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Taking the Quantum Leap: The New Physics for Nonscientists Paperback – January 25, 1989

ISBN-13: 978-0060963101 ISBN-10: 0060963107 Edition: Revised

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Revised edition (January 25, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060963107
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060963101
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.8 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #109,858 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Fred Alan Wolf is a world-renowned physicist, writer, and lecturer who also conducts research on the relationship of quantum physics to consciousness. He is the author of 13 books, 3 audio CD courses and received the National Book Award for "Taking the Quantum Leap". He is a member of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Collegium of Scholars and was Professor of physics at San Diego State University for twelve years. Dr. Wolf has appeared in many nationally released films including "What the Bleep Do We Know?" and "The Secret." His latest book is "Time-Loops and Space-Twists: How God Created the Universe."
He has been interviewed on several radio and television programs including New Dimensions Radio, Western Public Radio, National Public Radio, and many others. He was the visiting scholar/scientist-in-residence in the Pacific Northwest sponsored by The Institute for Science, Technology, and Public Policy during the spring season, 1994. He has spoken numerous times before The Commonwealth Club of San Francisco, The Smithsonian Museum in Washington, DC, and several other prominent organizations and been interviewed on a number of television shows between the years 1995 to the present including: The Discovery Channel's The Know Zone, Sightings, The Thinking Allowed Television Series, The Malone show, The Evidence for Heaven. Star Trek IV, Special Collector's edition, The Fabric of Time, The Case for Christ's Resurrection, Down the Rabbit Hole, and the PBS series Closer to Truth.

Customer Reviews

The author makes Quantum Physics an interesting and understandable read.
E. Kiernan
As active observers, we are responsible for selecting which of the infinite possible realities we will experience.
Cynthia Sue Larson
I'm no dummy, and I had to read this book twice even to understand what the hell he was talking about.
JEFFREY C ZOERNER

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

71 of 76 people found the following review helpful By Cynthia Sue Larson TOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is one of the best books for finding out about quantum physics and what impact it has on our lives, from the vantage point of the parallel universes (or many worlds model) perspective. Wolf's writing is humorous and descriptive, and the book is chock full of wonderful cartoons, photographs, charts, and quotations. Whether you've studied physics before or are a complete novice, you'll find lots of good information here! As active observers, we are responsible for selecting which of the infinite possible realities we will experience. As Wolf puts it, "To be or not to be is not the question; it is the answer".
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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By T. Parry on March 22, 2001
Format: Paperback
"Taking the Quantum Leap" is an excellent introduction to the bizzare and amazing world of quantum physics. Wolfe takes the reader on a journey from the early Greeks to the modern day as man searched for the answers to the universe's riddles. He shows systematically how physicists first thought they had solved everything with Newtonian mechanics and were then thrown on their heads with the discovery of the quanta. Wolfe proceeds to describe how the science world struggled with these new ideas and attempted to bring meaning to a universe that had suddenly become unpredictable.
Wolfe's analysis delves into the inner workings of the human mind and shows how each of us affects the "reality" we experience. Suddenly the human mind becomes the shaper of the universe and each of us is "god". This is both reassuring and disturbing at once, but Wolfe guides the reader through it, showing that we and we alone control our destiny.
The book only gets four stars because at some points, Wolfe moves beyond the realm of science and introduces a strong religious trend into the story. While he weaves it in well, it still seems out of place, and would have been stronger had he not taken this route. However, the book is still very strong and informative. Definitely a good starting place for a novice of quantum theory.
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43 of 46 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
Excellent book on Quantum Physics, which is a complex field to understand, especially because of the mechanistic frame of reference we all exist in and are limited by. Entertaining and playful in the way ideas and concepts are presented. Excellent presentation of the history of ideas in Physics. I disagree with one of the previous reviewers, who rated the book low, based on his (her?) claim that Wolf simply uses the text as a means of propagating his own ideosyncratic personal ideas. I urge the reviewer to read other literature on Quantum Physics, and not to give up on trying to understand this complex field. It's not Wolf's descriptions that are fantastic, but the field of Quantum physics that we find hard to grasp, coming, as most of us do, from a rigidly narrow framework of perception of time and space, which we take for granted.
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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful By D. Roberts VINE VOICE on February 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
The physicist Fred Alan Wolf writes a lucid book of the weird & wonderful world of quantum mechanics for we non-scientist types. The field is fascinating.....and bizarre.
Wolf traces the origins of QM from the late 19th century & also discusses how it disproves some of classical physics' most treasured suppositions. This is a great work for those intrigued by science & the "big" developments in physics of the 20th century.
So, for those who possess inquisitive minds, this is a splendid work. The biologist JBS Haldane once said "Reality is not only stranger than we imagine, it is stranger than we can imagine." After reading this book, I think that one would be inclined to agree.
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32 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy on February 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
Just when you find out the 'weirdness' of quantum mechanics (QM), things start to get entangled and in the realm of human consciousness, philosophy and what not. I had started reading QM with Nick Herbert's book 'Quantum Reality' and in the middle of the book I realized that I need a little subtler treatment of the subject matter and hence ending up reading this book, 'Taking the Quantum Leap'. I have to the say that Fread has done an outstanding job at explaining the wave-particle duality with reference to all the famous experiments and their interpretations. He then moves on to the famous Bohr vs. Einstien debate EPR. Much of the book is devoted to exploring the point of views of these two schools of thought.. complementarists vs. the continuists. There are chapters on the theory of Parallel Universes etc.
My dismay begings, and thats why I gave the book 3 stars rather than a 4! is when towards the end of the book, the whole QM is tunred into a hodge podge of philosophies of human consciousness, fate and free will. To my surprise it seems that the author has made up his mind that whatever the state of QM is today, IS indeed the complete description of the physical world. At least I got that impression. In my opinion, this is only 2001 and who knows what discoveries are waiting to be happen in next several hundred years regarding our current understanding of the physical world.
As Einstien once said something to this effect to one of his friends, 'do you really think the moon is there because someone is there to see it!' and yet QM has proven to be successful in proving thores of physical phenomena.
Yet indeed I'm still bothered by QM as I was before reading this book but know a lot more about the various schools of thoughts. Could the Schrodinger's cat be alive and dead at the same time in parallel universes?!?
All in all, an excellent reading for starters in QM.
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