroquai is able to use various international musical styles (in this case their use of salsa in the third-quarter of the song) really can rock a crowd without them really knowing what they are hearing.
Other songs as "Supersonic" and "Butterfly" are some of the album's great tracks, however unlike their previous album, this album is short on songs that made "Travelling Without Moving" such a huge international hit. Nevertheless, "Synkronized" is an awesome album. Give this and all of Jamiroquai's albums a try, and I can guarantee that you'll become bonafide fans. No one can resist the power and sound of Jamiroquai.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on August 4, 2000
As the band's fourth studio effort, "Synkronized," truly validates Jamiroquai's status as the most popular and gifted soul group out there. Fresh from the success of their best selling "Travelling Without Moving" album, Jay Kay and his band return with a fresh sounding sound that no one can try to imitate.
The first single "Canned Heat," is a high-tech, funk creation that brings the bands to their roots. Fast, beat-laden rhythms and Jay Kay's moving vocals made this song a hit during the summer of 1999. Other tracks such as "Planet Home," show how Jamiroquai is able to use various international musical styles (in this case their use of salsa in the third-quarter of the song) really can rock a crowd without them really knowing what they are hearing.
Other songs as "Supersonic" and "Butterfly" are some of the album's great tracks, however unlike their previous album, this album is short on songs that made "Travelling Without Moving" such a huge international hit. Nevertheless, "Synkronized" is an awesome album. Give this and all of Jamiroquai's albums a try, and I can guarantee that you'll become bonafide fans. No one can resist the power and sound of Jamiroquai.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 18, 1999
I really don't know why Synkronized was such a disappointment chart-wise. One would think that this great band had a following after the success of travelling without moving and the single virtual insanity. This album is Jam's best CD yet. they matured extremely on this album. Canned Heat, the first single, should have got WAY more radio support than Virtual Insanity got, becuase it's actually a much catchier and better song. Black capricorn day, the second single, is much more mellow and slow for Jam standards, but turns out to be a song that grows on you more and more with each listen. The third single, King for a Day, is a gem that will get ya movin. The new single, Supersonic, is another dance song. The whole album is great, though I have to say, I'm disappointed by the booklet contents. I might just have a thing about good Cd booklets, but although the bullman art is really cool, there's NO lyrics! I still don't know the exact words to the chorus of canned heat. (the closest I can get it is "got canned heat in my heels tonight, big ben!") I got into jamiroquai about a month ago only, having not being even scraped by the band's music, mostly because I'm a teen, and i love in a world full of boys from a backstreet somewhere, a dude who wants to shake his bon-bon, bizkits that are rearranged and some fruits who run around naked everywhere, but don't have the body for it. (sorry, I used to love blink, but they are a living inside joke now). Hey, I know for a fact this disco is cooler than my parent's disco. Get into Jam if you want to be "SYNK"ronized, but not "NSYNC". (P.S. "Falling" is a tighter love song than all the "that ways" and "hearts tearing up" combined). I guess for now, Jam just has to settle being on top of the US dance charts.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 2, 1999
I may be one of the few die-hard Jamiroquai fans of the new millennium. I have been swayed by their inllectual (yet catchy) songwriting, meticulously crafted instrumentals, and J's unique, airy vocals. I have also been an advocate despite all the harsh-biting critiques of various, boat-rocking music critics. I'm really digging Synkronized, and it may be a cliche, but I was skeptical about Zender's leave. But they caught my ear and I believe it's tightly arranged/produced, maybe even more than T.W.M., despite the thrashing of several Zender-wrought tracks. Personally, I don't think that any other band has anything on them at the moment and perhaps never will. My all-time favorite track is "Soul Education" because the rockin' strings get your feet tapping and the bassline is really hardcore (Give props to J's determined vocals). Besides that, I really love uptempo cuts like "Canned Heat"/"Supersonic" and ballads like "Butterfly"/"Falling". And you've got to give acclaim to the everpresent instrumental (Destitute Illusions- with its eerie, ambient aura). I'm really a new fan because I only own T.W.M. & Synk' Synk' is a great millennium album because of its thumping basslines, lush strings, and compelling synths. Jamiroquai's acid-jazzy funk is really "sticthed into their clothing." Make sure you crank the volume, it sounds even better at the house-vibrating level. (However irrelevant, I really think "Emergency On Planet Earth" is one the tightest songs they ever put out, the music's really bangin').
P.S. (Synkronized isn't THAT much disco-esque, but hey, just as long as it keeps you dancing, get down & rock on!)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 6, 2000
After moonwalking off two years ago with a hatful of statuettes at the Grammys and the MTV Video Music Awards for Jamiroquai's Travelling Without Moving, Jay Kay, the British band's 29-year-old singer and creator, is back with another dance-friendly collection.
