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TYR


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Audio CD, August 30, 1990
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$58.16 $16.99

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Biography

Black Sabbath is credited with creating heavy metal. The success of their first two albums - Black Sabbath and Paranoid - marked a paradigm shift in the world of rock. Not until Black Sabbath upended the music scene did the term “heavy metal” enter the popular vocabulary to describe the denser, more thunderous offshoot of rock over which they presided.

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 30, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: IRS
  • ASIN: B000000QFV
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (100 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #38,651 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Anno Mundi
2. The Law Maker
3. Jerusalem
4. The Sabbath Stones
5. The Battle Of Tyr
6. Odin's Court
7. Valhalla
8. Feels Good To Me
9. Heaven In Black

Editorial Reviews

IRS 1990. Tony Iommi, Tony Martin, Cozy Powell +

Customer Reviews

This song is so good.
Matthew Jordan
A diverse, artistic, progressive, both dreamy and powerful, nicely produced heavy rock concept album.
George M.
Tony Martin is the best singer Black Sabbath has ever had.
S. Rivera

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Lunar Strain on March 31, 2005
Format: Audio CD
I, like many, gave up on Sabbath when Dio left. I even know fans that gave up right after Ozzy left! I loved the Ozzy years and I loved the Dio years even more [I'm a bigger fan of Dio, but that's just a personal taste :-)] After Dio left, I just lost interest in the band and didn't even give their ablums after the departure a try. Well, one day while scrounging through a CD store, my eyes fell upon TYR for a real cheap price. I decided what the hell and purchased it. After I put the disc on, my reaction was WOW! The whole disc was great from start to finish! Sabbath really did go on after Dio! And this Tony Martin fella...WOW does he have a set of pipes! I might be comitting blasphomy when I say this, but he could be better than dio :-O So if your a person like me and forgot about Sabbath after the Ozzy or Dio years, pick TYR. You will be glad you did!
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Félszemű Farkaskutya (Call me Wolfie) on July 14, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Yep, it doesn't have much to do with Ozzy-era Sabbath, so if that's all you're looking for, you can pretty much disregard it.
But if you like a wider palette of metal, this is really a great disc. The opening four songs are all top notch metal and cover a pretty wide territory. Anno Mundi may be the most 'progressive' song Sabbath ever did. The Lawmaker is fast, has a killer chorus riff, and sounds a lot like something off of Holy Diver, actually. And The Sabbath Stones is a classic, with a pure doom riff changing to a fast triple time outro.
There's a silly little synth orchestration in the middle, then you get another killer pair, the quiet, pretty Odin's Court flowing directly into Valhalla, which is upbeat and almost anthemic, with a catchy chorus you'll scream along too.
Surprisingly good production and high re-listenability value; I've got a lot of spins out of the disc and still enjoy it a lot. More than anything it reminds me of Savatage in the Zak Stevens years, so if you like that kind of metal, definitely check this out.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 28, 2001
Format: Audio CD
By 1990, Black Sabbath were virtually gone from the metal landscape. Ask any of the wise-ass metalheads of the era, and thats what they'll tell you. Music, as far as they've always been concerned, was not actually about music, but image and who is playing it. Most hard rock/metal bands have had ever-changing lineups. Which, to these people, is ok as long as the music gets played on the radio, etc. Ask how they feel about lineups and 9 out of 10 times they will claim that the "original" lineup was and is and always will be the best and the rest is just garbage. Tell them that 'Smoke On The Water' wasn't in fact original Deep Purple and watch their faces go numb (if they believe you at all). Get it? It's not the music, it's the general acceptance and knowledge of who's playing it that makes the fools listen. Thats no way to listen to music and I think most real music fans know that already. There's nothing I can say about "Tyr" that hasn't already been said here; it may well be the greatest Black Sabbath album ever made though. Oh yeah, Ozzy's not singing, the replacement Tony Martin is. And who do you think has the far better voice? Well, Martin does, but he's lacking the image. At least he didn't abuse animals or his wife to earn one. He lets the music speak for itself.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By George M. on June 4, 2000
Format: Audio CD
My advice to the Osbourne years fans is to listen to this masterpiece a little more before they pass judgement. Here are some straight facts about Tyr: This is clearly the first concept album Sabbath did. Tony Martin's perormance is OUTSTANDING. The sonic 'alchemy' of this album is unique: The overall effect is different than anything else Sabbath has done. Consequently, it is inevitable that some Sabbath fans will love and some will hate this CD. In my view, Tyr sets new standards for the heavy metal of the 21st century. A progressive release, both uplifting and moody at times, very atmospheric, which somehow recaptures the feeling of the first Sabbath album. The songs can be roughly divided into three groups: The ones that follow a tempo of their own, definately not a heave metal one. These are the atmospheric instrumental 'The Battle of Tyr', the acoustic ballad 'Odin's Court', the electric ballad 'Feels Good to Me', and the polythematic composition 'The Sabbath Stones', a rather sluggish and chaotic song, which concludes with a fast hard rock theme. The other group are the heavy, fast and powerful but still highly original songs 'Heaven in Black', 'The Law Maker' and 'Valhalla'. And the third group is two unusual songs, the folk influenced 'Jerusalem' and the anthemic 'Anno Mundi', probably the best song of the album. The performance: Cozy Powell's drumming is conservative but consistent, Tony delivers the usual combination of fast and unhurried solos; Neil Murray's bass fills in, but does not make a strong presence, perhaps because it has been mixed lower than usual. I believe that it was intended to be that way, and, as a result, it is Goeff Nicholls' exellent use of keyboards and Tony Martin's vocals that shape the overall sound of Tyr. A diverse, artistic, progressive, both dreamy and powerful, nicely produced heavy rock concept album. Who could ask for more?
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22 of 28 people found the following review helpful By King OCD on September 9, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Instead, the vocalist here is Tony Martin, and he's arguably the finest singer Black Sabbath has ever had. Enough of these ignorant automatons stating "this isn't the real Sabbath." This is Sabbath alright...Iommi's still on the axe, and he's in top form here. His solos rip, and the late-Cozy Powell's drumming is exceptional. Neil Murray's bass lines aren't too shabby, either. All in all, a damn fine album featuring a Black Sabbath with an evolved sound. And for the price, you can't go wrong.
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