A Tale of Two Cities (Illustrated) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading A Tale of Two Cities (Illustrated) on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

A Tale of Two Cities (Penguin Classics) [Paperback]

by Charles Dickens, Richard Maxwell
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (660 customer reviews)

List Price: $8.00
Price: $7.60 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $0.40 (5%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Monday, April 28? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student

Sell Us Your Books
Get up to 80% back when you sell us your books, even if you didn't buy them at Amazon. Learn more

Book Description

May 27, 2003 0141439602 978-0141439600 Reissue
After eighteen years as a political prisoner in the Bastille the aging Dr Manette is finally released and reunited with his daughter in England. There two very different men, Charles Darnay, an exiled French aristocrat, and Sydney Carton, a disreputable but brilliant English lawyer, become enmeshed through their love for Lucie Manette. From the tranquil lanes of London, they are all drawn against their will to the vengeful, bloodstained streets of Paris at the height of the Reign of Terror and soon fall under the lethal shadow of La Guillotine.

Frequently Bought Together

A Tale of Two Cities (Penguin Classics) + Bleak House (Penguin Classics) + Great Expectations (Penguin Classics)
Price for all three: $24.99

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 9 Up—Charles Dickens's classic tale of one family's suffering during the French Revolution is brought to life in this audio adaptation. The voice of Audie Award-winning narrator Simon Vance sets the tone for the characters and creates the Dickensesqe mood of the times when the rich and the poor were far apart and no one was exempt from the ensuing wrath during the Revolution. Vance's stone varies from soothing to animated while creating different voices for the characters and using appropriate accents. A bonus feature on the last CD is an e-book in pdf format that can be printed or used as a read-along while listening to the audio. This easily navigated feature would be particularly helpful for struggling readers.—Jeana Actkinson, Bridgeport High School, TX
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Review

'I shall treasure the richly detailed explanatory notes. It's an edition which will surely sell to the general reader; yet many truer Dickens specialists than I will be excited by the scope and subtlety of the introduction.' Dr P. Merchant, Christ Church College, Canterbury

'The large clear print, very full notes, and inclusion of Dickens's number plans make it the best paperback available for student use.' Professor Norman Page, University of Nottingham

`I read it every other year. It is the best story of the best hero. It does not pale.' You (Mail on Sunday Magazine) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Product Details

  • Series: Penguin Classics
  • Paperback: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Reissue edition (May 27, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141439602
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141439600
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (660 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #147,828 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
569 of 609 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Eighth Grader reviews A Tale of Two Cities June 29, 2000
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This book is incredible. I read it last year (in eighth grade), and I love it. I love Charles Dickens' language and style. Whoever is reading this may have little or no respect for my opinions, thinking that I am to young to comprehend the greatness of the plot and language, and I admit that I probably do not completely appreciate this classic piece of literature. I do read above a 12th grade level, although that doesn't count for a whole lot. It took me a while to get into this book. In fact, I dreaded reading it for a long time. But nearer to the end, I was drawn in by the poignant figure of a jackal, Sydney Carton. In his story I became enthralled with this book, especially his pitiful life. After I read and cried at Carton's transformation from an ignoble jackal to the noblest of persons, I was able to look back over the parts of the book that I had not appreciated, and realize how truly awesome they are. I learned to appreciate all of the characters, from Lucy Manette to Madame Defarge. I also was affected by all of the symbolism involved with both the French Revolution, and the nature of sinful man, no matter what the time or place. My pitiful review could never do justice to this great book, please don't be discouraged by my inability.
Was this review helpful to you?
186 of 199 people found the following review helpful
By Michele
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Please note that this is not the original Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens - it is RETOLD by Lucinda Dickens Hawksley. English teachers will not accept this version for use in their classes. The Amazon photo and description is misleading. Now I get to buy the original version - hopefully it gets here before the class starts to read it. Anyone want to purchase a new RETOLD version of A Tale of Two Cities?
Was this review helpful to you?
214 of 230 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Tale of Two Cities July 27, 2001
By mp
Format:Paperback
The more Dickens I read, the more impressed I become at his skill as a writer. No matter the form, be it short, long, or a monolith like some of his best works, Dickens excels at changing his style of characterization and plot to fit whatever mode he writes in. "A Tale of Two Cities" is one of his shorter novels, and he manages to make the most of out of the allotted space. The compression of the narrative sacrifices Dickens's accustomed character development for plot and overall effect, but what we get is still phenomenal.
"A Tale of Two Cities" begins in 1775, with Mr. Lorry, a respectable London banker, meeting Lucie Manette in Paris, where they recover Lucie's father, a doctor, and mentally enfeebled by an unjust and prolonged imprisonment in the Bastille. This assemblage, on their journey back to England, meets Charles Darnay, an immigrant to England from France who makes frequent trips between London and Paris. Upon their return to England, Darnay finds himself on trial for spying for France and in league with American revolutionaries. His attorney, Stryver, and Stryver's obviously intelligent, if morally corrupt and debauched, assistant, Sydney Carton, manage to get Darnay exonerated of the charges against him. Darnay, a self-exiled former French aristocrat, finds himself compelled to return to France in the wake of the French Revolution, drawing all those around him into a dangerous scene.
Dickens portrays the French Revolution simplistically, but powerfully, as a case of downtrodden peasants exacting a harsh revenge against an uncaring aristocratic, even feudal, system. The Defarge's, a wine merchant and his wife, represent the interests of the lower classes, clouded by hatred after generations of misuse.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
127 of 136 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Turbulent times in London and Paris April 27, 2005
Format:Paperback
The period from 1775 - the outbreak of the American Revolution - to 1789 - the storming of the Bastille - is the turbulent setting of this uncharacteristic Dickens novel. It is his only novel that lacks comic relief, is one of only two that are not set in nineteenth-century England and is also unusual in lacking a primary central character. London and Paris are the real protagonists in this tale, much as the cathedral was the 'hero' of Hugo's Notre Dame de Paris. Dickens was writing at a time of great turmoil in his personal life, having just separated from his wife, and no doubt the revolutionary theme was in tune with his mental state.

