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4.7 out of 5 stars
TP-LINK TL-SG1016  10/100/1000Mbps 16-Port Gigabit 17.3-inch Rackmountable Switch, 32Gbps Capacity
Size Name: 16 Port RackStyle Name: UnmanagedChange
Price:$64.57 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
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118 of 128 people found the following review helpful
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
When it comes to unmanaged home gigabit ethernet switches, there isn't really much these days that would set one brand apart from another. Gigabit switches pretty much just sit there and do what they are supposed to do without notice, if they are built right. The specs for gigabit switching haven't changed at all over the years, so manufacturers have had to find other ways to set themselves apart. The battlefront these days seems to be who can build switches the smallest, the cheapest or use the least amount of power. TP-Link seems to have settled on the latter, with the release of it's 8 port TL-SG108 gigabit ethernet switch.

So, the question is... Did TP-LINK actually build a switch that uses less power than other models? Yes, they did. Although the tests I conducted were not under sterile, laboratory conditions, they are certainly accurate enough to show that the TP-Link switch uses significantly less power than switches sold just 2-3 years ago. Running idle (no connections or traffic) the TL-SG108 barely draws any current at all. Perhaps 1 Watt, at most, which is most likely consumed by the LEDs it displays to indicate that it is operational. This is a tad better than switches made a generation ago, but consistent with most other desktop switches made these days.

Under a full network load, the most power that I saw the switch consume was about 4 Watts. I used a consumer Kill-A-Watt brand power meter for testing purposes and set out to test some other 8 port desktop gigabit ethernet switches that I had at my office. Using the same ethernet connections on the same network (representing a similar network load) a handful of the newest switches I tested consumed roughly equal amounts of power. Specifically, I tested models including the TrendNet TEG-S8g, TrendNet TEG-S80g and Zyxel GS108B. All of these models have similar form factors and features and are from the latest generation of each company's products. All seemed to fluctuate between 2 to 4 Watts of power, depending upon the network load at that particular moment. In this sense, the TP-Link TL-SG108 doesn't really stand out above the rest, but it definitely hangs in there with the best of them. The other models I tested also boasted consuming "less power". I suspect that most current models sold these days would be similar in power consumption though.

Compared to previous generations of gigabit ethernet switches, the TP-Link TL-SG108 fared much better. In particular, I put a switch that is still active on our network to the test and the results were impressive. In particular, I tested a 3COM 8 port OfficeConnect model 1670800a gigabit ethernet switch and found that it consumed anywhere from 4-8 Watts under the same load. That's close to twice the power consumed by the TP-Link. Similarly, a Netgear GS605 5 port gigabit ethernet switch (definitely not one of their newer models) had a pretty constant load of about 7 Watts under the same conditions. With fewer ports and close to same size, I expected the Netgear to do a bit better, but the meter doesn't lie. I suspect that the Netgear switch is probably about 5 years old. I didn't have any other, older gigabit ethernet switches left to test, but I suspect that the results would have been roughly similar.

What it all boils down to seems to be that if you are using an older, gigabit ethernet switch you could save 50% (maybe more, maybe less) on your electricity costs by switching to a TP-LINK TL-SG108 or a similar model based upon recent advancements in technology. In real-world terms, we are talking about 5 Watts max. Over the course of a year, this would amount to (at most) about $1 in savings as of this writing. Obviously, if you have an older gigabit switch in place, running out and buying a new one isn't going to pay for itself anytime soon and will just consume more landfill space, if you care about that sort of thing. If you need to buy a new gigabit switch anyway though, the TP-Link TL-SG108 is definitely one of the lowest power-consuming models you will find on the market these days. It compares very favorably to similar models that sell for higher prices. It seems very solidly built and considering the fact that it contains no moving parts, one should expect it to last longer than the amount of time it will take to make gigabit switching technology obsolete.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon July 26, 2013
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I used this to replace a 5 port gigabit unmanaged switch. What I like about the unit is that it is very compact (see photo vs. trend net 5 port gigabit green switch), very much plug & play and sturdy (steel design). It works as expected with ultrafast connection (no noticeable difference vs. trendnet).

All in all a great product.

4/5 stars for compact size, plug & play (unmanaged), and steel frame case.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on July 29, 2014
Size Name: 8 Port DesktopStyle Name: Easy SmartVerified Purchase
I was setting up a pfSense firewall on an old Thinkpad with only one wired NIC. This setup pretty much required 802.1q VLANs to work, so I got this switch.

