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TOPGUN on Wall Street: Why the United States Military Should Run Corporate America Hardcover – May 1, 2012


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Vanguard Press; 1 edition (May 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593157177
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593157173
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,099,043 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“This is a wonderful book—capturing an insider’s look at the elite and mysterious world of TOPGUN, that coliseum for the daredevils of the US Naval Aviation. It’s written by a fabulous F-14 fighter-wing Commander. Too modest, but real heavy on our unbreakable codes of Honesty, Integrity, Courage, and Honor. What a read!”
—Marcus Luttrell, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Lone Survivor
 

About the Author

Lieutenant Commander Jeffery Lay is a 24-year veteran of the United States Navy, United States Air Force, and Ohio Air National Guard. A graduate of the United States Naval Academy, he served a highly decorated military career flying the F-14 Tomcat and the F-16 Fighting Falcon in his nation’s defense.

An accomplished Mission Commander and graduate of the vaunted Navy Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN), he flew more than 50 combat missions, made over 400 carrier landings, and accumulated over 3,500 flight hours during three combat deployments to Southwest Asia, the Mediterranean Sea, and the Persian Gulf.

At the height of his military career, Jeff was diagnosed with an advanced form of Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Told he would never fly again,
he fought the disease with unspeakable courage, choosing to undergo an experimental form of chemotherapy. Jeff ultimately beat cancer and returned to the cockpit—fittingly—on Veteran’s Day, 1998.

Following retirement from active duty, Jeff went on to serve as a wealth advisor at Neuberger Berman—then a Lehman Brothers company. Disenchanted with the bets Lehman made, he ultimately left the ill-fated investment bank and founded a global wealth management firm in Cincinnati, Ohio based on the risk controls he learned at TOPGUN.

Today, Jeff is a trusted advisor to select families, senior executives, corporations, endowments, and foundations. A noted financial author, he mentors investment professionals on risk management, capital preservation, and asset allocation, and hosts a global financial symposium each year, recently held at the New York Stock Exchange.

Jeff is also a highly sought after speaker for his expertise in aviation, business, finance, and motivation. A recipient of the University of Cincinnati Award for Entrepreneurial Excellence, he works with an exclusive list of clientele who appreciate his ability to see and manage risk in the most demanding, high performance environments imaginable.

Patrick Robinson is the co-author of the New York Times #1 nonfiction bestseller Lone Survivor. He is also the author of seven
international bestselling suspense thrillers, including Intercept, Diamondhead, To the Death, and The Delta Solution, as well as
several nonfiction bestsellers, including his New York Times bestseller, A Colossal Failure of Common Sense: The Inside Story
of the Collapse of Lehman Brothers
. He lives in Ireland and spends his summers in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.


More About the Author

Jeffery Lay is a 24-year veteran of the United States Navy, United States Air Force, and Ohio Air National Guard. A graduate of the United States Naval Academy, he served a highly decorated military career flying the F-14 Tomcat and the F-16 Fighting Falcon in his nation's defense.

An accomplished Mission Commander and graduate of the vaunted Navy Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN), he flew more than 50 combat missions, made over 400 carrier landings and accumulated over 3,500 flight hours during three combat deployments to Southwest Asia, the Mediterranean Sea, and the Persian Gulf.

At the height of his military career, Jeff was diagnosed with an advanced form of Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Told he would never fly again, he fought the disease with unspeakable courage, choosing to undergo an experimental form of chemotherapy. Jeff ultimately beat cancer and returned to the cockpit - fittingly - on Veteran's Day, 1998.

Today, Jeff is a highly sought after speaker for his expertise in aviation, business, finance, and motivation. A recipient of the University of Cincinnati Award for Entrepreneurial Excellence, he works with an exclusive list of clientele who appreciate his ability to see and manage risk in the most demanding, high performance organizations.

Connect with him @jefferylay | facebook.com/jefferyelay

For more information about TOPGUN on Wall Street - Why the United States Military Should Run Corporate America, see jefferylay.com/topgun.