The result is a complex, involving plot with some of the best narrative writing to be found anywhere, and the recreation of revolutionary Paris is very convincing. The device of having two characters that look identical may seem hackneyed to modern readers, but it is here employed with greater plausibility than in Twain's Pudd'nhead Wilson or Collins's The Woman in White.

Dickens was inspired to write this story by reading Carlyle's newly published history of the French Revolution. Those events and their aftermath stood in relation to their time much as World Wars I and II do to ours, that is, fading from living memory into history, yet their legacy still very much with us. In many nineteenth-century novels, especially Russian and British works, you get a sense of unease among the aristocracy that the revolution will spread to their own back yard. In the case of Russia, of course, it eventually did.

I have often recommended A Tale of Two Cities as a good introduction to Dickens for younger readers.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars It's a classic for a reason
Admittedly, Dickens is a extreme favorite of mine. So if you've read other books of his that you didn't like, then you're probably not enough like me to get much from these... Read more
Published 10 days ago by M. Doenges
4.0 out of 5 stars dark & sad
The language of that time is sometimes difficult to understand. The story was dark & sad, as most, if not all of his novels tend to be, but it did have a redeeming ending.
Published 13 days ago by Linda C Paine
4.0 out of 5 stars It was a wonderful book about a horrible time
Mans inhumanity to man and yet there was the ultimate sacrifice of one man for a woman and her family. Read more
Published 18 days ago by Robert McElhaney
5.0 out of 5 stars not many books this good.
Arguably Dickens best. I read it about once a decade for enjoyment and inspiration. Dickens makes every character and every scene count.
Published 21 days ago by R. J. DeGray
4.0 out of 5 stars Left me hankering fro more
This was my first taste of Charles Dickens and I loved it. I won't go into a blow by blow account of the story as I find that unnecessary but I love the history he provides... Read more
Published 26 days ago by Monee
5.0 out of 5 stars "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times..."
I think if I read this years ago I would not have fully apprehended the significance of Dickens. Damn. I get it now.
Published 1 month ago by kymberlee
4.0 out of 5 stars Extremely well-crafted story
Dickens does it again with this classic tale of suspense, intrigue, and sacrifice. His characters, although hard to keep straight, are vivid and realistic. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Jeffrey R Trout
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book
Should always be a book for study in school. Wonderful Christian ethics and examples of unselfish character. A good gift.
Published 1 month ago by Ldeverett
5.0 out of 5 stars A Brief Review
If you're considering this read, buy it and enjoy!

I initially felt very annoyed that this was assigned as reading. Read more
Published 1 month ago by B. Goss
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterful and powerful work
Though some of the language is dated, and particular hyperbole perhaps outmoded, this is a masterful work of major significance. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Nancy Reyering
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xa439672c)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category