It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back

May 2, 1995 | Format: MP3

$3.99
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30
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1:40
30
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3:46
30
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5:19
30
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4:17
30
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4:31
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1:21
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3:37
30
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4:53
30
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1:56
30
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3:49
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3:14
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6:23
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1:20
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5:02
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3:18
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16
3:25


Product Details

  • Label: Def Jam/RAL
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 57:51
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002PMC8ME
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (204 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,410 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

This album is a musical marvel, in every sense of the word.
P. B. Reynolds
Another all time great album, they sure don't make rap music like this anymore and that's a fact.
orlando
Best rap album ever (that I've heard), probably one of my ten favorite CDs.
Denise Hamilton

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

89 of 94 people found the following review helpful By P. B. Reynolds on February 17, 2005
Format: Audio CD
All that I could say after hearing this album for the first time was "wow!" Even though the tracks here are almost two decades old, they sound much more daring, progressive, and experimental than any rap you can hear on the radio today. Is it possible that we are "de-evolving" now that perfection was already reached in 1988? I mean, I enjoy a lot of Snoop and NWA as well, but everything recorded since, say 1995 has been pretty abysmal in comparison to rap's "Golden Age." I suspect that since Chuck D. and the gang so thoroughly nailed it here, others knew that they couldn't rise to the occasion, so they didn't even try.

This album is a musical marvel, in every sense of the word. This is coming from a southern white male who was only four years old when this came out and, a mere few months ago, hated pretty much all rap. What can I say? I've been converted. Chuck D.'s militant message here is simply dead on, and while I can't quite get behind their endorsement of Farakhan, I can overlook that, because I agree completely with everything else they're laying down here. From the first track to the last, the album is a relentless indictment of government and media, from the unheard voices of urban America. And if that wasn't enough, the music is incredibly funky.

I'll take these Bomb Squad arrangements and Terminator X turntable magic over all of the over-produced pop garbage we have to put up with now any day of the week. Others have already extolled the merits of the brilliant production values and technical superiority, so all I'll say is this. The grooves here are as deep and pervasive as anything you will ever hear in popular music.
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Eric C. Martin on August 2, 2002
Format: Audio CD
"Some people said rap is all noise. So, I gave them noise!"
-Hank Shocklee (Bomb Squad)
A furious mixture of whistles, whines, and noise over dense samples, scratches, and beats which Shocklee later called "Music's worst nightmare." Aside from Chuck D.'s intelligent and thought provoking lyrics and Flavor Flav's hyper-active, idiotic, role playing of the court jester, it was Hank and Keith Shocklee, and Eric (Vietnam) Sadler of the bomb Squad who put PE on the map. As a whole, the group was way ahead of it's time. Boldly putting out their political views and attacking the media, PE was also unfairly attacked in the press portrayed as anti-semetic and anti-white.
From the groundbreaking "Bring The Noise", to Slayer's guitar sample on "She Watch Channel Zero", to the pulsating piano chord on "Black Steel in the Hour of Chaos", PE simply shines.
Sad that this group never got the financial recognition it rightly deserved. Back in the day, I was the only one in the group of friends who worshiped PE. Everyone else couldn't handle the intelligent lyrics that [weren't] sprayed with 4 letter words.
Feed your brain. Listen to the genius that was PE and READ the lyrics.
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48 of 53 people found the following review helpful By R. Riis VINE VOICE on July 14, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Perhaps the greatest rap/hip-hop album ever made, and one of the great albums of any genre. PE rock harder than any of today's gangstas with solid beats and magnificent sound collages that front eloquent raps not about violence, sexism, and nihilism, but empowerment, self-respect, and self-determination. Just as fresh today as it was in 1988. Five times five stars.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Shotgun Method on August 3, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Public Enemy were perhaps the best, most influential hip-hop act of all time, and this is the greatest thing they created. Fear Of A Black Planet is the only other P.E. release in the same league and even that had some moments of filler. By the time Apocalypse '91 was released the group was already fractured from the Professor Griff controversy and past its prime. With It Takes A Nation... Chuck D., Flavor Flav, and the Bomb Squad were young, energized, angry, and at the top of their game in 1988.

It Takes A Nation... was hip-hop's clarion call to the world. While earlier albums from Run D.M.C., the Beastie Boys, and others proved that hip-hop could expand its sound and be more than a passing fad, Public Enemy showed that hip-hop could also be a voice for the black community and its social and political concerns. Intense, angry, militant, political, thoughtful, creative...all of the above apply to this album. While I'm no proponent of black radicalism (and think Louis Farrakhan is a nutcase), I definitely admire the intelligence and innovation that went into this recording. And contrary to what some have said, there is little that is racist about the messages in this album, though the views presented are largely Afrocentric. After all, this is the same group that later teamed up with Anthrax (a bunch of thrash metal-playing white dudes) to record "Bring Tha Noize" and bring about rap-metal. P.E. are trying to make people question society and history and look at the world around them, similar to what earlier punk bands like The Clash, Crass, and The Dead Kennedys have done. Pretty powerful stuff.

Love him or hate him, you ignore Chuck D. at your own peril. His prescence as an M.C. and lyricist is virtually unrivalled.
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