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226 of 233 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quiet, fast, and low power as promised
Recently we have installed network storage devices, and started to run backups and multi-media services on our home LAN (local area network). As a result the load on our network increased substantially. We decided to upgrade from fast ethernet to gigabit. Due to the arrangement of devices, we have several 8 port switches connected to a larger 24 bit switch which I guess...
Published on August 28, 2009 by Pilchard

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59 of 66 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Two defective units - randomly stops forwarding: design/firmware flaw?
In mid-November I ordered one of these for a small-office client to replace a Linksys/Cisco SRW2008 which the office had outgrown. I chose the TEG-S16Dg based on the fact that the office didn't need a managed switch, its excellent price-per-port when compared to other unmanaged switches, and its consistently-positive reviews both here and elsewhere. In this office there...
Published on January 3, 2012 by Thomas M. Coyle


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226 of 233 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quiet, fast, and low power as promised, August 28, 2009
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This review is from: TRENDnet 8-Port Unmanaged Gigabit GREENnet Desktop Metal Housing Switch, TEG-S80g (Personal Computers)
Recently we have installed network storage devices, and started to run backups and multi-media services on our home LAN (local area network). As a result the load on our network increased substantially. We decided to upgrade from fast ethernet to gigabit. Due to the arrangement of devices, we have several 8 port switches connected to a larger 24 bit switch which I guess is the backbone of our LAN.

When shopping for gigabit switches, the Trendnet 8 port gigabit greennet switch came up as not only a low cost, but also a low power switch. We purchased several and have been using them for almost half a year.

These switches are silent (there is no fan), and very low power (on my Killowatt meter they always show 0 watts), and very fast. They have limited support for jumbo packets (I forget the exact number, but its around a jumbo packet size of 7-9K).

This is a good solution as a low power, silent, gigabit switch that runs cool and is low cost. The switch is unmanaged, but does have status indicator lights. You will see if you are getting fast ethernet or gigabit speeds on each port. We have had no trouble with these switches.
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107 of 108 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just works, never have to touch it!, February 28, 2011
By 
I upgraded from an 8 port Gigabit Trendnet switch to this bad boy with 16 ports. I've got 15/16 used up and it's never let me down. I can easily get transfer speeds between my two gigabit desktops of around 90-110 MB/s (using 7200RPM and SSD Hard Drives#.

All I had to do was plug in my ethernet cables, turn the power on and haven't touched it since. Reliable and fast connection for all the devices on my home network.

No fan inside, it doesn't run hot even in a wall box and it's completely silent.

LED's on the front will tell you if a device is connected and if it's Green it's connected at Gigabit and Amber if it's 10/100.

Very satisfied with the purchase and would recommend to anyone looking to venture to the Gigabit realm. FYI you will need Gigabit ethernet cards on the computers that you want to connect to the network to get Gigabit speeds #125MB/s vs 12.5MB/s on 10/100# so don't expect your 3-4 year old Desktop to connect at gigabit speeds. But don't fret, gigabit NIC's are pretty cheap, I got this low profile #for slim computers# Dynex - Gigabit PCI Desktop Adapter DX-PCIGB used for about $6 on Amazon #3rd party seller#, but you can just search "Gigabit ethernet card" and find them new for around $10-$15 new with full size bracket# Make sure it says Gigabit or 10/100/1000 in the title though as Gigabit is for some reason a key word on some 10/100 cards#

If you're wondering what you'll gain from going gigabit, here's a brief overview of bits and Bytes and 10/100 vs 10/100/1000 #gigabit#:

MB = Mega Bytes, Mb = Mega Bits. 8 bits in 1 Byte

You have a 100 MB file. If you transfer at 100 Mb/s it will download in 12.5 seconds.

If you have a 100 MB file and you transfer it at 100 MB/s, it will transfer in 1 second.

If your Internet provider says you can download at speeds up to 8 Mb/s. That means you can download 1 MB in 1 second.

If your Internet provider says you can download at speeds up to 16 Mb/s. That means you can download 2 MB in 1 second.

Transfer speed on a 10/100 router would be up to 12.5 MB/s.

Transfer speed on a 10/100/1000 #gigabit# router would be up to 125 MB/s.

Say you have a DVD rip that is 2.5GB, on a hard wire connection between 2 gigabit computers it would take roughly 20 seconds to transfer. On a 10/100 connection it would take about 3 minutes and 20 seconds.

