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TRUE GIANTS: Is Gigantopithecus Still Alive? Paperback – November 29, 2010

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 188 pages
  • Publisher: Anomalist Books (November 29, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1933665491
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933665498
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.4 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #908,530 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By stuartm VINE VOICE on December 14, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've had a long term interest in crypto-zoology in general and Bigfoot/Yeren/Yeti/et. al. specifically for many decades. Loren Coleman has been writing in this field for even longer as well as maintaining the excellent cryptomundo.com website. So he (along with Mark Hall) is very qualified to write about OTHER "giant" man-apes that have been seen and tracked around the world.

Herein lies the difference that distinguishes this book from other crypto and Bigfoot works: True Giants is NOT about Bigfoot, it is about more elusive giant primates that are even larger (specifically taller) than the alleged Bigfoot. True giants are claimed to be 9 to 18 feet tall! With tracks that are also proportionately larger than Bigfoot tracks.

The thesis of this book is that these giants may have existed up to modern times AND may be a more reasonable presumed descendant of Gigantopithecus than Bigfoot is.

Are the authors correct? I recommend buying and reading this book and deciding for yourselves. There really is no other work that surveys the stories of True Giants with the comprehensiveness of Coleman and Hall. And few works in this field are written with this balance of open-mindedness and reasonable skepticism.

I would give it 5 stars, but I really wanted more images, specifically of the four-toed tracks that seem to be a key marker for True Giants versus Bigfoot. I would also like to know what ancestry the authors would attribute to Bigfoot if Gigantopithecus is to presumed to be a True Giant as I had previously thought of Gigantopithecus as the best candidate for Bigfoot's ancestor.

Overall, I recommend this for crypto followers as the subject matter is unique and the thesis thought-provoking.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Reading Teach on March 8, 2011
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This is an interesting book that looks back at giant legends and combines that with giant sightings of the past few hundred years. What you get is an interesting theory on what gigantopithecus might be and how a even taller primate than bigfoot might exist in the world. Well written and not over the top, just a presentation of the facts as they seem them and their commentary on how the facts could be interpeted. Most amazing part of the book is the consisent descriptions from every corner of the world of the giants as cannibals(eating humans though not themselves). Always intrigues me when legends from unconnected parts of the world are amazingly similar.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tartarus on May 30, 2013
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This is not a book about Bigfoot. Granted, Bigfoot is pretty big and could technically be considered a giant. And it does get a few mentions in the book. However, the main creatures this book is concerned with are far bigger creatures, around 3 to 6 metres tall.

The authors suggest that the giants of legend could be based on real life creatures that roamed the earth. Even more incredibly, giants may still be around today as is indicated by various eyewitness reports of truly massive man-beasts.
One of the most focused on giants in the book are the orang dalam- hairy giants from the jungles of Malaysia that have been sighted by large numbers of eyewitnesses. The book also discusses giant reports from other parts of the world including Europe, the Himalayas, the Americas, Africa and Oceania. True Giants are reported to often dwell in sheltered caves and to avoid humans whenever possible (understandable considering humans' often less than hospitable attitudes towards that which is different).

The authors identify Bigfoot as Paranthropus and the True Giants as Gigantopithecus. I'm uncertain of the Paranthropus as Bigfoot notion (Paranthropus would have to grow bigger and move from Africa to North America, but that could perhaps work). And as for the True Giants, while I agree that Gigantopithecus might explain a fair portion of them, especially when we consider reports of giants with gorilla-like faces, there is one thing to note. The authors point out that at least some True Giants do things like making clothing and building tools and may in ancient times have done things like herding animals and even taken up smithing. The authors seem to interpret this as the giants imitating humans.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Laurie Lagomarsino on December 14, 2010
Format: Paperback
I've always been a firm believer that Gigantopithecus is still around and we know him as Bigfoot now. Loren has always made a very convincing point to that fact. I for one can't wait to read more of his wonderful books if they're anything like this one.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bruce D. Wilner on December 18, 2012
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It is regrettable to watch Loren Coleman--who has, in the past, collaborated on some quite good cryptozoological efforts--degenerate into a let's-sell-whatever-for-a-quick-buck sort of practitioner.

The arguments presented in this work are, in a word, unconvincing. The key scientific thesis that permeates the work is the assumption (by no means proven) that Gigantopithecus was an extinct human being when it seems ultra-clear to responsible modern researchers that his affinity to Pongo pygmaeus was much, much more probable. (Critically, modern primatologists are in a terrific rush to place Pongo on _yonder_ branch of the hominin tree while relegating Pan and Gorilla to _our_ branch.) Even the geography of Gigantopithecus's fossil distribution speaks to this: both animals clearly originated in the humid subtropical biomes of eastern and southeastern Asia.

When you take a gander at, say, Krantz's "Big Footprints" or--for that matter--the unknown hominid material in something as inchoately archaic as Heuvelmans's "Sur La Piste des Betes Ignorees"--you perceive that hard-boiled scientists have conducted careful research, leaving no stone unturned. In contrast, Hall and Coleman have done little more here than present a smattering of myths and he-said-she-saids and ultra-generalized stories of vague recollections of traditions. And their grab-bag of paleocultural features (creature X wears no clothing, does not speak, and does not control fire, but is comfortable dancing around in circles while beating drums--drums _manufactured_ with considerable [= Homo sapiens] artifice) strikes the careful thinker as beyond preposterous.

Now, just about every Neolithic people that survives to this day is found to have a euhemerized culture hero.
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