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Tai Chi Chuan: 24 & 48 Postures with Martial Applications Paperback – July 9, 1996


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Ymaa Publication Center; 2 edition (July 9, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1886969337
  • ISBN-13: 978-1886969339
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 6.9 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #377,596 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This book presents to interested readers many practical martial arts applications along with the health promoting exercises of Taijiquan. I would like to express my congratulations to coach Liang and coach Wu for a meticulous and successful cooperative effort." (Grandmaster Wang Ju-Rong, Professor; China Shanghai Athletic Institute, Chinese Wushu National Level Judge)

About the Author

Liang, Shou-Yu was born on June 28, 1943 in the city of Chongqian, Sichuan Province, China. When he was six he began his training in Qigong, the art of breathing and internal energy control, under the tutelage of his renowned grandfather, the late Liang, Zhi-Xiang. Mr. Liang was taught the esoteric skills of the Emei Mountain sect, including Da Peng Qigong. When he was eight, his grandfather made special arrangements for him to begin training Emei Wushu (martial arts).
Wen-Ching Wu was born in Taiwan, China in 1964. He loved Wushu and many othe sports since a young age. During high school he was on the school's basketball an softball teams. He graduated from high school as a salutatorian. He came to the U.S. in 1983 to study Mechanical Engineering and in 1988, he graduated with honors from Northeastern University, with a BSME degree.

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Customer Reviews

This book presents the 24 and 48 posture tai chi form.
Magellan
While the instructions are good and you can learn from the book, it is better to take a class.
Amazon Customer
This book is an excellent book for the beginner it shows the moves very clearly. good photos.
Krait

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

167 of 173 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
Any Taiji book begs the question "why does this book exist?" You can't learn from a book after all, so a book must either enhance what you get from your current teacher, or help you find a new one.
The typical Taiji book doesn't stand up to this question. It shows a form (usually poorly executed) sandwiched in a big wad of esoterica that is at best useless to a typical student and at worst misleading.
Master Liang's book, on the other hand, is among the best that I've seen that are available to the public.
First, of all, the examples are shown correctly. My pet peeve in Taiji books is bad posture and poor habits that should be purged after a few years of studying under a competent teacher, if not in the process of editing the photos. In contrast, master Liang's execution is, of course, impeccable. Second, this book contains guidelines for correct execution, which in most Taiji books is completely missing.
These two factors alone make it stand above any of the widely distributed titles. I would prefer a little more emphasis on readily observable criteria of correct performance. Armed with this knowledge, a student could readily critique himself, or a potential teacher. I've seen only one or two better books in this regard, and those were privately published.
Third, the book contains many demonstrations of applications for the 24 movement form which will be of interest to serious students and martial artists. Many people are unaware of Taiji martial applications because the abundance of grappling, throwing and other close quarters techniques makes Taiji fors difficult to interpret.
Finally, while even students of traditional forms will find much of value here, this book covers two of the most widely studied standardized forms.
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43 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Arthur L. Fleschner on September 1, 2002
Format: Paperback
I bought two tapes to learn the 24 Posture Yang Short Form. One by Paul Lam and the other by David Dorian Ross. I liked both and especially enjoy anything David Dorian Ross does. However, I kept finding myself wondering when I tried to practise what I learned on the tapes without watching: "what foot should the weight be on." I looked at many books. This one is great. It gives clear instructions and has photo's with lines to show the direction the hands and feet should move. However, you have the same problem with these directional lines as with a video when you are facing the instructor, i.e., they are mirroring you so what looks like a move to the right is actually a move to the left. That is where the text helps so much. I still am using the videos to learn but this was exactly the adjunct help I was looking for to memorize the moves. After doing a section of the tape, I can go to the book and begin to memorize which foot is bearing the weight and which foot is moving in which direction etc. I am so impressed I am going to order the accompanying video from [online store} as soon as I submit this article.
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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 21, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is a superb book for practitioners of Tai Chi Chuan who have been taught the basics and need a reference guide. (In fact, although I would discourage anyone from learning any martial art from a book, this book is one of the few that might be able to do just that!) The pictures are clear, abundant, and pertinent. The descriptions of each move (or part of a move) are concise and detailed. Also, the various applications shown for each move truly demonstrate the ENERGY of the move, not just an obvious attack and/or defence. The level of Master Liang's skill is evident throughout the book.
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Magellan HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on December 24, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book presents the 24 and 48 posture tai chi form. The 24 move form is good for busy people, but the 48 move form is even better because it combines movements from the 3 most popular styles of tai chi, Yang, Wu, and Chen, so the student gets some background in each. At 150 pages long in large paperback format, this book packs a lot of info between the covers. For example, I learned that in addition to the Wu style, there is also a W'u style, which I didn't know, although I've studied both Yang and Wu style tai chi.

The author gives a brief introduction to tai chi in the first chapter, discussing basic concepts and information, then proceeds to some classical Taoist philosophy. He also tells some interesting stories about the founder and his sons, who had many adventures and exploits, and various stories and legends have grown up around them.

Next there is a separate chapter on chi gung, a subject that has become almost a requirement for a tai chi book, I notice. However, most of the book is taken up by athe chapter showing the martial applications and the 48 move form. Dozens of applications are shown, and the photos are clear and easy to understand. I found this the most enjoyable part of the book, as there are still postures I don't know all applications for, such as snake creeps down, and the author presented one on that.

There is a chapter on guidelines for tai chi practice that gives detailed instructions for how to use the different parts of the body, from the eyes to the feet in performing the form. I found this useful because sometimes I still forget some of the fine details of how to hold the body when I do the form.
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