Customer Reviews

Finally, Stalin was a soldier too.
dzounz
Here is a very well-written guide for the "wizards of wall street" from someone who KNOWS right from wrong, THE US NAVY way.
Carl F. Austerlitz
I couldn't agree with most of his conclusions.
Donald J. Meier

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Eric Shuler on May 20, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Topgun on Wall Street Why the United States Military Should run Corporate America This title definitely catches your attention. I was intrigued and did not know what to expect. The book is only 311 pages and reads very fast. I read the book in little over two days. The author in 260 pages tells you about his military career and how he became a Top Gun pilot while flying F-14 Tomcats. The F-14 at the time was one of the most advanced fighter planes in the world and one of the heaviest. I am always amazed at seeing pictures of it being catapulted from a aircraft carrier and then landing on the deck

One of the lessons Jeffrey Lay presents is how he was trained and then re trained to recognize risks and how to survive in hostile situations. As you read the book you will realize how special a Top Gun pilots is. He presents the numbers that for every Topgun pilot there are about a 100,000 that are not selected.

Another lesson is to learn everything about a situation and to overcome a difficulty with training and knowledge. He was diagnosed with cancer which he over came . He later fought his permanent grounding and retiring to flying status and was able to fly the F-14. He talks about his decision to leave the Navy and then go into the finance world. He also switched to the Air National Guard and started flying F-16 fighters where and he was later promoted to Lieutenant Colonel.

The rest of the book deals with his working in the finance world and how his military training prepared him. He believes that had others his training the mortgage crash of 2008 would not have happened.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By JC on May 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Just finished Jeff's book - great read. As an ex. aviator (very minor accomplishments in comparison - (I flew ASK 21 gliders in the UK Air Cadets and did a fair amount of powered aerobatics in Dehavilland Chipmunks), I really enjoyed the insight into the US Navy's training of its "sharp-end" officers. I think Jeff does a great job weaving the two subject matters together in a way that clearly makes a very salient point. I also am grateful that while reading Jeff's book the subject of honesty came up at our dining table; I have an 11 year old son. Jeff gave me a good reference to talk about - and hopefully hammer home some very important life lessons.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Steve Dietrich VINE VOICE on November 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I liked this book. It focuses on a number of the problems which plague our political and business world and which they are attempting to contaminate the military. Some of the word selection was a little over the top but I'll blame that on the co author.

Lay identifies the reasons why the military is so good at leadership and problem solving while Wall Street and government do so poorly. My background includes 30 years of flying light aircraft, a lot of offshore sailing and some years teaching young MBA's as adjunct faculty at a major university.

The author presents a convincing case as to why our military culture is so much stronger than our political and business culture. The discipline of our military academies (both in action and in thinking) is something that needs to be brought back into politics and business. Imagine a business meeting with 30 participants where a junior exec stands up and explains that the boss did something really stupid, but in an environment that is seeking to eliminate stupidity. Chances are that the junior needs to polish his resume

A few years before Lay's tour over Iraq I was fortunate to do the Tiger Cruise on the Stennis as it sailed from the middle east to San Diego via Hawaii. I met the ship expecting to be blown away by the airplanes and the ship itself. My nephew was ops officer of one of the F-14 squadrons. The airplanes and ship were fantastic, however what was most impressive was the quality of leadership from the skipper down to the 18 year olds on the flight deck. There was no look of listlessness so often seen in the eyes of idle youth, the young people, who often looked like they were not old enough to drive worked as a team and teams of teams to operate the flight deck. They moved with pride and purpose.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jimmy Verona on September 15, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As someone serving in the military who isn't fond of Wall Street, this title appealed to me instantly. But the book itself seems to have one main point; in order to be a TOPGUN pilot, one has to be disciplined. There are no such requirements for working on Wall Street.
That seems to be the point when the author stays on topic, at least. The rest of the time, the book seems to be about how awesome TOPGUN pilots are. Several chapters are devoted to the rigorous training pilots must go through, or accounts of specific military actions (or inaction). As a military aviator myself, I did find this interesting. I just didn't think it had anything to do with the main topic of the novel.
I absolutely think Lieutenant Commander Jefferey Lay knows what he is talking about. Butg he also comes across as extremely arrogant and biased. If you want to read a book about how awesome it is to be a TOPGUN pilot and how everyone else is sub-par, this is for you. If you want to read a book with actual suggestions about how to fix the economy, or what the military could do to help ... you might want to look elsewhere.
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