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Table Manners Hardcover – October 15, 2001


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick; 1st edition (October 15, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 076361453X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763614539
  • Product Dimensions: 11.6 x 10 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #817,733 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

"Dudunya, if I may say so, you look like a pig." Dudunya replies, with what looks like a piece of prosciutto and a wet string bean atop his forehead, "Chester, dear, please excuse me." And so begins one of the most strangely informative dialogues you'll likely ever hear on the topic of table manners, subtitled "The edifying story of two friends whose discovery of good manners promises them a glorious future."

Chester and Dudunya's alter egos, Chris Raschka (Yo? Yes!) and Vladimir Radunsky (Yucka Drucka Droni), are--almost certainly--insane. But it's that really good sort of insane, the kind that sees through to life's deeper secrets, like the "16-Bite Potato-Eating Method" and the proper way to fold a napkin for the queen ("Only the Queen may wear her napkin as a crown!").

As Chester guides Dudunya through the mechanics of the mange ("Drinking without a glass... zebra style... ugly," "Dining without a napkin... wild boar style... filthy ugly"), Raschka and Radunsky's punchy illustrations and collages make sure that any actual learning going on doesn't interfere with the fun. And in a book filled with so many hilarious little details, you'll probably need to read it at least a few times to properly appreciate them all--except, of course, the "Shawarma Uncle" on "Chester's Chart of Full-Mouthed Speaking Accidents," which is pretty much impossible to pass by without laughing out loud. But then again, you'll probably want to study Table Manners carefully anyway, just so you, too, can be ensured of "a glorious future." (Ages 4 to 8) Paul Hughes

From Publishers Weekly

This ever-so-cultivated manual, decorated with elegant script lettering, tablecloth gingham and snow-white doilies, praises courtesy while giving counterexamples of gauche conduct. The authors dispense the calls to etiquette in a stuffy style, ideally read with a clenched jaw ("Good Lord! The Queen is coming for breakfast! How will you fold the napkins?"), and a subtitle pledges to tell "the edifying story of two friends whose discovery of good manners promises them a glorious future." The companions are Chester, a "Virtuoso Eater" with a smooth blue jellybean of a head, and his untidy sidekick Dudunya, first pictured with a greasy green bean stuck to his bald pate. Dudunya asks plaintive questions ("But Chester, why a fork and knife?"), and Chester is glad to set a fine example. Brash, eye-jolting spreads track the conversation in an array of sharp colors and graphic typefaces; mock-helpful diagrams remind young barbarians to chew ("Chester's Chart of Full-Mouthed Speaking Accidents" displays a "glazed sister" and "cousin in cream sauce"), adding advice, with all the weighty importance of a family heirloom, never to speak with your mouth full ("This I learned from my father's father's father. One day you will pass this on to your children's children's children," says Chester). Readers also learn to say "please" and "thank you" in any of six languages. In a multiple-choice quiz about children's restaurant conduct, keeping one's seat always seems the "right" answer, but many desirable options e.g., chasing the waiter are in evidence. Typically, Raschka's (A Poke in the I) lissome brush strokes revel in free-spiritedness, and Radunsky's (Howdi Do) crazy-quilt collages and casual swats of paint lack even a trace of fussiness; together, these two are anything but uptight. Not surprisingly, this witty handbook dispenses the rules along with suggestions for breaking them. Ages 4-8.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.


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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Roz Levine on December 8, 2001
Format: Hardcover
For all parents who sit at mealtime giving directives, shaking their heads, and sighing as they watch their children chow down, there is finally a book about table manners kids will just eat up. Chris Raschka and Vladimir Radunsky have provided the logical reasons in word and art, for all those things you've been telling your kids for years...please chew with your mouth closed, don't play with your food, use your napkin, wash your hands before you come to the table, no dessert until you eat your vegetables... Written in hip, kid-speak language, their hilarious text is complemented by bold, bright and expressive artwork that will have readers laughing out loud and rolling in the aisles. Perfect for kids 4-8, Table Manners is a high spirited, manic romp through the ins and outs of basic eating skills, and youngsters will have such a good time poring over this busy book, they may not even realize there are subtle messages and simple lessons behind all the fun.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James Gee on May 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover
My 4 and 5 years giggle non-stop when I read the quiz and they pick the most absurd option for the kid's manners at the restaurant. My kids understand what is nonsense and what is good manners.....what a FUN way to present this!!! My 5 year old loved the book so much he insisted we give it to his preschool for their library. What is more fun is to extend the silliness to actual learning of good manners at the table. It is certainly more fun to laugh as you correct your kids manners than to be sour and strict.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Y. Leventhal on December 14, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've had this book for sometime (bought based on the first recommendation here ...), but found it hard to characterize this book: the humor seems to gear towards the young adolescent reader, the content--simple, simple instructions on table manners--seems to aim at the 2 or 3 year olds, the art work in the book (and the odd inclusion of photographs of headshots) seems to beg for appreciation from an adult reader (and it is not my cup of tea). I suggest that before you shell out ... look through the sample pages here to make sure that this is for you.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By L. N. Davis on March 20, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book on table manners has charming art and dryly funny text -- for an adult. The manners taught in it are way, way too simple for anyone but a 2 year old (eat with a spoon--not your hands, wipe on the napkin--not your sleeve, Don't put food in your hair), while the pictures and text are far too advanced for a two year old. A Ten year old might be tickled by the elaborate Russian names, but a child young enough for those lessons can barely talk yet. I bought Tiffany's Table Manners instead, and while it describes too many advanced manners for young children, it has a sufficiency of the ones they need, with plenty more to grow into.
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