The switch is fast, quiet, and it just works. It has some really nice features that I'd only expect to see in much more expensive equipment like: Port Mirroring, IGMP snooping (for multicast), loop prevention, ect. It even has a simple cable test utility that checks if the cable is "Open" or "Normal" and gives you an estimated length in meters.

Now, as I've said, the real reason I got it was for 802.1q tagged VLANs- and this works great. I just want to point out an oddity compared to other more expensive switches that I've used... the PVID setting. Tagged/untagged ports should be familiar to anyone who uses enterprise switches. But the gotchya is that an untagged port setting only controls what VLAN can leave the port in an untagged state. Untagged traffic entering the port is assigned the port's PVID (port VLAN ID). So, if I have a port untagged in VLAN10, it's important that you also set the PVID for that port to 10 as well so that incoming traffic gets into VLAN 10.
I'm not sure why you'd ever want a PVID that's different from your untagged VLAN, but maybe someone smarter than me can come up with a reason....

Regardless, is this the best switch money can buy? Nah. But for the price range it's going for- it's amazing!

Update: Nearly 6 months later, and it's still going strong.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
on August 1, 2014
Size Name: 8 Port DesktopStyle Name: Easy Smart
Since no one has written a review on this switch yet, I figured I'd give it a go.

It's a really great 8-port managed switch in my opinion. Does everything I want it to do, VLANS, QoS, Port Aggregation, and a lot more. Plus, it's gigabit, and managed, or "Web Smart" as they like to call it. No console, but there is a neat little utility it comes with to configure everything. Also, a neat feature that it has is a "Cable Test." it can diagnose Ethernet cables for you, tell you if they are crossed over, split pair, length to fault, etc... I found out that one of my cables was bad using this feature, which I thought was good and still somehow worked.

It runs great. Haven't noticed any issues what so ever, nor any reduction in speed. I've run some network speed tests, and get the same results through the switch as if I connected directly to the server.

On mine, all 8 ports are already connected, it's it is pretty much fully loaded most of the time. I also own this switches older brother, the TP-Link TL-SG1016DE 16 Port Switch. They are both from the same product family, and work great together. Have them both set up together with LAGG.

This only con, at least for me, is that this switch DOES NOT have a web based management interface. You need to use the software utility that is included on the disk, or which you can download from TP-Link's website. You just get a blank page when you try to access the switch through a regular browser. It's a bit of a pain if you need to make a quick change from a different computer, but realistically, once you set up your configuration, you probably won't be making a lot of changes for the most part.

The TP-Link TL-SG1016DE and TP-Link TL-SG1024DE both can be managed through a browser, or the utility. It just struck me as strange that the two larger switches in the same product family have this capability, but this one doesn't. But regardless, the Utility itself works fine.

Overall, a great managed switch at a great price if you need something more advanced for your home/small business network than a regular unmanaged switch. You won't find anything better at this price.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on September 27, 2012
Size Name: 24 Port Desktop/RackStyle Name: UnmanagedVerified Purchase
The TP-Link TL-SG1024D unmanaged switch did not connect correctly with some gigabit devices on the network, connecting at 100mb whether device was set for auto or 1000mb, and it seemed to have problems with jumbo frames. Since it is an unmanaged switch there was not much to do to tweak it. I suspect it would be fine in most environments where it is the only switch and the network is confined to one physical location. The price is certainly attractive. The vendor, Datavision Computer Video, issued an RMA almost immediately and was superb throughout the return process.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on May 28, 2014
Size Name: 16 Port RackStyle Name: UnmanagedVerified Purchase
I've had pretty severe functionality issues with my TiVO Premier 4 for over a year. I went through every support channel I could find for nearly a year, and the issues could not be resolved. I started using a Samsung smart TV on this device instead of my WiFI at some point, and started having issues with it as well.

Overtime, I noticed other connectivity related issues where I would have to reboot every networking device in my house to resolve them as well. I'm pretty sure it was MAC table related or something along that line.

Samsung forums started hinting that TPLink modems caused problems with Samsung TVs, so it made me think that the switch might have a similar issue.

Case and point, I replaced this thing with a Cisco SG-200 series small business switch, turned on my TV and my TiVO, and every problem with both related to internet connectivity IMMEDIATELY disappeared. My TiVO was having severe issues for over a year and it IMMEDIATELY resolved both devices problems.

You get what you pay for.

Stay away from this thing, it's doing something funny.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Size Name: 24 Port Desktop/RackStyle Name: UnmanagedVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Having setup many types of switches in my professional career, and also having purchased a number of them for home over the years, I have a good idea what to expect out of an unmanaged this switch like this. In short, I have never used a TP-Link product before, but I am impressed.

