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TEACH CHANGE LIVES EBOOK Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • ISBN-10: 1588601188
  • ISBN-13: 978-1588601186
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (93 customer reviews)

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Customer Reviews

In "Teaching to Change Lives," Dr. Hendricks shares seven "laws."
Lawrence W. Johnson
Overall, I thought that this was a very good easy book to read that is worth the time of any teacher!
Dane Voorhees
Teaching and learning are most effective when both teacher and learner are prepared.
Michael Taylor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Michael Taylor TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
Hendricks has written a gem containing valuable information on how a person can become a more dynamic teacher. Among the important points the author covers include:
1. If you stop growing today, you stop teaching tomorrow.
2. Convince your students that you believe in them!
3. Maximum learning is the result of maximum involvement.
4. Preparation is the key to good communication.
5. The teacher's character, compassion, and content are what motivates the learner the most.
6. Teaching and learning are most effective when both teacher and learner are prepared.
7. The teacher needs to be creative in the ways learners are motivated.
8. Tension is an important part of the learning process.
While Hendricks writes from the viewpoint of a seminary professor, anyone involved in any kind of teaching environment will greatly benefit from the book.
Read, enjoy, and be challenged to be a better teacher!
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31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Stuart Dauermann on December 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
Howard Hendricks is something of a Conservative Evangelical icon, a teacher of teachers, who for more than forty years shaped the teaching ministries of students at Dallas Seminary. Regardless of what one might think of Dispensationalism, it is undeniable that Dallas Grads are formidable teachers. More than any other figure, the credit for that reality goes to Howard Hendricks.

Using the acronym "TEACHER," and basing his approach on Gregory's "Seven Laws of Teaching," Hendricks seeks to outline the basic skills, attitudes and characteristics of good teaching and of the good teacher. Clearly he seeks to transform not only the teaching but also the teacher. He does this by devoting one chapter to each of seven characteristics , in an anecdotally- and wisdom-rich format.

Chapter One - The Law of the Teacher-- Stop growing today and you stop teaching tomorrow. He begins by emphasizing that the teacher can only teach as he/she continues to be a learner. When the learning stops, the well runs dry. In addition, people will become conformed to the image of the teacher. Therefore, a teacher must take care to be worthy of imitation, especially in the area of character. For Hendricks, the best candidates for the role of teacher are faithful, available and teachable. Other people need not apply. The teacher must be developing in the intellectual, physical [practical], and social dimensions.

Chapter Two - The Law of Education--How people learn determines how you teach. People are only candidates for learning when they know they don't know and when they care about that. After Maslow, Hendricks speaks of four levels of learning : unconscious incompetence, conscious incompetence, conscious competence, and unconscious competence.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Dan Panetti VINE VOICE on June 26, 2006
Format: Paperback
The great Dallas Theological Seminary professor Dr. Hendricks shares with others his basic principles for passing on to his students the knowledge and passion for God's Word. Basically the book can be boiled down to one primary principle - you must have passion for what you know to transfer what you know to others. The book was originally released as The Seven Laws of the Teacher, but has since been repackaged and re-released under this new title with a new cover and design - but the truths shared by Hendricks are timeless and powerful - and should be read by EVERY teacher!

The first law of the teacher was the best, in my opinion - if you ever stop growing today, you stop teaching tomorrow. Dr. Hendricks challenges the teacher to remain a student, to always continue learning, pursuing truth and knowledge - and to pass that thirst on to their students - far more important than any particular lesson or tidbit of information is the thirst for knowledge and truth - and that is something that is modeled for students in the lives of the teacher. If the teacher is stale, the lessons and information can't be fresh!

The Seven Laws of the Teacher are as follows:

* The Law of the Teacher - if you stop growing today, you stop teaching tomorrow.

* The Law of Education - the way people learn determines how you teach.

* The Law of Activity - maximum learning is always the result of maximum involvement.

* The Law of Communication - to truly impart information requires the building of bridges.

* The Law of the Heart - teaching that impacts is not head to head, but heart to heart.

* The Law of Encouragement - teaching tends to be most effective when the learner is properly motivated.

* The Law of Readiness - the teaching-learning process will be most effective when both student and teacher are adequately prepared.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M. Teresa on January 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
Communication and caring compassion is the key to teaching. Hendricks uses the acronym, "TEACHER," to relate his concepts. The examples of teacher-student interaction shared in his book illustrate the importance of communication and show of care that motivates students to learn. He states, "The greatest teachers are not necessarily the people up front with high visibility. They are the people who have great heart. They communicate as a total person, and they communicate to the total person of their hearers (87)." Another way to be a "person of impact," is to be "vulnerable" with one's students. Not only are communication and compassion important, but preparation. Hendricks relates, "Teaching involves a delicate balance between facts and form, between content and communication, between what you teach and how you teach it (77)." If teachers want to prepare their students to "think, learn, and work," then four skills need to be taught: "reading, writing, listening, and speaking" (48). Though this book is written for Sunday school teachers, it contains helpful suggestions for use in other teaching venues. For instance, Hendricks suggests a "self-examination" in which teachers ask three questions: "What are my strengths; what are my weaknesses, and what do I have to change?" (35). Great teachers are the ones who continue to grow in their own personal learning. Hendricks' book is a good reminder for all teachers of the main purpose for Bible teaching. Even if the teacher teaches in a secular institution, the basic principles of the book can be utilized. For instance, students will be more willing to try harder and put more effort into their school work if they know the teacher truly cares for them.

Review by M. Teresa Trascritti
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