Say you have a 1080p MKV video file that is 32GB, on a hard wire connection between 2 gigabit computers it would take roughly 4 minutes and 16 seconds to transfer. On a 10/100 connection it would take about 42 minutes and 40 seconds.

Note: These are theoretical speeds and much depends on your processing speed and also your hard drive speed.

If you have any questions just comment, I get automatic e-mail notifications on comments and will answer questions as quickly as possible.

--------------------------------------------

Update 03/01/2012:

It's been a year now since it's been installed and left in the wall. Never had an issue with it this whole time, even with power outages, lighting strikes #killed my Xbox#, it has been rock solid. Still highly recommended.

--------------------------------------------

Update 04/13/2013:

Another year and still no issues. I took it out of the wall when I moved and now it's located on a shelf in my laundry room which can get quite humid when the dryer runs and still running like a champ.
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145 of 149 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What Netgear USED to be...., July 17, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: TRENDnet 8-Port Unmanaged Gigabit GREENnet Desktop Metal Housing Switch, TEG-S80g (Personal Computers)
This switch is solid. In 3 months, I've had no problems with this Trendnet switch.

Compare to my netgear crashes, gets into reboot loops, etc even after power brick and switch replacement.

The Trendnet switch runs cooler than the netgear counterpart.

The Trendnet, like the NetGear, has a metal case for better EMI control. The netgear case is just slightly thicker, which should provide better in-case ventilation.

The Trendnet switch has ports/power on the back, and activity/connection LEDs on the front. Because of this, it makes for a much more tidy desk, and easier to see link lights.

We'll see how this is doing when it's a year, or 18 months old, but so far, it's power-on durability exceeds the competition.

NOTE: This is an unmanaged switch. 10/100/1000 line speed, auto-crossover. There is no monitoring port, no web management, no SNMP, no IP sharing, and no routing.

This is a low cost, and well designed device. I highly recommend it.
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155 of 165 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast, affordable, economical, June 27, 2010
By 
Wayne (Silicon Valley, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: TRENDnet 8-Port Unmanaged Gigabit GREENnet Desktop Metal Housing Switch, TEG-S80g (Personal Computers)
This switch is well built with a metal case, performs well, and is economical. I did lots of benchmarks and found that I got maximum speeds while doing multiple concurrent large inter-computer file transfers. I repeated some of the tests while bypassing the switch to see if there was a change in speed and there was none, so this switch kept up with whatever I could throw at it. If you want more speed, chances are you will gain more with better cables/plugs/jacks/etc. rather than looking for a faster switch.

I also used a Kill-A-Watt meter to see how much energy this uses. The amount was so low that it took days to get meaningful readings, and this will cost pennies a year and electricity is not cheap where I live. Also, the switch is economically priced. This switch caused my network diagnostic to misreport cable quality as poor, but although some utilities might give you false readings, your connection will not suffer.

I read elsewhere that this switch is not compatible with WOL (wake on LAN/magic packet) and the person who posted that got the information from Trendnet support. It turns out that this works PERFECTLY with WOL as long as your computer's port is set to auto negotiation. In other words, if there's any limitation, it's with the quality of tech support, not with this switch.

The only minor negatives are that the printing next to the LEDs is not on both sides, so it will appear upside-down if this is wall mounted, making it awkward to keep track of port numbers. Also, the slots for wall mounting could have been bigger to accommodate larger screws. The documentation is minimal, but this is pretty much plug and play.

UPDATE Jan 2011. I have read comments from customers who have had problems using multiple switches of this model on the same network. I have three of them. One is connected with approximately 25 meters of Cat-5e cable to another on a different floor in my home. The cable run is UTP, about half vertical, and half horizontal though an attic with no shielding (except distance) from other cables such as power cables. A third switch is connected with approximately 8 inches of the same type cable, allowing me to have more ports in that location. Benchmarks of file transfers will not give a true picture, since the weakest link (hard drive speed, overhead from data encapsulation, switches, network cards, wall jacks, drivers, cable, etc.) will be the limiting factor. All other parts of the chain will perform at least as well as the benchmark suggests.

I tried copying about 450 GB of relatively large and barely compressible data coming from images of blu-ray and DVD sources. Transferring through all three switches, full length of the cable, etc. gave me transfer speeds of about 96MB/sec. Presumably, the hard disk arrays are the limiting factors in my system, but the switches clearly had no trouble with those sustained speeds. I used Windows 7 drag and drop over a network, which is not among the most efficient methods. A series of smaller files such as JPEGs gave me "speeds" closer to 15MB/sec, which really means that the speed over the wire was probably about the same, but a large amount of the data was overhead encapsulation.

