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TERMINAL CHAOS: Why U.S. Air Travel Is Broken and How to Fix It (Library of Flight Series) Hardcover – May 9, 2008

ISBN-13: 000-1563479494 ISBN-10: 1563479494

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Product Details

  • Series: Library of Flight
  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Amer Inst of Aeronautics & (May 9, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563479494
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563479496
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,356,831 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Donohue and Shaver have taken an enormously arcane and complex set of issues and players and laid them all out very clearly and directly .... It s among the best and most thoughtful pieces written on the subject ... it s a very, very good--and mostly evenhanded--distillation of the background and causes of the current quagmire that will only worsen as time is allowed to pass with no real fixes in sight. --David V. Plavin, former Director of Airports Council International¬North America and former Director of the Port Authority of New York New and Jersey

This is a very disturbing book--and it was intended to be. For the crisis in U.S. aviation is far more serious than most people imagine. Donohue and Shaver have given us the best prescription I ve seen for fixing it. --Robert W. Poole, Jr., Director of Transportation Studies, Reason Foundation

The air transportation system is fixable but the patient needs urgent and holistic care NOW. Donohue and Shaver are the doctors, and the doctors are in! They have the knowledge and capability to work through this problem to success if we as a community want to fix the system. --Paul Fiduccia, President of the Small Aircraft Manufacturers Association

About the Author

Dr. George L. Donohue is currently a Professor of Systems Engineering and Operations Research and Director of the Center for Air Transportation Systems Research at George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia. He is also a Co-director of the FAA National Center of Excellence for Operations Research (NEXTOR). Donohue was formerly the Associate Administrator for Research and Acquisitions in the Federal Aviation Administration (1994-98) and has broad experience in managing major research and technology programs in both the public and private sector. Before joining the FAA, Donohue served as Vice President of the RAND Corporation, in Santa Monica, California, and was previously Director of the Office of Aerospace and Strategic Technology at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. He has also held technical and technical management positions at Dynamics Technology, Inc., the US Navy and NASA. Dr. Donohue has received numerous awards, such as the Secretary of Defense Meritorious Civilian Service Medal in 1977 and the Air Traffic Control Association Clifford Burton Memorial Award in 1998. He has published over 60 reports and articles and is the principal editor of Air Transportation Systems Engineering, the only reference book on the subject. He has been listed in Who s Who in America since 1992, was named one of Federal Computer Week s top 100 Executives in 1997 and was also named one of the top 100 decision makers in Washington D. C. by the National Journal in 1997. Donohue was chosen to head the United States Delegation to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Conference on Air Traffic Management Modernization in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 1998. He was also a Director of RTCA and was nominated by President Clinton to become the FAA Deputy Administrator after demonstrating substantial success in replacing the old FAA technology acquisition process and in pioneering personnel reforms at the FAA. He replaced 30 year old air traffic control computers and radar systems and initiated the new aircraft surveillance system pilot program in Alaska. This Alaska demonstration program, now called the Capstone Program, has achieved significant success in demonstrating how the new ADS-B technology can be used to safely separate aircraft with much lower air traffic controller workload. He was awarded the Embry Riddle Aeronautical University Pinnacle Award for Outstanding Individual Contribution to the art and science of Air Traffic Control for this achievement in 2007. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and holds Ph.D. and MS degrees in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Oklahoma State University and a BSME degree from the University of Houston. Dr. Donohue is also a pilot, with a single-engine private pilot s certificate.

Dr. Russell Shaver is currently a visiting research fellow in the Center for Air Transportation Systems Research at George Mason University. He was formerly a senior research analyst at the RAND Corp. He has held numerous analysis and management positions at RAND for over 35 years. From 1994 to 2000 he was the chief scientist for policy analysis at the MITRE Center for Advanced Aviation System Development (CAASD) in McLean Virginia. He holds a BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from Yale University and a Ph.D. in Applied Mechanics from the University of California at Berkeley.

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Customer Reviews

Secondly they totally ignore other, much more telling data.
R. Doug Wicker
Donohue throughout demonstrates more than adequately that he has no understanding of airline economics or of the technical issues he was supposedly responsible for.
Ron N. Butler
Apparently the authors didn't, and left that out of their factors for comparison.
John M. Thompson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By C. Collings on July 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The author really understand the complex issues that are crippling our nation's air traffic system. Very evident that he wants to spark change through this book. We can only hope that things will get better before they get worse!
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26 of 35 people found the following review helpful By John M. Thompson on June 25, 2008
Format: Hardcover
What is the difference between Schiphol, Amsterdam's international airport, and Newark?

