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Tabloid 2011 NR CC

4.0 out of 5 stars (45) IMDb 7.1/10

Miss Wyoming makes her mark as a tabloid staple. Morris follows the salacious adventures of this beauty queen with an IQ of 168 whose single-minded devotion to the man of her dreams leads her across the globe, into jail, and onto the front page.

Starring:
Joyce McKinney, Peter Tory
Runtime:
1 hour, 27 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Errol Morris
Starring Joyce McKinney, Peter Tory
Supporting actors Troy Williams, Jackson Shaw, Kent Gavin, Dr. Hong
Studio IFC Films
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
The tale of the Mormon missionary abducted at gunpoint in Surrey and press ganged into sexual enslavement by a former Miss Wyoming that had followed him here.The dominant Miss,who was Joyce McKinney,found herself at the centre of a tabloid storm. Kirk Anderson was the victim supposedly brainwashed by his Mormonism to recant the 3 days of love and sex he had in a Devon cottage,to stay within his church.Morris shows us the feeding frenzy of 3 tabloids, The Daily Express,The Mirror and The Sun,depicting the `war of pictures' that ensued.Miss McKinney,she remains unmarried to this day,tells her side of this extraordinary yarn.Morris utilizes tabloid-style or tongue-in-cheek photographic and cinematic inserts and McKinney's in-studio interview to dominate the film's running time. Morris makes the effects of the frenzy plain.:"you learn when you're famous who your friends are",she says,what few friends she had betrayed her.She comes across as an eccentric,incurable romantic,with undying love for Anderson.She is rendered at the end with some dignity,crying over the death of her dog Boogie,and the elation of having it genetically cloned by a Korean geneticist,a victim of our own crazy notions of love,loyalty and idealism.She has since filed a suit against the film's creator,claiming to have been once again,misrepresented. Anderson,wisely, refused to be interviewed.
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Documentarian Errol Morris turns his camera to a peculiar would-be love story in "Tabloid", an enormously entertaining film due in large part to its subject and star: Joyce McKinney. McKinney was a former Miss Wyoming and dominatrix-for-hire with an especially romantic, and obsessive, view of love. When she was 19, she went looking for that "special guy" with whom to spend the rest of her earthly days. She found him in Kirk Anderson, a devout Mormon whose lifestyle she did not embrace. But she says Kirk loved her and proposed marriage. Then he took off to England on a religious mission. Joyce followed and, with the help of friend Keith May, kidnapped Kirk at gunpoint, whisked him to a cottage in Devon, tied him to the bed and had sex with him for several days.

McKinney believed she was liberating Kirk from Mormon brainwashing. She says that Kirk did not leave when he easily could have, and they made plans to marry...until Kirk saw his kidnapping in a newspaper and had to come up with a story to save himself from excommunication. Kirk said he was genuinely kidnapped and raped by McKinney. The British tabloids had a field day. Kirk became the "Manacled Mormon", and Joyce was presented as a hopeless romantic or, alternatively, as a manipulative vixen, depending upon which paper you read. The authors of the competing tabloid visions, Peter Tory of The Daily Express, who publicized Joyce's point of view, and Kent Gavin of The Daily Mirror, who dug into her past, are interviewed for the film.

Joyce McKinney tells her own story. She may not possess the mischievous charm that so many men found irresistible 34 years ago, but she is still nutty in a sort of endearing, occasionally frightful way. She never wanted for ingenuity, and she tells a good tale.
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Format: DVD
Joyce McKinney, the primary subject of Errol Morris' jovial 2010 documentary "Tabloid," is living proof fact is indeed stranger than fiction. Part sex kitten, eccentric nut, obsessive stalker and medieval romantic, she's a woman you most certainly would not trust with your checkbook. And yet she's as sexy as Britt Eckland. McKinney sits down with Morris for a series of fascinating interviews. Her personality in her twilight years, as bright and captivating as it was in youth, is proof her infamous escapades of the 1970s were fueled by an unusually fast-talking charisma.

The focus of an hilariously lurid 1977 scandal (Joyce McKinney and the Case of the Manacled Mormon), McKinney traveled from the U.S. to England to kidnap Kirk Anderson, a Utah-bred Mormon missionary with whom she had fallen in love. Armed with a fake hand gun, she forces Anderson into a car and drives him to a cozy British cottage where she promptly ties him to the bed for a three-day love fest. As she says in modern interviews, this was the man of her romantic dreams imprisoned by a repressive Mormon ideology. She was saving him from the cult clutches of inhibition. Plus, she was hoping to become pregnant and marry the strapping man. By the time he returned to aghast Mormon protectors, he had changed his story to kidnapping and rape so as to avoid excommunication. How much of this is literally true matters little. The bottom line is she tied this virginal man to a bed, burned his clothes in the fireplace and insisted on him experiencing a forced honeymoon of his lusty dreams.

McKinney was promptly arrested and imprisoned in England and the tabloids had a field day of "He Said She Said.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There were two smaller documentaries inside this hash -- either one would probably have been better alone. They both purport to tell the story of a young North Carolina woman, Joyce McKinney, who fell in love with a Mormon missionary, pursued him to the U.K. in 1977, and with the help of friends kidnapped him and put on a full-bore sex offensive in a remote cottage in order to secure his love and free him from Mormon "training." Other documentaries I've seen by Errol Morris had more respect for their topic, I feel. Even VERNON, FLORIDA, whose citizens and ambience go from weird to a kind of transcendental weird, stayed with the mood of that quiet and isolated small town and let town citizens, abetted by the camera, speak for themelves. TABLOID was about half that, about half Michael Moore kneejerk irony (as the central figure reminisces about her teenage years, a clip of a strutting majorette is shown). The problem with this injected camp is that it tends to drag us away from the subject. After the film was over, I found myself wondering about her -- did Joyce McKinney finish college? -- how did she wind up in Wyoming? -- did she ever have a full-time job? -- omissions or partial omissions which seemed a little unfair given the assault on her erotomania and (one could argue) insufficient socialization. I left with the feeling that I'd learned a little about the tabloid treatment of a singular woman who may have been even more wack than the "cult" she affected to despise, but ultimately that no one got it right, least of all the normally insightful Errol Morris. If you're a Morris fan at some point you'll probably wind up seeing TABLOID, but be prepared for some letdown.
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