Although it's likely that the switch was not the limiting factor, it's clear that users who are getting poorer performance have other factors that limit performance, making it impossible to say that the switches are the cause of their performance issues. A direct run of cable from one of the computers to the other, bypassing all three switches, would show if there were any increase in performance, thus showing if the switches themselves (or something related to plugs, cables, or jacks) caused the problems. But the speeds I got from several such tests were consistent, and higher than what I would have expected given that I used Windows drag and drop over a network.
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50 of 50 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solid performance in my home network, March 20, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I bought two of these TRENDnet switches (a 5 port and an 8 port) when I upgraded our home network from 100 Mbps to 1 Gbps speed. I'm very happy with their performance and stability. I haven't had to think of them once since connecting them to the network. Both switches are connected to a D-Link DIR-655 Router: one with 100 feet of CAT-6 cable and the other with 25 feet.

This switch isn't very large - about the size of a paperback book. I've uploaded a picture to the product page to give you an idea of its relative size. The measurement from our Kill A Watt meter agrees with what others have already noted; this switch uses very little power. The lights on the front are helpful: green indicates a 1 Gbps connection while amber means a 100 Mbps connection.

To get a measure of speed through the switch I copied a 26 GB file between two computers connected to the same switch using drag and drop in Windows Explorer. Average speed for the transfer was 102 MB/sec. That was before enabling jumbo frames on the source and target computers.

This router supports jumbo frames up to 9216 bytes. In real world performance I achieved best performance with the computers configured for 4k frames. Between two Windows 7 64-bit computers I averaged 114 MB/sec tranferring the 26 GB file. Between a Windows 7 computer and a Windows Home Server (version 1) I averaged 109 MB/sec.

To enable jumbo frame support in Windows, right-click on Computer and select Manage. Click on Device Manager, open Network Adapters, right-click on your adapter and select Properties. Under the Advanced tab select Jumbo Frame and choose an appropriate value. Note this only applies to wired adapters; wireless connections don't support jumbo frames.

I've got absolutely no complaints about this switch. It's a great value and perfect for our home network.
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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely fantastic zero-config switch, June 5, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I'm in shock with how flawlessly and easily this device works.

I already have a mildly complicated network set up, with cable internet going to a wireless 802.11n-only router which also has four ports connecting to rooms throughout the house; another router is dedicated to broadcasting in 802.11b/g and offering AirTunes functionality (it receives music broadcast over the network). I purchased this device to allow two computers in one room to connect to the network & Internet via ethernet.

Little did I realize how simple it would be.

All I had to do was connect (any!) port on this TrendNet switch to the wall Ethernet connector and (any!) other ports on the device to the two computers in the room. Both computers immediately joined the network and had Internet connectivity. As expected, the device indicated the two local computers had gigabit connectivity, but only 100MBps connectivity to the main router (the in-wall wiring is not Gigabit-capable).

Besides its zero-config juju, I also really like the little rubber feet on the device; its solid-feeling metal build; its very informative LEDs; and its blazing speed.
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59 of 66 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Two defective units - randomly stops forwarding: design/firmware flaw?, January 3, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
In mid-November I ordered one of these for a small-office client to replace a Linksys/Cisco SRW2008 which the office had outgrown. I chose the TEG-S16Dg based on the fact that the office didn't need a managed switch, its excellent price-per-port when compared to other unmanaged switches, and its consistently-positive reviews both here and elsewhere. In this office there are 10 users backed by a Real Server, with consistent high-bandwidth utilization (lots of large document and image manipulation and cataloging). Given that the switch is unmanaged, installation is indeed plug-and-play. My observations were that the performance was on-par with the Cisco, and there were no issues with either Auto or hard-coding speed and duplex on the server, network peripherals, and client machines. All in all, a great box at a great price.

And then the problem started.

One month after installation, after running 24x7 with no issues, the switch just stopped forwarding between certain ports. The links didn't actually go down and there were no other indications of a failure, but random devices just couldn't connect any longer to random other devices. Bounce the switch and all was well for about 10 minutes, and then the problem started again. I say "random" above because there didn't seem to be any consistency about what ports would be affected, except in the case of the server - in all cases, that port would stop forwarding (whichever port it happened to be - I did try a number of different ports) - but otherwise, random devices among all 16 ports would be affected (not even in a particular port bank, which is a common failure mode), and the next failure after reboot would affect different ports, which ports would remain affected until the next boot. An investigation of the server revealed no warnings or issues, and I concluded with changing both the NIC and the cables just for giggles. No effect - same problem.

