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Tales From Yesterday - A View From The South Side Of The Sky

May 29, 2007 | Format: MP3

$8.99
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Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
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7:07
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8:08
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2:52
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6:09
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6:29
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6:19
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3:48
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8:02
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5:25
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6:17
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7:00
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3:10
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5:35
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 17, 2007
  • Release Date: May 29, 2007
  • Label: Magna Carta Records
  • Copyright: 1995 Magna Carta
  • Total Length: 1:16:21
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000U7VST0
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #242,003 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Allegra on November 3, 2005
Format: Audio CD
When I first found this album, I thought it was interesting but just okay. Now that I've had this in my cd player for the last few days straight, I realize it is a much better album than I was giving it credit for. And it has given me a greater appreciation for the strength of the music that Yes has penned over the years, in that other artists can take these familiar old gems and reimagine them with a new freshness and power (something Yes themselves did on the Keys to Ascension album). No wonder so many current bands count Yes among their musical influences.

A few of the songs are exact copies of the originals - Enchant's "Changes", for example, or Steve Morse's covers of Howe's solo pieces. This is not a bad thing! Why mess with perfection? Also, Billy Sherwood's delicate but confident performance on World Trade's "Wonderous Stories" reflects his long association with Yes, both on and off stage.

But the album really shines when the artists take the original song and infuse it with their own style. As other reviewers have noted, Annie Haslam's and Steve Howe's "Turn of the Century" is just sublime. Robert Berry's "Roundabout" riffs remind me of the some of the best songs on Yes' Open Your Eyes album. Magellan's "Don't Kill the Whale" takes a song that sounds rather dated on the Tormato album (admit it, it does) and infuses it with new enegy. But the biggest suprise for me was Patrick Moraz' solo piano "Soon". It is one of the times I wish the song were much longer so I could hear what else he might have done with it. "Soon" was never one of my favorite Yes songs, but this version is one of my favorites off of this album.

Perhaps, as one reviewer noted, this was a blatent attempt by Magna Carta to push their stable of artists. But I think the artists featured rose to the challenge and created a tribute worthy of the music of Yes.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By ralph williams on December 5, 1998
Format: Audio CD
How many reviews have you read which say "such and such a song is worth the price of admission alone". But this time it's true and there are two of them: "Roundabout" by Robert Berry and "Startship Trooper" by Jeronimo Road. These are what cover versions should be all about - not just recreating the original note for note but breathing new life and energy into a song which, as in the case of these two, have probably been played to death by most Yes fans. Sometimes this doesn't work, e.g. Magellan's "Don't Kill The Whale" but it is very refreshing that bands are still progressive enough to give it ago. Most of the other tracks are good as well but special mention should be made to the version of "Turn Of The Century" by Steve Howe and Annie Haslam - it's wonderful and worth the price of admission by itself.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Randy Norman on October 19, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I bought this hoping to hear re-workings of the originals, but instead found attempts to mostly re-create the songs note-for-note. The only real exception is Robert Berry's version of "Roundabout". He actually took some time and re-composed this song, and the result is a completely different yet interesting version.
I find the rest of this CD to be embarrassingly painful to listen to, and recommend that you surf swiftly past it. My only comfort is listening to the originals after putting this CD on. Similar to the good feeling you get after ceasing to hit yourself in the head with a hammer.
You're right-I didn't like this one.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mike Reed VINE VOICE on November 26, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Was never even aware of this 13 track Yes tribute CD release until I stumbled across a super-low priced copy. As for tribute albums go, it's decent. I still say, there are simply too MANY tribute CD's out there. Tunes I dug the most here are Robert Berry's re-working of "Roundabout", World Trade's "Wonderous Stories" (very well done), Enchant's "Changes" and Jeronimo Road's contribution of "Starship Trooper". One thing I'll say about each and every artist on this CD, they KNEW plenty (enough, anyway) about Yes to turn in a good tribute title. Not bad at all.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By David M Pickering on December 16, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I was somewhat disappointed by some of the remakes here. To me, one of the purposes of a tribute album is for the artist to try and catch the spirit of a song but still put his/her own stylistic stamp on it. Unfortunately many of the cuts on this recording are merely good clones of the original. I expected more from Steve Morse than note-for-note remakes of "Mood for a Day" and "The Clap"(Morse is one of the best guitar players around so his ability to play these two pieces is not very surprising)--A Dixie Dregs style remake of "Yours is No Disgrace" or "I've Seen All Good People" would have been very welcome.
What makes this recording worth getting is the intimate setting of "Turn of the Century" by Steve Howe and Annie Haslam. I was a big fan of both Yes and Renaissance and it's a delight to hear Ms. Haslam's beautiful soprano gracing this song--one of the most elegant songs in the Yes catalog. The stripped-down setting also allowed me to further appreciate Steve Howe's brilliant guitar work.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Mann TOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 22, 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The material on this album varies between almost straight covers to radical rethinks. How this will strike you is of course a matter of personal preference, but I think that no-one will be five stars happy - some want faithful renditions and the radical material will grate with them, while other want experimental approaches and will find the pure covers problematical.

I fall between those two extremes, a bit more toward the experimental (I can hear the originals or live variations on them from my extensive Yes collection and feel that pure covers are a waste of time in that light) but experimental covers run the risk of venturing from the sublime (eg Joe Cocker's takes on "First We Take Manhattan" and "Love Made A Promise") to the extreme (Bono's version of "Halleluiah") . A long-loved favorite can be quite badly mauled in the quest for Art.

Others have listed the material in depth, I'll cover it with ridiculous brevity.

Roundabout (Robert Berry) is what I'd call a radical rethink.
Siberian Khatru (Stanley Snail) is faithful until the middle when the artist gets busy reinventing.
"Mood for a Day" (Steve Morse) is a faithful rendition.
"Don't Kill The Whale" (Magellan) experimental, (didn't care for this one myself - too disco).
"Turn of the Century" (Howe and Haslam) absolutely faithful but sounds wonderful with the new vocalist and minimalist accompaniment. Probably the Album Cost Worth Barometer for most people.
"Release, Release" (Shadow Gallery) is experimental, but not radically so.
"Wondrous Stories" (World Trade) faithful. A tribute track.
"South Side of the Sky" (Cairo) is another faithful tribute.
Read more ›
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