File System Forensic Analysis and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: $79.99
  • Save: $63.99 (80%)
Rented from apex_media
To Rent, select Shipping State from options above
Due Date: Dec 21, 2014
FREE return shipping at the end of the semester. Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with rentals.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by apex_media
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships direct from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime Shipping and FREE standard shipping for orders over $25. Overnight and 2 day shipping available!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Qty:1
  • List Price: $79.99
  • Save: $35.71 (45%)
Only 18 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Trade in your item
Get a $6.21
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

File System Forensic Analysis Paperback – March 27, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0321268174 ISBN-10: 0321268172 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $44.28
Rent
Price: $16.00
42 New from $34.95 46 Used from $17.73
Rent from Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.00
$44.28
$34.95 $17.73
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

File System Forensic Analysis + Windows Forensic Analysis Toolkit, Third Edition: Advanced Analysis Techniques for Windows 7 + Digital Forensics with Open Source Tools
Price for all three: $153.37

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 600 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (March 27, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321268172
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321268174
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 1.3 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #241,656 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

The Definitive Guide to File System Analysis: Key Concepts and Hands-on Techniques

Most digital evidence is stored within the computer's file system, but understanding how file systems work is one of the most technically challenging concepts for a digital investigator because there exists little documentation. Now, security expert Brian Carrier has written the definitive reference for everyone who wants to understand and be able to testify about how file system analysis is performed.

Carrier begins with an overview of investigation and computer foundations and then gives an authoritative, comprehensive, and illustrated overview of contemporary volume and file systems: Crucial information for discovering hidden evidence, recovering deleted data, and validating your tools. Along the way, he describes data structures, analyzes example disk images, provides advanced investigation scenarios, and uses today's most valuable open source file system analysis tools—including tools he personally developed. Coverage includes

  • Preserving the digital crime scene and duplicating hard disks for "dead analysis"

  • Identifying hidden data on a disk's Host Protected Area (HPA)

  • Reading source data: Direct versus BIOS access, dead versus live acquisition, error handling, and more

  • Analyzing DOS, Apple, and GPT partitions; BSD disk labels; and Sun Volume Table of Contents using key concepts, data structures, and specific techniques

  • Analyzing the contents of multiple disk volumes, such as RAID and disk spanning

  • Analyzing FAT, NTFS, Ext2, Ext3, UFS1, and UFS2 file systems using key concepts, data structures, and specific techniques

  • Finding evidence: File metadata, recovery of deleted files, data hiding locations, and more

  • Using The Sleuth Kit (TSK), Autopsy Forensic Browser, and related open source tools

When it comes to file system analysis, no other book offers this much detail or expertise. Whether you're a digital forensics specialist, incident response team member, law enforcement officer, corporate security specialist, or auditor, this book will become an indispensable resource for forensic investigations, no matter what analysis tools you use.

Brian Carrier has authored several leading computer forensic tools, including The Sleuth Kit (formerly The @stake Sleuth Kit) and the Autopsy Forensic Browser. He has authored several peer-reviewed conference and journal papers and has created publicly available testing images for forensic tools. Currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Digital Forensics at Purdue University, he is also a research assistant at the Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) there. He formerly served as a research scientist at @stake and as the lead for the @stake Response Team and Digital Forensic Labs. Carrier has taught forensics, incident response, and file systems at SANS, FIRST, the @stake Academy, and SEARCH.

Brian Carrier's http://www.digital-evidence.org contains book updates and up-to-date URLs from the book's references.


© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Brian Carrier has authored several leading computer forensic tools, including The Sleuth Kit (formerly The @stake Sleuth Kit) and the Autopsy Forensic Browser. He has authored several peer-reviewed conference and journal papers and has created publicly available testing images for forensic tools. Currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Digital Forensics at Purdue University, he is also a research assistant at the Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) there. He formerly served as a research scientist at @stake and as the lead for the @stake Response Team and Digital Forensic Labs. Carrier has taught forensics, incident response, and file systems at SANS, FIRST, the @stake Academy, and SEARCH.

Brian Carrier's http://www.digital-evidence.org contains book updates and up-to-date URLs from the book's references.


© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Easy to understand and very thorough.
Cmore
If you have a need to thoroughly understand computer file systems for whatever reason, you need this book... File System Forensic Analysis by Brian Carrier.
Thomas Duff
Highly recommended and a must buy if you're interested in "hardcore" digital forensics.
Golden G. Richard III

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By jose_monkey_org on August 30, 2005
Format: Paperback
It's easy to think that computer filesystems are relatively simple things. After all, if 'dir' or 'ls' don't show what you're looking for, maybe an undelete program will work. Or will it? To be a decent, trustworthy expert in forensics (a requirement if you plan to participate in any criminal investigations), you'll have to learn how filesystems really operate, how tools like undelete and lazarus work, and how they can be defeated.

