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TAZ: The Temporary Autonomous Zone, Ontological Anarchy, Poetic Terrorism (Autonomedia New Autonomy Series) Paperback – June 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: Autonomedia New Autonomy Series
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Autonomedia; 2 Sub edition (June 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1570271518
  • ISBN-13: 978-1570271519
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 4.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #216,021 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Hakim Bey is the nom-de-plume of a notorious anarchist intellectual, under which a large number of essays and communiques have appeared, mostly in the punk underground and on-line. He splits his time between a trailer in the New Jersey Pine Barrens and a run-down NYC Chinatown hotel.

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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Ugo de Luna Gomes on July 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
A masterpiece, quite possibly the best book I have ever read! Hakim Bey managed to synthesize the philosophical statement that I have been looking for my whole life! It is good to see such an articulate voice out there who managed to "see through" the paradigm -the Spectacle- and suggest such creative and joyous ways for all humans realize their TRUE POTENTIAL. I've always felt that mysticism and all that consciousness-expansion talk had received a bad stigma because of all the "new age" framing it undertook, but Bey manages not only to "deframe" this concept, and poetically shows the VALUE that such practices can have to "free one's mind" - show people that they need not be oppressed, dogmatic, hive-minded SLAVES, that they truly are MONARCHS. Mysticism helps in a way that it provides methods for the individual rid himself of the "inner cops" inside their heads -all the social programming of generations, sabotaging us by our Freaudian Superegos. Deep inner changes, deep inner consciousness are monstrous catalysts for social reforms -accompanied by good wine and sense of humour- in true anarchist fashion, as Bey rightly states, even though I have a feeling his intent was more focused on change on an individual level...

Well, it was definitely the first book that made me laugh and cry hysterically, but I understand it might be too overwhelming to some...

I'm hopeful that younger generations, such as mine (I'm 20) have the opportunity to be presented to such work, especially at an early age... Man, why haven't I read this back in my schooldays? I might just have quit everything and ran into the woods! =D

5*s
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 17, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This small book is so big in ideas. This man truly understands the beauty and love of freedom itself.

I'm not saying this as an "Anarchist" or -ist or -tarian or -whatever. I like this book for the thoughts in its essays.

And yes, indeed, I do want somehow to find/create even for a brief time a truly T.A.Z... Perhaps on an artificial island in the pacific? Or perhaps in a decade or so with our economy trashing we can have "Free Cities" briefly?
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By W. T. Hoffman TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
For me, this is the kind of head trip I enjoy reading. It's not deep, but it can be. It's not serious, but it can lead to some very serious considerations. Actually, much of this book is outrageously funny. It's like Salvatore Dali rewriting the Dharmapada on LSD. Maybe what makes this book interesting, is the way it CONFRONTS you on so many levels. Sometimes, you are confronted by your sense of decency. Other times, you are confronting why you have the sense of humor you do. Because I found myself laughing over and over, about a story conserning incest producing a small tribe of half crazed gypsies living within the lonely trailors in the Pine Barrens. But mostly, the book confronts the mediocracy of normalacy. What can you say when a man tells you, "HEY, mysticism doesnt dissolve the Ego, only Death does that, nor does mysticism destroy the carnal desires." It sounds like a wise jester at our disposal. In fact, history tells us that the most enlightened zen masters, were ALWAYS seen as madmen, just as you have "divine idiots" in eastern Christianity, or crazed yogis who tell you the meaning of life, is that life has no meaning. Or whatever. This book takes the stuffing out of SO MUCH, and with great insight, and black humor, that you cant put it down. Hey, what can you say if someone writes down a title chapter as "BLACK MAGIC AS A REVOLUTIONARY ACTION"? To me, its back to the yippies trying to levitate the Pentagon, back in the 1960s peace marches. So, the book's not demonic, just confrontational. Indeed, its primarily a book about how to be an ANARCHIST. Or, how to conduct LIVING THEATER to confront the banality of existence. Let's have a revolution, and make Popeye our new leader. (We've done worse.Read more ›
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8 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 15, 2004
Format: Paperback
It's been a while since I read this, but I've always remembered it with some fondness. The book is a collection of essays on different aspects living life outside of society's rules. I thought the book was so interesting since it was such a modern description of anarchy. Bey's description of autonomous zones throughout history also gives pause and can make one wonder why we do accept the "Rules" as they are dictated to us. There are many historical examples of those that don't, and they go on to great creativity or interesting lives.
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19 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Phil Myers on April 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
This puerile, bombastic, and muddled pamphlet will be of little use to anyone seriously concerned with remaking society along egalitarian, anti-hierarchical lines.

In a series of feverish and haphazard essays, 'Bey' (Peter Lamborn Wilson) lays out a defeatist, hedonistic, amoral, mystical argument for anarchists to abandon the real work of organizing in favor of creating "Temporary Autonomous Zones". Bey studiously avoids defining the 'TAZ', but the concept boils down to discrete and ephemeral blossomings of freedom and play-- parties, pirate ships, frontier communities, insurrections, etc.

Murray Bookchin, in his essay "Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm" (available on the web) delivers the definitive downdressing of Bey for this facile and retrograde individualist doctrine, to which I have little to add.

I will say that the kernels of truth that the book contains, such as the observation that revolution must be rooted in joys and dreams as much as outrage and suffering, and that 'one cannot struggle for what one does not know', have been presented with superior flair and sophistication both before and after Bey (See e.g. the French Situationists, or more recently, Ken Knabb and the Crimethinc collective).
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