I order from Amazon primarily because of Prime, their wonderful return policy, and excellent support reps. I received a same-model replacement right away, installed it, sent the bad one back, and, after a couple weeks of solid performance, chalked it up to a one-off bad unit. No such luck. The exact same issue has now occurred with the new unit.

I called TrendNet support. They claim no knowledge or reports of this issue, and given that the switch is unmanaged, there's no user-serviceable action that can be taken, such as a firmware upgrade. Googling also offers no reports of such a problem.

Given that lack of reports, and given the unlikelihood that I've received two bad switches with identical failure modes, my conclusion is that there is a design flaw in the product that can't handle some event that's happening in this environment (though I can correlate no such event with these failures), which Trend missed in their design and QA.

Since this is a consumer- or small-business oriented switch, it's unlikely that most customers will be pushing as much data through it as consistently as my client's environment, so perhaps that's a contributor. Otherwise, the only thing that stands out is Trend's "GREENnet" technology which reduces power utilization per port based primarily on cable length - perhaps there's something unusual in that technology that's having trouble either with my cables (all Cat6 500Mhz both for endpoints and for premise-punchdown with a maximum switch-to-client distance of 12 meters through two punchdowns, and short-run Cat6 500Mhz direct cabling to the server and other gear in the IDF closet itself), some other obscure item like MTU, a problem with heat (there is no dedicated AC in the IDF but the temperature remains constant at about 80F, which should be perfectly fine) or some combination of the above. Either way, given that everything in my architecture is designed correctly, was working perfectly with the SRW2008 24x7 for over a year, and, again, has worked perfectly with each of these Trend switches - until they die in this decidedly-odd fashion - I must conclude that there is a design flaw. While it's possible that I received a pair of bad switches (maybe there was an issue with one batch in manufacturing), TrendNet hasn't acknowledged such an issue. I'm certainly not going to waste any more time trying a third one of these.

For now, I've placed the SRW2008 back in service, chained to a dumb 10/100 switch for a few low-bandwidth endpoints, until I decide on a replacement device. Given Trend's overall-excellent reputation and reviews, I'm willing to give them another chance, but only with a device with a different architecture. The main contender right now is their TEG-160WS, which is managed, does NOT have GREENnet, and is only about $50 more. I'll write an update if I do go with that unit.

*2/13/12 Update: I ended up replacing the TEG-S16Dg with the latest "big brother" of the SRW2008, the Cisco Sg 200-18 18-PORT Gigabit. Despite the much higher price of admission, I wanted the management and monitoring capability (which is absurdly extensive given the target audience of small businesses) and the Cisco reliability to which I'm accustomed from my large datacenter implementations. For once, it seems like a manufacturer managed to integrate an acquisition - Linksys in this case - very well; while this product's origins were as a high-end Linksys and ended up as a low-end Cisco, the throughput, reliability (so far), configuration options, and other various bells and whistles make this switch a relative bargain. Note that it too offers the "green ethernet" option (I hadn't been aware of this initiative and how widespread it's become), but I've disabled it for now (+1 for highly-configurable managed switches); if the switch survives through the end of the month I'll turn it on to see what happens - I haven't yet discounted that there might be something unusual happening in the environment with an IP phone or desktop dumb switch that's causing the low-power / cable length detection to go wonky.

*6/26/12 Update: Except for configuration-change-necessitated reboots, the Cisco has been running 24x7 since I installed it with zero issues. So, unless Trend has finally acknowledged and/or fixed their design flaw, skip this and buy the Cisco.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This device solved my AV network problem, July 6, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This router solved a digital interference problem that occurred when I plugged network AV devices into the network port of my uVerse set-top box.

I had been using a powerline network adapter to connect internet to my network enabled DVD player, TV and home theater PC (HTPC). For video, powerline networking is a slow connection, even though this powerline adapter was advertised as good for video. However, I frequently saw that my streaming Netflix was dropping back to a low bandwidth connection because the powerline network adapter couldn't provide the bandwidth required to stream HD from Netflix.

