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THE VOYAGE OF THE BEAGLE (non illustrated) [Kindle Edition]

Charles Darwin
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $7.99
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Book Description

"The Voyage of the Beagle" is Charles Darwin's journal of his experieces as a naturalist on a scientific data gathering expedition that began in December of 1831 and ended in October of 1836. He taveled around South America and into the Pacific to Australia, Tahiti and New Zealand. Throughout the journey he made very careful observations of the flora and fauna, and collected a multitude of specimens to ship back to England for future study. Much of the data he gathered on the voyage was used as the basis of the theory of evolution he later developed. (non illustrated)


Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

This book is in Electronic Paperback Format. If you view this book on any of the computer systems below, it will look like a book. Simple to run, no program to install. Just put the CD in your CDROM drive and start reading. The simple easy to use interface is child tested at pre-school levels.

Windows 3.11, Windows/95, Windows/98, OS/2 and MacIntosh and Linux with Windows Emulation.

Includes Quiet Vision's Dynamic Index. the abilty to build a index for any set of characters or words.

From the Inside Flap

In 1831, Charles Darwin embarked on an expedition that, in his own words, determined my whole career. The Voyage of the Beagle chronicles his five-year journey around the world and especially the coastal waters of South America as a naturalist on the H.M.S. Beagle. While traveling through these unexplored countries collecting specimens, Darwin began to formulate the theories of evolution and natural selection realized in his master work, The Origin of Species. Travel memoir and scientific primer alike, The Voyage of the Beagle is a lively and accessible introduction to the mind of one of history's most influential thinkers.

Product Details

  • File Size: 823 KB
  • Print Length: 504 pages
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004GKNOS0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #563,745 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
160 of 164 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Caution, this is an abridgement. December 19, 2002
Format:Paperback
I bought this version when I could not find my old copy. On trying to find a favorite passage (Darwin's revulsion at a parasitic wasp in Brazil and the inconsistency of such cruelty with any providential design of nature by a good God), I noticed that it was not there. I do not know what else is missing. I find it infuriating that this was not adequately noted on the cover of the book. I always prefer books as the author wrote them, especially when the author is Darwin. This is a lively, beautiful and haunting work that I first read when I was thirteen and have read twice since. Readers deserve the whole thing.
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73 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Charles Darwin as Indiana Jones September 27, 2004
Format:Paperback
We all know Charles Darwin as a scholarly bearded old English gentleman, and like Leonardo da Vinci, Darwin has this image defining him for all future generations. Even though most everyone knows Darwin spent five years traveling the oceans on the HMS Beagle, the image of a young dynamic Darwin never takes over. Reading this book will change this.

Darwin sailed on the Beagle, a small three-mast sailing ship, and circumnavigated the globe. Over five years, he visited numerous islands in the Atlantic and Pacific and extensively surveyed the east and west coasts of South America. He hiked up and down mountains, traveled on horseback across the arid Argentinean plains, crossed the lonely Peruvian desert, and trekked the grandiose Chilean Cordilleras. He thought nothing of packing a train of mules for a two-month overland journey across the Andes going from Chile to Argentina and back again. On all his land expeditions he hired local guides, from Gauchos in Argentina to South Pacific islanders in Tahiti. Darwin's accounts of his expeditions are not only interesting adventures, they are also good portraits of the people he met. These include Latin American governors and generals, Argentinean ranchers, very primitive natives on Tierra del Fuego, and so on.

The journal begins with an account of Cape de Verd islands, then most of the book is spent on Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, and we have to wait until Chapter 17 before we get to what all Darwin fans really want to read, namely the account of his visit to the Galapagos. Though short, the account does not disappoint. We read of Darwin's finches, of two allied species of lizards, and of the giant turtles. Darwin also presents his great insight: that geographical isolation contributes to speciation.
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65 of 68 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Penguin Version is abridged, with no warning on the cover December 17, 2003
Format:Paperback
The 1 star is for Penguin, because the cover does not warn you that the content has been sharply abridged. Darwin's thinking and writing are wonderful -- but grossly and unfairly cut to ribbons.
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39 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Charles Darwin as Indiana Jones September 27, 2004
Format:Paperback
We all know Charles Darwin as a scholarly bearded old English gentleman, and like Leonardo da Vinci, Darwin has this image defining him for all future generations. Even though most everyone knows Darwin spent five years traveling the oceans on the HMS Beagle, the image of a young dynamic Darwin never takes over. Reading this book will change this.

Darwin sailed on the Beagle, a small three-mast sailing ship, and circumnavigated the globe. Over five years, he visited numerous islands in the Atlantic and Pacific and extensively surveyed the east and west coasts of South America. He hiked up and down mountains, traveled on horseback across the arid Argentinean plains, crossed the lonely Peruvian desert, and trekked the grandiose Chilean Cordilleras. He thought nothing of packing a train of mules for a two-month overland journey across the Andes going from Chile to Argentina and back again. On all his land expeditions he hired local guides, from Gauchos in Argentina to South Pacific islanders in Tahiti. Darwin's accounts of his expeditions are not only interesting adventures, they are also good portraits of the people he met. These include Latin American governors and generals, Argentinean ranchers, very primitive natives on Tierra del Fuego, and so on.