With a switch like this, which you might use on a desktop or even nearby any space that you might be working for a period of time, you want it to be noiseless. This switch is quiet. This is perfect, since with newer height adjustable desks, I like to mount a switch on the underside in order to get wired connectivity for a number of devices while running a single ethernet cable to the desk (preventing a spaghetti of wires from getting pulled up and down when the desk hieght is changed. This switch works perfectly for that application.

Since this is an unmanaged switch, you can essentially plug it in and use it. Plug the power in and run your ethernet connection to it, either from your router or other network device. You can then simply plug in any other device you want to run within that network, such as a media server, printer, Apple TV, or wireless router. As with any switch, this one has lights that will indicate connectivity and activity for each port that is actively in use.

This switch does cast off some heat, although it's not a great deal. If you plan on placing this within a small space or closet, you'll want to ensure it has enough airspace and flow to spread the heat around. I would not expect this to be a huge problem, but something to be aware of.

The fact that this switch supports jumbo frames is surprising and puts it within the small business switch category (in my view). Home users will normally not need this feature, but a small business that needs network connectivity to an iSCSI array, for example, will find this feature a real bonus.

A small downside that really doesn't create an issue today, is the apparent lack of IPv6 support. Today, I don't see that as an issue (IPv6 is complicated and not for the home user), but some small businesses may want to consider this in their long-term plans. Personally, you'll get the value from this switch before IPv6 becomes an issue to consider - so, don't let this turn you away.

Traffic flow seemed great, but I really didn't have the means to push this switch to its limits. I did move some large video files, a couple of hundred GB worth, and didn't find any problems.

Bottom line: If you need a single switch for your home or small business network, and you want something that is simple to setup and will get the job done, defiantly consider this one. If you want to integrate this switch within a small business network, I would suggest that you have a managed switch upstream to help manage traffic flow - although this is not a necessity for all environments.
If you have a need for jumbo frames and don't want to spend a great deal on a switch, this one is worth it.

Lastly, if you are a small business and think you'll be making the move to IPv6 in the next year or so, you might want to look at a managed switch instead, but as I said you'll likely get the value from this one before that becomes a concern.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on May 19, 2014
Size Name: 24 Port Desktop/RackStyle Name: Easy SmartVerified Purchase
This switch has replaced a bunch of cascaded unmanaged switches on my home network. The network ran fine with the unmanaged switches, but I really wanted a switch with 802.1q (VLAN and QoS) support, though I was having trouble justifying paying $150 more for an L2 smart switch than an unmanaged one. This one was a perfect fit for my budget and needs, and I would recommend it for any advanced home network or simple office network.

I did dock it one star for lack of IPv6 support: it will pass IPv6 traffic, but you can't assign the switch itself an IPv6 address. That's just an unforgivable omission on any networking device being sold in 2014. Maybe TP-LINK will fix this in a future firmware update.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on August 12, 2014
Size Name: 8 Port DesktopStyle Name: Easy SmartVerified Purchase
The switch itself works well, but it requires Windows to set up with the included software, there's no way to set up the switch with OSX or Linux. It doesn't have a web interface like some other smart switches do, it can only be configured using the included software.

I ended up running the software under Wine on Linux, it wasn't a great experience, the fonts were hard to read, but it worked well enough to set up the switch.

The switch discovery and software setup appears to work from any port on the switch regardless of any VLAN assignments, so it's not all that secure - if anyone on any of the switch ports can guess your administration password, they can take over the switch. I wouldn't trust this to secure a network against potentially malicious users or for segmenting WAN traffic with a VLAN, but for "convenience" VLAN's in an home or small-office, it should be fine.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Size Name: 16 Port Desktop/RackStyle Name: UnmanagedVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I've always used the "consumer" switches/hubs and decided to give this rack-mountable unit a try. It is a fairly large box, much larger than a typical unit found on Amazon. Note that it does include its own transformer, however, so there is no "wallwart" to cram into your overstuffed powerstrip. It does have a more commercial feel: it comes with brackets to mount on an equipment rack (rubber feet, too) and it has a more detailed instruction book that talks about unlikely issues for most households (different grounding systems, etc.). The sixteen RJ-45 ports are great, since most of us are always running short of ports as we get more and more networkable gizmos. Everything, other than the power cord, is front facing. This is slick design that saves the consumer from having to do arm gymnastics to plug/unplug cables behind a unit. Note that the power cord does need several inches of clearance. Overall it is a solid unit with plenty of capacity and the flexibility to rack mount. I've been running several PC's, a backup server, two TiVo's and three printers and have not seen any issues as I move data around.
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