If you noticed that Schiphol has six runways and Newark only has two, congratulations. Apparently the authors didn't, and left that out of their factors for comparison. Funny, because a runway is needed every time an aircraft takes off or lands, that they didn't think of it as miraculous that Newark can move 66% of the passengers that Schiphol does with only 33% of the runways - and with LaGuardia (14.4 miles west) and JFK (18 miles west) traffic climbing and descending through essentially the same airspace. Schiphol has no such limitation, but had 4,000 fewer traffic movements, i.e., aircraft taking off and landing. By themselves, the major national airports of western Europe compare to individual metropolitan airports of the U.S., but no European metropolitan airport is half as busy as BWI/DCA/IAD, or EWR/JFK/LGA, or LAX/LGB/BUR.

While we're discussing the difference between ourselves and Europe, let's ask ourselves what it costs to move more than twice the airplanes Europe in its entirety does: according to a Lufthansa spokesman, an average of $380 for the same Airbus that Lufthansa pays European air traffic authorities (hyper-efficient, quasi-governmental corporations, natch) $667 to take off, fly and land as of mid-June, 2008.

What is the same? Runway capacity. Here as in Europe, the average speed of a passenger jet in the last ten miles of its approach will be somewhere around 150 miles an hour, or 2.5 miles per minute. Most major airports use this separation interval because they have done a runway occupancy study, validating that an average of 50 seconds or less was required for a landing aircraft to exit the runway.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Martha Kuhlmann on July 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The book was of interest to me as an aviation writer. I found many of the points to be valid and well supported. However, the focus was far to narrow and was limited to infrastructure shortcomings. There was little attention paid to the failures of management and lack of vision. It tells part, but not all, of the story.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By K. Saade on March 7, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Great book describing the complacency of an industry that has not evolved over the past 30 years. Old regulations and old technology = inefficient results. The end user, the American flying public, ends up suffering through delays and cancellations, not to mention a generally inefficient and uncomfortable journey as a whole. Terminal Chaos exposes the weaknesses in the system and provides interesting alternatives to alleviate a growing problem. Great book to read especially if you're a frequent flyer.
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32 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Katie Barlow on June 26, 2008
Format: Hardcover
As a daughter of an ATC veteran, I know what I am talking about.

Yesterday, one review of this book appeared in which ATC/NATCA took some knocks. What did they do? Same thing they always do, deflect responsibility and attack the messenger. So all of a sudden, 4 poor reviews of the book appear from pro-NATCA people.

Until the first review appeared, NATCA was quiet. Yesterday, the NATCA blogs and mailing lists got busy, telling everyone who could to post negative reviews about the book.

That's the NATCA way, deflect responsibility, protect members at all costs, plausible denial, etc., etc.

NATCA members work hard. The bad part is their leadership is empty. We need more automation and fewer controllers, and that is what they are scared about.

As for me, I am reading this book, and it is excellent.
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14 of 23 people found the following review helpful By R. Doug Wicker on June 26, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I can only say that if the rest of the book is as rife with errors as are those portions whose true facts are known to me, it is inconcievable that the authors updated any of their research for at least the past five years in compiling this incredibly inaccurate missive.

First of all, the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (union), as described in Chapter 6, cannot possibly be an impediment to new technologies because they have been excluded from ALL technology projects for years. Indeed, the FAA no longer even negotiates with NATCA the impact and implementation of such projects. NATCA is now completely out of the loop. Additionally, since removing controllers from technology projects, the Federal Aviation Administration has not fielded even one piece of substantially new technology either on time or within budget. And projects with which NATCA previously collaborated under the previous administrator have fallen into such disarray that many facilities badly in need of upgrades have had them cancelled. Case in point: Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System, which was finally being deployed in an acceptable form under the previous administrator, but which has been all but cancelled with just a mere fraction of the total installations previously called for since controller input was no longer solicited.

The authors then go on to refute NATCA's claim that the U.S. runs the safest ATC system by stating that Europe's hull-loss rate is .032 per million departures versus .049 in the U.S. While this is technically true, it is also highly misleading. First of all, Europe does not have a thriving General Aviation community, a category which makes up the vast majority of aviation accidents. Secondly they totally ignore other, much more telling data.
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