The journal begins with an account of Cape de Verd islands, then most of the book is spent on Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, and we have to wait until Chapter 17 before we get to what all Darwin fans really want to read, namely the account of his visit to the Galapagos. Though short, the account does not disappoint. We read of Darwin's finches, of two allied species of lizards, and of the giant turtles. Darwin also presents his great insight: that geographical isolation contributes to speciation.
Read more ›
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36 of 38 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars this is the abridged version December 12, 2004
By Roxanne
Format:Paperback
This is not a review, but a warning. Browsing for copies of Darwin's journal of his voyage on the Beagle, I read the reviews below. I would point out that McEvilly says that this book is unabridged; Cliffe says it is abridged. The Penguin USA web site doesn't say which it is, but the Penguin UK site says that the text of this edition has been shortened. So if you're looking for the full text, this doesn't appear to be it.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't get the Wordsworth Edition April 1, 2000
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This is an extremely interesting book; well worth reading. However I would not recommend getting the edition published by Wordsworth (ISBN 185364768). It was not proof-read very carefully, and contains a lot of typographical errors.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Darwin's best January 4, 2003
Format:Paperback
Forget the image of the grim, ancient, grey-bearded savant. By the time those pictures were taken Darwin was long past his energetic prime. BEAGLE catches him literally starting out on his life-long voyage of discovery at a time when he was still extremely physically active and just beginning to come to grips with the seriousness of his interest in Natural History. Later in life he said that the VOYAGE was his personal favorite of all his writings, and one can see why. Darwin set off young, energetic, but frankly naieve & a little foolish (his father ahd written to him at Cambridge saying that he feared that he would never amount to much, and apart from his work with Henslow, much of his college career seems to have been devoted to what we would now call "partying hearty") He returned a seasoned naturalist and explorer, with the germ of his Great Idea firmly implanted. While in many ways VOYAGE is describing a vanished world, Darwin's keen eye for detail renders each landscape with such clarity that one feels that one is really along for the trip -and, thank goodness, some of the places he went to are still there for us to go & wonder at. There is no Big Theory here, just an enormous sense of wonder and excitement, with little of the periodic homesickness that shows up in the letters that he was writing during the voyage. Perhaps most intriguing is the remarkably SHORT section on the Galapagos -I remember thinking the first time that I read the VOYAGE "Wait, but wasn't the Galapagos THE Big Deal?" No, not to read it here in the original. One gets the sense that many of Darwins fundamental beliefs were already in gestation long before he left the coast of South America & by the time he gets to the Galapagos, he is increasingly anxious to be home & working it all out. Make sure that you get a COMPLETE version of the Voyage, there are many editions (including abbridgements) out there.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
I was also looking for "I sailed with Darwin" . I am a follower of science and the wonder.
Published 13 days ago by Ruth Samuda
5.0 out of 5 stars If you don't "believe" in evolution, then read this book!
In this book, Darwin traces his experiences as the scientist on board of British exploratory vessel. Read more
Published 5 months ago by Theia111
3.0 out of 5 stars Five stars for Darwin, but only three for this book
Reviewing this book seems a little bit like reviewing Sir Isaac Newton’s notes on optics and gravity. Were they good reading? Who cares! Read more
Published 6 months ago by Audiobook Bandit
3.0 out of 5 stars Much slower than I expected
This was not a bad book and it's certainly an important account of the Beagle's journey as told by it's most famous passenger (sorry FitzRoy) but what I had imagined as being more... Read more
Published 6 months ago by Moose
5.0 out of 5 stars Voyage into the Future
Reportedly, Charles Darwin's father opposed his voyage on the Beagle but, fearing that Charles was in danger of turning into a "hunting and fishing" country gentleman,... Read more
Published 7 months ago by Ron Braithwaite
5.0 out of 5 stars Voyage of the Beagle - A young Darwin with some fantastic ideas.
Superb book. Changed history and science - for the good! For me ends the dispute between who contributed most to theory of evolution, Darwin or Wallace? Darwin winds hands down.
Published 7 months ago by W.L.H.
5.0 out of 5 stars If Charles Darwin never wrote the "Origin of Species"
If Charles Darwin never wrote the "Origin of Species", he would be remembered as the person who wrote one of the greatest epic travel narratives. Read more
Published 8 months ago by Howard
2.0 out of 5 stars Abridged
Although this version has useful notes, I don't know why one would bother with purchasing an abridged edition. Read more
Published 9 months ago by Benedict de Spinoza
5.0 out of 5 stars History of a great voyage
This book is fascinating. So many things were documented about floria and fauna that still stands up to scrutiny. Still very current book to read. Read more
Published 11 months ago by Miss virginia
4.0 out of 5 stars Technical
I wanted to read Darwin's thoughts, but the facts are technical and I really got bored reading the book. Read more
Published 12 months ago by Margaret Civil
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