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T.R.: The Last Romantic Paperback – September 11, 1998


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T.R.: The Last Romantic + Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt + Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 928 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; First Edition edition (September 11, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465069592
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465069590
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 2.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #99,455 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Prolific Texas A&M historian Brands (Reckless Decade, LJ 11/15/95) makes his first venture into biography with this lengthy book on Theodore Roosevelt. Roosevelt's often tragic life?his first wife and mother died the same day under the same roof?is fully explored. Brands ignores neither the personal nor the political side of his subject, depicting Roosevelt as a romantic during his idyllic childhood; his grieving over the early death of his wife, Alice; the war in 1898; and his governorship and presidency. But as America's romantic era ended abruptly on the battlefields of France in 1918, Roosevelt's life ended as well. Brands uses Roosevelt's many personal letters to tell his story in a firsthand manner, resulting in the most comprehensive Roosevelt biography yet. As the centennial of the Spanish American War approaches, Roosevelt is once again in the news, and this excellent biography may well get its share of attention?and awards. Highly recommended for all libraries.?Boyd Childress, Auburn Univ. Libs., Ala.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

Theodore Roosevelt emerges as considerably more than his toothy Rough Rider legend in this extensively researched, psychologically penetrating biography of our 26th president. Even as an asthmatic child, when he began to mold his mind with tales of heroes and his body with physical exercise, Roosevelt saw life as a series of struggles and achievements, according to Brands (History/Texas A&M Univ.; The Reckless Decade, 1995). In young adulthood, this quest for heroism redoubled with the death of his father, who set a near-impossible moral standard. T.R.'s Manichaean perception of the world gave him the moral confidence, energy, and charisma that endeared him to supporters, but it also led him to intemperate, even demagogic attacks on opponents (e.g., he accused Woodrow Wilson of ``criminal folly'' for not preparing the US more thoroughly for entry into WW I). Brands absolves him of what critics viewed as his hypocrisy, noting that Roosevelt's near-total incapacity for reflection and self-knowledge led him, for good and ill, to ignore legal and procedural obstacles (notably by fomenting revolution in Panama to get the canal built there). Brands also adeptly traces the effect of Roosevelt's romanticism on his private life, noting that T.R.'s grief over the death of his first wife was so intense that he almost never referred to her after she died and maintained a more distant relationship with their daughter, Alice, than he did with the children of his second marriage. Brands accords Roosevelt full credit for blazing a path for future presidents in assuming responsibility for the economy and international security, and for using his office's ``bully pulpit'' to goad the national conscience. Missing some of the brio of Edmund Morris's The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt and of the colonel himself, but a life that pays its subject the ultimate tribute of taking him seriously as an adult. (b&w photos, not seen) -- Copyright ©1997, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

H.W. Brands taught at Texas A&M University for sixteen years before joining the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is the Dickson Allen Anderson Centennial Professor of History. His books include Traitor to His Class, Andrew Jackson, The Age of Gold, The First American, and TR. Traitor to His Class and The First American were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize.

Customer Reviews

I liked the book and highly recommend it to students of American history and to those who like a good biography.
Metallurgist
The meticulous research and the flowing style of narrative make the biography both historically accurate and wonderfully entertaining.
W. S. Jones
H.W. Brands writes eloquently and intimately about the life of one of America's most (deservedly) storied presidents.
Anthony

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 51 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed reading this book!
I had read Henry Pringle's Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of TR written in 1931 and found it to be dated both in writing style and historical interpretation. Brands's 1990's update reveals little in the way of new data about this most interesting American, but it certainly brought to life in vivid detail a grand character the likes of which we shall not see again.
Brands correctly compared TR's successful effort to construct the Panama Canal to JFK's push to send a man to the moon. Historians can argue about which has had the more lasting practical impact. In the diplomatic game of hawks and doves, Roosevelt was the leading raptor of his generation. While president, TR stared down German Kaiser Wilhelm in a shrewd reassertion of the Monroe Doctrine during a crisis involving Venezuela. One wonders whether his "big stick" approach to international affairs and the particular influence he had on Germany might have changed the course of world history had he been elected in 1912, when he ran as a Progressive.
As Brands points out, Roosevelt himself was a historian of some note and served as President of the American Historical Association after leaving the presidency. The author quotes from a keynote address Roosevelt gave to one of the Association's meetings in which TR advocated for a romantic interpretation of history focussing on the qualities he idealized: principled bravery, heroism and moral certitude. Brands's account of TR's life pays homage to this approach, but is nevertheless even-handed. Roosevelt's personality eventually verged on being megalomaniacal; still, the story of the sickly, asmatic child molding himself through sheer determination into the great man he became is truly inspirational.
I found this book a pretty quick read despite it being over 800 pages.
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By W. S. Jones on March 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
I repeat my review in order to link it to my newly created Amazon account.
I cannot speak highly enough of this book. The meticulous research and the flowing style of narrative make the biography both historically accurate and wonderfully entertaining. I felt at times that I was reading a novel. I was daunted a bit at first by the sheer size of the tome, but once my nose was in it I found it difficult to put down. One of the things that make this book different than the run of the mill biography is the sources the author used. He draws upon not only ommonly available documentation, but also upon personal letters to and from Roosevelt and his family, associates, cabinet members, and others. Also, the collection of photographs is in chronological order, which allows you to get a photographic history as well. The only instructive criticism I would give is that there is possibly a little too much psychoanalysis from the author on some of Roosevelt's motives. This should in no way discourage anyone from reading this gem of a book. My highest regards and kudos goes to Mr. Brands for a most excellent contribution to my library.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By J. Remington on April 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
Brands, while writing in robust prose worthy of one of the tragically few renaissance men to inhabit The White House, avoides any real serious critical evaluation of Roosevelt's policies (certainly when taken in a 21st Century context). Brands also doesn't truly succeed, in my view, of creating a broader historical context of the world Teddy lived in and how its effects upon us- always a key point in a successful biography.
Those criticisms aside, "The Last Romantic" works as a consitently entertaining and colorful character study. And that may very well have been Brands intention. If so, then he has succeeded marvelously so.
Roosevelt was many,many things: scientist, soldier, rancher, philosopher, statesman, traveller and historian (this is just an abbreviated list) besides a president who put the "conserve" in conservative; and Brands may be his biggest fan. Sharing Brands' passion for TR going into this book, I had my admiration confirmed.
All in all, this book is highly reccomended not so much as historical scholarship, but rather as a fascinating portrait of a fascinating man.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Richard Quarles on March 12, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The early years of T.R.'s life are well defined and interesting in this solid biography. However, once T.R becomes President things seem a bit rushed. It's almost as if the author lost interest in his subject once he entered the White House.
Brands is sympathetic, but even-handed in his assessments of Roosevelt's' strengths and faults. One easily accepts Brands premise that much of Roosevelt's life was spent over-compensating for his early frail health and is as amused as the author clearly is at Roosevelt's occasional macho antics.
Brands frequently quotes Roosevelt to good effect and provides some historical background. However, I would have liked to see more of a historical overview during T.R.'s two terms in office as President and especially his run for a third term at the head of the "Bull Moose" Progressive Party. This critical period of T.R. (and the Republican Party's) life does not come across in enough detail or context.
Overall, unless you're a T.R. buff or a die hard biography fan, I'd give this 800+ page book a pass. Much better to read his truly excellent biography of Ben Franklin, The First American.
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