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A Talent to Deceive: Who Really Killed the Lindbergh Baby? Paperback – November 4, 2008


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A Talent to Deceive: Who Really Killed the Lindbergh Baby? + The Case That Never Dies: The Lindbergh Kidnapping
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 327 pages
  • Publisher: Synergebooks; 2nd edition (November 4, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0744315948
  • ISBN-13: 978-0744315943
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,206,721 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This is fascinating. I recall my parents discussing the newspaper articles and the publicity surrounding his execution. --Robert Siver

About the Author

William (Bill) Norris is a British author who has been there; done that. In the course of a 50-year professional writing career, which began when he joined his local newspaper as a cub reporter, he has managed to squeeze in a huge variety of experience. From Parliamentary Correspondent of The Times of London at the age of 26 (the youngest since Charles Dickens), to covering the war fronts of Africa, to interviewing leading world statesmen as Political Correspondent of ITN, his journalistic range has been considerable. But between assignments he has managed to be a professional rally driver, sail the Atlantic in a small boat, build his own experimental aircraft and fly it across the United States at the age of 60, and establish the first broadcast TV station in Swaziland. Now living in the South of France after 13 years in the U.S., during which he combined freelance journalism with membership of Florida's prestigious Academy of Senior Professionals at Eckerd College, Bill Norris is currently working on....something.

Customer Reviews

2.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Donald D. Coney, Jr. on October 14, 2010
Overall, I enjoyed the book. William Norris has fashioned a very well written (if at times somewhat over editorialized) book. The Lindbergh case is presented, by in large, in a streamlined and concise manner. Like most other writers on the case, Norris makes almost no pretense to straight reporting and spells out his theories on the case. All that being said, the central problem I have with the book is that while Norris presents new insights into the Lindbergh case he doesn't provide any references, an index or bibliography to support his case. He also spends a lot of time chasing down a supposed "illegitimate" second Morrow son who Norris later determines never in fact existed.

Norris' take on the case is that Dwight Morrow's son, Dwight Morrow Jr. is responsible for the kidnapping/death of the Lindbergh baby and that the extortion was a separate criminal enterprise (an enterprise knowingly facilitated by Charles Lindbergh's releasing of the ransom note to known gangsters). His further contention is that Hauptman did not receive a fair trial (a contention on which I think all but the most diehard Lindbergh defenders/anti-Hauptman adherents can agree) and furthermore was purposely railroaded by NJ officials, Charles Lindbergh and the Morrow family to make the story go away. Essentially, Norris reiterates Ludovic Kennedy's and Anthony Scaduto's assertions that all the evidence against Hauptman was faked and he was the victim of a systematic conspiracy headed up by David Wilentz and other NJ officials. Norris also demonstrates a particular and perhaps justifiable animus toward Lindbergh with repeated references to Lindbergh's duplicitous nature (as evidenced by his numerous illegitimate children and multiple affairs/households and support for the Nazis prior to WW2).
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By US Citizen on August 19, 2012
This book makes some interesting conclusions, but is lacking in evidence to support them. There is discussion of stolen letters regarding the kidnapping, but, in fact, no one knows what were in those letters.

The author makes some key mistakes in his discussion. He talks much about Dwight Morrow Jr. being at Amherst, but Indicates that Amherst is in New Hampshire. Sloppy.

He states that Lindbergh flew several missions in the Pacific. Lindbergh flew at least 50.

He indicates Lindbergh was pro-Nazi. Certainly, he was impressed with the Luftwaffe. But Lindbergh visited Germany at the behest of the U.S government and reported back to them about his findings. Later, Lindbergh had to deny that he was a spy. Also, Lindbergh was deeply disturbed by Krystallnacht. It is difficult to know what is in someone's heart, but I think Lindbergh's propensity to "never complain, never explain" hurt him here.

Overall, the book is an interesting read, but there is VERY LITTLE development of his main premise. If you are looking for the solution of the Lindbergh case, you won't find it here.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Paul G. Gentrup on January 22, 2013
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An interesting read and gives another perspective on the case. There are all kinds of theories out there and this is another one for my collection of books.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Eisman on February 3, 2014
I must note, in the interest of full disclosure, that I have not read this book, and came across it while searching for information on the Morrow family, I was astonished at allegation the author apparently makes that Dwight Morrow Jr., brother of Charles Lindbergh's wife, was behind the kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby.

The fact is, Dwight Jr. was a history professor at Temple University in the early 1960s when I attended school there. By then he was, of course, rather elderly, and rather past his prime. He was not a particularly effective teacher, and sometimes was unfortunately even ridiculed by some of my classmates. On occasion, after some of us had figured out who he was, he did talk a bit about his family. There is absolutely no way this guy was ever involved in a kidnapping and murder of a child.

He was meek, thoroughly academic and about as threatening as a fly on a summer day. Any assertion to the contrary, I submit, is quite absurd.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Richard T Cahill Jr. on January 5, 2013
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First, from a technical standpoint, there are numerous typographical and grammatical errors. The editing is very poor

On the merits, the book is awful. There are factual errors, blatant and likely intentional distortions of evidence, and vicious personal attacks against numerous people. The one thing missing from the book is evidence. The theory of the author lacks any evidence at all. Frankly, the author's theory is foolish and nonsensical.

Of all the books and articles I have read on the Lindbergh case, this one might just be the worst.
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