Carrier's book isn't a legal book at all, and it doesn't pretend to offer much insight into the law surrounding forensics. Instead it focuses on technical matters, and is sure to be the gold standard in its field. This is important, because it comes at you expecting you to have some knowledge, even if only informal, of what a filesystem contains. With a basic understanding of data structures, you'll get a wealth of information out of this book, and it will be a good reference long after you've first studied it.

File System Forensic Analysis is divided into three sections. These are arranged in the order that you'll want to study them to maximize the benefit you can hope to achieve, namely an understanding of how to examine filesystems for hidden or previously stored data. The first three chapters cover a fundamental series of topics: Digital Investigation Foundations, Computer Foundations, and an introduction to Hard Disk Data Acquisition. While they start at a basic level (e.g. what hexadecimal is), they quickly progress to more developed topics, such as the types of interfaces (SATA, SCSI, IDE), the relationship of the disk to the computer system as a whole, and how data is stored in a file and filesystem at a basic level.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By D. Baker on May 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
Brian Carrier has written a solid book that should be on the reference shelf of anyone in the Digital Forensics field that conducts analysis of file systems. The book is well organized into three parts, each with multiple chapters.

The first part discusses the foundations necessary to understand digital evidence, computer functions and acquiring data for analysis. This part is intentionally at a higher level, yet still provides the necessary foundations for the subsequent parts. A good explanation of host protected area (HPA) and device configuration overlays (DCO) is included, as well as methods by which one can test for such areas on volumes.

The second part discusses volume analysis. Brian takes this topic and divides it into four chapters addressing basic volumes, personal computer volumes, server volumes and finally multiple disk volumes. He provides detailed information on a variety of common partition types, even including both SPARC and i386 partition information for Sun Solaris.

Finally the third part discusses file system analysis, and the last 10 chapters are dedicated to covering general information, and then detailed descriptions of concepts, analysis and data structures for FAT, NTFS, Ext2, Ext3, UFS1 and UFS2 file systems. The detailed information provided well-documented explanations and included analysis scenarios. For instance, in his discussion of NTFS analysis, an image of a damaged disk is evaluated, and he provides meaningful explanations of reconstructing the damaged tables to allow analysis of the data. He provides many such examples throughout.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
Brian Carrier has stepped up to the plate and filled a void in host based digital forensics that has been missing for years. "File System Forensic Analysis" covers nearly every low level aspect of file systems, the heart of every computer forensics investigation. In an age where most digital forensic investigations are oversimplified with GUI analysis suites, Mr. Carrier brings us back to the basis of investigative techniques in a very easy to understand manner.

I especially respect how Mr. Carrier took the extra time to develop a framework used to discuss and compare the file systems. His generalized framework should make it easy for the reader to address the differences discovered between file systems.

In addition to the expected file system discussions, there were a few extra surprises in the book that are worth mentioning. Mr. Carrier included information regarding methods different Operating Systems (and versions of those Operating Systems) interface with their file systems. For example, the infamous creation time/date stamp after the last written time/date stamp phenomenon is clearly explained for Microsoft Windows file systems.

I keep very few printed books as reference guides, but this book will be close to my computer during every investigation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Dr Anton Chuvakin on April 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
More and more good forensics books show up at my doorstep (some bad ones have surfaced as well...). However, Brian's "File System Forensics Analysis" is exceptional in its depth of coverage of modern computer file systems. No other book published so far (and, I suspect, ever) offers that level of details on the internals of file systems such as ext2, ext3, NTFS, FAT and also UFS1 and 2. This is not a general purpose forensics practitioner guide, nor is it a guide to acquiring evidence (however, the book does contain a brief intro to the forensic process). The book just looks at the file systems! There was definitely a need for a source of low-level information on filesystem internals as they apply to forensics. What are the NTFS-specific acquisition issues? Ext3 vs ext2? Etc, etc - many other technical forensics questions are answered in this book.

Ok, so you are the type who run EnCase once and think you are ready to go to court to testify? Have you looked at Windows swap file? Alternative data streams? Host-protected area? No? Then get the book. The book will help law enforcement computer crime folks (those already skilled in forensics), forensics consultants and internal investigators to learn what is really going on when bits get copied, removed, acquired, etc.

Anton Chuvakin, Ph.D., GCIA, GCIH, GCFA is a Security Strategist with a major security company. He is an author of the book "Security Warrior" and a contributor to "Know Your Enemy II". In his spare time, he maintains his security portal info-secure.org
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews