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  • M*A*S*H TV Season 8
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M*A*S*H TV Season 8


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This 32-disc collection includes every episode from all 8 seasons with hours of behind-the-scenes bonus features, making Monk: The Complete Series a compulsively essential addition to any DVD obsessive’s collection. Learn more


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M*A*S*H TV Season 8 + M*A*S*H TV Season 7 + M*A*S*H TV Season 9
Price for all three: $41.17

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Product Details

  • Actors: Alan Alda, Mike Farrell, David Ogden Stiers, Gary Burghoff, Jamie Farr
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Box set, Color, Dubbed, Full Screen, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: English (Mono), French (Mono), Spanish (Mono)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox
  • DVD Release Date: November 11, 2008
  • Run Time: 638 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (112 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001DMVZM6
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,315 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

As the eighth season opens, Radar receives a letter from home proving war is not the only place where death strikes unexpectedly. The news quickly has Radar shipping stateside, followed by a period of adjustment as everyone tries to get used to a nervous and bumbling Klinger being in charge as company clerk. Things go from bad to worse as both Colonel Potter and Charles have to be quarantined with mumps. Then Hawkeye decides to stop drinking after receiving a bar bill so big that he's shocked into realizing, "I could have bought a used Studebaker for this!"

Aside from incoming wounded, the 4077 is besieged by congressional aides, doctors demonstrating new techniques, inspecting colonels and a return visit from psychiatrist Sidney Freedman. Now if only everyone would just go away so the docs could get some sleep!

Customer Reviews

MASH was the best TV show ever made!
Melinda Lamond
I grew up watching M*A*S*H, from season one I found the entire series to age very well, even in 2005.
T. LeBaron
This season had many good episodes, like every other season, to me.
Randall Banks

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

199 of 208 people found the following review helpful By Randall Banks on February 21, 2005
Format: DVD
Season eight was the final year for Radar. His personal life was just taking too much time. It was also harder and harder to explain why he was not on the show anymore. This season had many good episodes, like every other season, to me. Many spoilers here, but it seems that everyone knows the episodes well enough.

Too Many Cooks. - Hawkeye and B.J walk into the mess tent to talk to Klinger about issues at the camp. Klinger puts food in their faces, and they smell it, then taste it. Surprisingly, for M*A*S*H food it's good. Turns out a clumsy soldier is an excellent cook. Potter, though, is having serious issues. He's very angry and snapping at anyone who happens to get close to him. He puts an end to the good food, accusing Hawkeye of tricking him and lying.

Are You Now, Margaret? - A congressional aid belies his reasons for being there when he accuses her of being a commie. The main cast work to free her from his grip.

Goodbye Radar (Part I)- Two parter that sees Radar returning from R&R to find that there is no generator. No light, no suction means serious problems for everyone. Potter heads into the swamp to tell the swamprats that Radar's Uncle Ed died. This is after Radar couldn't find a generator anywhere. This episode ends in Radar's office with Potter, B.J, and Hawkeye consoling Radar after a phone call home. He gets his orders from Potter to sign hardship discharge papers. Radar is going home.

Goodbye Radar (Part II) - No generator means Radar feels guilty and decides to stay. He feels that if he leaves that the camp would fall apart. Potter says that he's not thinking with his head. Hawkeye is far more blunt telling him to go home. Klinger gets a generator which convinces Radar that it's time to go home.
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59 of 62 people found the following review helpful By T. LeBaron on March 4, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I grew up watching M*A*S*H, from season one I found the entire series to age very well, even in 2005. What I'm finding as the series has cycled around again via the daily repeats on the Hallmark Channel, is that as the series moved along and through various cast changes, the characters matured and the show evolved from being closer to slapstick in its first couple seasons to a much more family atmosphere that felt a lot more real. Not to take anything away from Henry Blake, trapper John or Frank Burns...those characters and shows were sheer comic genius and there's been nothing like them before or since...but I found BJ Hunnicutt and Colonel Potter to be more down-to-earth and more believable characters with real emotions and I felt like we got to know the characters better in the later years (even Winchester showed a side of himself towards the end that no one would have expected when he first came on board). Gary Burghoff left during season eight for the same reasons that Larry Linville did after the fifth year...he simply felt he had done all he could with Radar's character. The cast changes didn't change things for me even the slightest in my enjoyment of the show...facts of life for an ensemble like "M*A*S*H" or "ER" where people come, people go and the characters adapt. Season eight of this series brought some very touching and some very funny moments to what will always be in my mind one of the best half-hours on television for years to come.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Louis Damico on March 3, 2005
Format: DVD
Hey Cpl.K... it's true that this series is set during the Korean War... no one can dispute that, but it is fathomable that much of the anti-war satire in the show was aimed specifically at the Vietnam war - which seems logical considering the times that the show was aired.

I guess either you hate MASH or you love it. It seems that not many people are "in-between" when it comes to war issues. But I have to say, aside from missing Radar... I find MASH to just keep getting better as the show progresses. By season eight, the characters are well set in their roles and their interaction with each other, is not merely slapstick, as it was in the earlier seasons, but more emotional and family like. They even play jokes on each other with good-humor and love. In the earlier days practical jokes were usually played to get even with Frank or Hot-Lips... but now even Margaret gets in on the shenanigans, and we see that they are all just people trying to keep their heads on straight through some very difficult times (to say the least).

I can't wait to have the entire series on DVD... as you can probably tell, I just love a good sense of humor. This series has it and more... because it expresses humor within some pretty bleak circumstances.

Keep your eye out for episode: "Period of Adjustment" Where Klinger, the new "Clumpity Kirk" makes his first attempt to fill Radar's shoes.

:)

Louie
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Britt Gillette on April 20, 2005
Format: DVD
Based on a Richard Hooker novel of the same name, MASH was released in 1970 as a full-length feature film by 20th Century Fox before experiencing widespread success as a groundbreaking television sitcom in the Fall of 1972. The show's brilliant integration of drama and comedy made it one of the most celebrated shows in TV history, culminating in an eleven year prime time series stint. The 1983 series finale of MASH made history as the program with the single largest audience in television history, beating out several SuperBowls and the fabled "Who Shot J.R." episode of Dallas. With the proliferation of new television mediums, it's a record likely to never be broken...

The sitcom is set in South Korea during American involvement in the Korea War (with M*A*S*H standing for "Mobile Army Surgical Hospital"). Buffered from the front lines by a mountain range and a minefield, the men and women of MASH were tasked with patching up wounded American soldiers. Unique to its genre, the cast of MASH was unusually large. Surgeons Dr. Benjamin Pierce (Alan Alda) and Dr. "Trapper" John McIntyre (Wayne Rogers) play the roles of excellent doctors who enjoy women and booze, while Dr. Frank Burns (Larry Linville) and Nurse Practitioner Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan (Loretta Swit) play foil to the two men's shenanigans (due to a contract dispute, Rogers' character was later replaced by Dr. B.J. Hunnicutt - played by Mike Farrell). The character of Frank Burns was also later replaced by Dr. Charles Emerson Winchester (David Ogden Stiers)...

Corporal Max Klinger (Jamie Farr) provides comic relief with his early attempts to procure a discharge by dressing in women's clothing, and Father Francis Mulcahy (William Christopher) adds flavor to a diverse cast of characters.
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