Recently I subscribed to AT&T uVerse, and I discovered that the uVerse set-top box had a network output port. So I plugged the HTPC into that, did some DSL speed tests and discovered that the uVerse network connection was a lot faster than the powerline adapter. Apparently the uVerse box gets it's internet connection via the video coax cable.

So I ordered the TrendNet router just to split the internet signal from the uVerse box to all three audio/video devices. A gigabit switch is overkill for that purpose, but the price was right, and it's nice to have technical headroom as well as some future-proofing.

While waiting for the router to arrive, I left my HTPC connected directly to the network port on the uVerse box. Soon I was disappointed to find that as long as the computer was connected to that uVerse port, I would often get digital interference (giant pixelation) on the TV shows I was watching or recording in the uVerse set top box. "Uh-oh," I thought, "This probably means the TrendNet router is going to create the same kind of digital interference. The uVerse documentation doesn't mention using the network port as a local internet connection, so maybe it's not really meant to be used that way." I ended up disconnecting all devices from the uVerse network port, because every device did cause interference in the uVerse signal. (It's possible there was something defective in the uVerse box, of course. I didn't pursue that with AT&T, probably should have.)

Well, I received the TrendNet router. I wasn't going to return it because I knew I could use it elsewhere in the house. However, I decided on a whim to try it as a router on the back of that uVerse box. It worked! I was able to hook up all three devices to the network with the TrendNet as the "buffer" router between the uVerse box and the AV devices. I've never seen the digital interference again, and my streaming Netflix movies always connect at the highest HD bandwidth.

So, I don't know what magic is inside this TrendNet router that solves the digital interference problem, but I'm happy that it did. I've been using it for 2 months now with no problem.

Installation required no drivers - I just plugged in everything and it worked perfectly. The sturdy metal enclosure is good because the router tends to get shoved into the back of the cabinet and gets things piled on top of it, so it is handling a lot of physical abuse.

Update October 2012: Has now worked flawlessly for 15 months.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for small-medium networks, September 14, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Bought this to replace an old fast ethernet switch that was at least 10 years old. We have about 20 computers on a work domain who primary deal with excel and quickbooks files. i also bought a few of the trendnet $12 gigabit pci nic cards for our older computers to get the better speed offered by this.

I wasn't expecting the results we received, it out performed my expectations. Quickbooks files (over 200MBs) open instantly and there is no hesitation at all opening or saving excel files. Now the bottleneck for our work network is our hard drives. Normal speeds across the network are about 65 - 70MB/s when transferring a large file. Max would be about 100MB/s if the hard drives could keep up. Your result may vary depending on # of active computers and other factors.

I liked this so much I purchased the 8 port version for my home network, it works just as good and no hiccups at all streaming large files to my ps3 (wired) through the PS3 media server or to a boxee box through a shared network drive.

Best part is probably color coded connection lights on the front of it. I was able to identify which computers were not connection at gigabit speeds without going to each one to check the connection. Green for gigabit, orange for fast ethernet, nothing for no connection. simple and easy. turns out not just some nic's needed replaced but also some wires needed to be upgraded from cat5 to cat5e. Remember you'll need a cat5e cable or better to get the gigabit speeds. Also note a lot of routers provided by internet providers (verizon, comcast, ect..) are only fast ethernet. Make sure all your computers are plugged into this switch and then connect one port to you router. that connection will only be up to 100Mb/s (orange) but unless your internet connection is better than that it will not matter.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Works perfectly, easy installation, speedy as expected., December 12, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is the rackmount version of the more popular TEG-S24Gd switch, also offered here on Amazon. This rackmount version does include the mounting brackets/tabs for installation into a rack. It also includes a set of 4 rubber feet, which can be added for a desk/table-top installation. The on/off switch on the back is very handy, so the cord (rear-mounted) does not need to be removed in order to power the unit on/off. The indicator lights are easy to read, and provide a very easy indication of operation at gigabit rates (green), vs. non-gigabit. As noted in the description, there is no management interface. Just plug it in, add your networking cables, and it just works. I replaced an aging 10/100 24-port model, and as expected, this switch screams in comparison, for all my internal network transfers (especially for streaming from my server), and provides great throughput to my wireless access point as well. For internet connectivity, I am limited only by my ISP speed limits, which are generally working as advertised. The documentation consists of a very simple and terse quick install guide, but with no management interface, nothing more is required. I have a complex network (for a home), which includes 4 small and cheap 4-port switches, and everything worked without a hitch, using this switch as the center of my topology.
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