Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tales of the Iron Road: My Life As King of the Hobos Paperback – October, 1992


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$128.44 $10.96

The Calendar of Loss by Dagmawi Woubshet
The Calendar of Loss by Dagmawi Woubshet
This innovative and moving study illuminates how AIDS mourners—particularly in 1980s Ethiopia—grappled with the death of lovers and friends. Learn more | See similar books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: Marlowe & Co (October 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1569249164
  • ISBN-13: 978-1569249161
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,291,005 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starting in 1931 at age 14, Graham rode the rails until 1980. From a broken home, shunted from father to mother to aunt to married siblings, he found the family he had missed as a child in hobo camps across the country. Writing with the author of Gales of November , he stresses that he is a hobo, and not a bum or a wino, a distinction, he notes, that the general public does not always make. Five times elected King of the Hobos at the annual Hobo convention in Britt, Iowa, he laments the incipient end of hoboing, which has a history dating back to the post-Civil War era and saw its most populous days during the Depression. Now, according to Graham, with the number of rail lines cut, there may be no more than 300 true hobos. This is an intriguing look at a vanishing way of life. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

More like the gypsy than the homeless drifter, the hobo is truly a character of unique attraction, though representing a socially unacceptable way of life. Closely aligned with America's system of railroads, hobos and hoboing have been around since the Civil War, although they were much popularized during the Great Depression. "Steam Train" Graham began hoboing in 1931 and by 1980 had traveled countless miles across the nation. In more recent years, he has become a celebrity of sorts. In this remarkable book he relates a saga of his life and travels, not a sociological treatise. Graham has a wife and two daughters, and they share a strong sense of family. His story does much to establish a definitive history of the American hobo. Highly recommended for most collections.
- Boyd Childress, Auburn Univ. Lib., Ala.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
50%
4 star
50%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Howard L. Dixon on July 15, 2002
Format: Paperback
I was raised in a Pullman train car on the ground next to the Southern Pacific railroad in Southern Oregon so I saw many hobos, bums, and tramps over the years. I spoke with them from time-to-time and "Steam Train" Maury Graham's book was right on. My dad ,who worked for the railroad, was also against giving anything to the people who would knock on the door for fear that it would encourage others. But during the day if one came to the door my mom would fix them one or two cheese sandwiches. I still recall how she said one time she watched him as he walked back to the train and finished the sandwiches as he walked so he wouldn't have to share with the others in the train. The railroad yard in my community was too small for a "Bull" so when they were spotted by the railroad workers they just told them to stay out of sight and catch the next train on-ward. This book is filled with information about a culture that has nearly disappeared. It's told in an entertaining and easy to read form. It just shows you the vast difference between the hobos of the past and the bums with signing saying that they are "Vietnam Vets looking for work" who populate many interchange corners in Texas and work the same locations for year-after-year. "Tales of the Iron Road" shares with you some of the most famous hobos of the past, poems, tricks of the "trade", recipes, and more. If you're interested in this side of railroading you'll enjoy it immensely.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Maurice Andrew Graham on January 8, 2002
Format: Paperback
I first read Tales of the iron road 10yrs ago.It was a wonderful and exciting piece of reading for me.The book informed me of my Fathers history and heritage that I had not known. It also gave me bits of family history on my fathers side that I wasnt aware of. Many years have seperated my father Steam Train Maury graham and I,but reading this book has somehow connected me to a man that Ihad heard little of as I was groing up. I will cherish it forever and never stop believing or caring for the man whom I thought was as a child my hero. Sincerely, Maurice Andrew Graham
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?