Along with the usual funky jazz-pop tunes, this time Kay--who writes and arranges the group's music and does the choreography for its videos and stage shows--adds an even greater dose of '60s-and-'70s-style funk to the mix. With its fuzzy bass lines, electric piano fills, percussive guitar riffs and Kay's Motown vocal style, Synkronized owes heavy debts to R&B stars of yore: Stevie Wonder, Curtis Mayfield and Sly and the Family Stone. "Soul Education'' opens with a bass line that sounds an awful lot like the Temptations' "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone.'' A refrain in the opening track, "Canned Heat,'' is pure mindless mid-'70s disco: "You know this boogie is for real.'' Yet Kay (who named his "Jam'' band in honor of the Iroquois Indians) is a prince of pop thieves, a Robin Hood who steals from the rich musical past and gives to the poor, formula-fed listeners of today.
Very danceable--Buy it and be funkified!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on June 9, 1999
If your a Jamiroquai fan (or not), then no matter what you've heard or what your expecting, this album will grow on you. I guarantee it! I had my doubts (with Stuart splitting from the group and all) but the band pulled through and crammed some excellent funk onto this album. "Canned Heat" will get any party bumping. "Planet Home" has the phatest farty-synthesized bassline I've ever heard on a Jamiroquai track (besides Deeper Underground). Supersonic (with it's wobbly digeridoo vs. synth bassline) and King For A Day (with its unique harpsichord/piano riffs) are the only "experimental" tracks on this album, and they work very well. Zender's presence is missed on this album however. Most of the basslines, and beats for that matter, seem to have been produced on synthesizers and other assorted studio equipment. More presence from individual members such as D-Zire (turntables), Wallis (digeridoo), and Sola (assorted percussion) would have added more spice to the album as well. Also lacking from the album are the beautiful instrumentals and downtempo/spliffed-out tracks we're so used to hearing from this band. "Destitute Illusion" (the only instrumental on the album) is a nice little techno-lounge gem, but lacks ambition. The band could have explored a little more with the Latin styles they seem to flirt with for brief moments on "Planet Home" and "Supersonic" (as they've done with reggae and drum&bass etc. on previous albums). Often the album (clocking in at a way-too-short 48 minutes!) feels more like a rushed studio album rather than a "band" album. We can only wait and see how the new tracks will translate into the live show. Synkronized might not be on the same level as Jam's other albums but it certainly is not a bad album in the least. Synkronized just has a lot to live up to after Jamiroquai's previous gems. Each Jamiroquai album has it's own unique flavor and the latest is no exception. Synkronized is a worthy album that deserves a spot in your music collection (right along side your Stevie Wonder, Roy Ayers, Ohio Players, and Sly records). Bottom line, this album WILL make you want to shake your booty. Isn't that what funk is all about?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 17, 1999
Bottom line first: Disappointment! Why? Don't get me wrong here! Being an early adopter of jam's funkymania back in late 1992 and having heard canned heat/wolf in sheep's clothing on radio, I was (desperately) waiting for the release of the new album. But where are the groovy tracks? Canned Heat, ok, but what if you already own the single? Soul education? Nice, but Jay can do better! Supersonic? Too slow, no bass line. Where are the cool Instrumentals? Destitute Illusion? Come on! Somebody already wrote „overproduced" to which I could add flavorless, juiceless, grooveless... Maybe Zender's influence is missing. Compared to the previous albums this is great disappointment to me. Remember the bonus track „function" of Travelling without Moving? Very simple recording but still it got what it needs to dance & party. This time the music quickly disappears in the background...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The follow-up to the group's 1997 smash "Travelling Without Moving," "Synkronized" pays homage to the sounds of the 70's. A good ear can hear the influence of Marvin Gaye, Isaac Hayes, The Electric Light Orchestra, Chic, The Commodores, Earth, Wind, & Fire, as well as host of other giants of the "ME DECADE."

While others have found this release musically lacking the depth of its predecessor, I, for one, find it to be one FUN package. This collection of R & B funk shows why Jamiroquai is one of the best bands on the planet.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2004
Funk, disco, dance, the list of genres can go on and on... Jamiroquai is no fad band caught in a time warp. They are the current real thing giving their own unique and sophisticated spin on these styles of the 70's and early 80's...Some of the productions like the opening track Canned Heat should make Quincy Jones and Michael Jackson proud since you can hear the strong influences. But make no mistake, it is STILL Jamiroquai's own material and sound ! There is something familiar but yet oh so futuristic. Highly infectious grooves with a little dash of some early and late 70's Motown feel on some tracks that do indeed harken back to the day when Stevie Wonder was feelin' Superstitious...Out of all the Jamiroquai cd's or productions I find myself always going back to this one from 1999. You will too !
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