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Tales of Mithgar Paperback – Bargain Price, December 1, 1995

14 customer reviews

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Paperback, Bargain Price, December 1, 1995
$137.20 $1.55

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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

These 11 tales, set in the land of Mithgar, take place at an inn called the One-Eyed Crow. Whether offering whimsical "proof" for the existence of giants or relating a somber tale of war's false glory, the author of The Eye of the Hunter (LJ 9/15/92) displays a genuine flair for pacing, characters, and drama-all essential to the storyteller's art. A good choice for most fantasy collections.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

McKiernan here uses his increasingly popular world of Mithgar as a background for 11 tales told in an inn called the One-Eyed Crow by a bunch of storytellers gathered to practice their art. Particularly appealing are "The Thornwalker and the Wolf," "The Dammsel," and "The Ruffian and the Giant." As in the rest of his creations, McKiernan employs classic fantasy elements, using them better in each new work. He also reveals an unexpected deftness at writing short fantasy stories, which is more than can be said of a good many of his colleagues and may help him avoid turning good short stories into less than good novels as the years roll on. Any McKiernan fan is bound to ask for and be pleased by this one. Fantasy collections, proceed accordingly. Roland Green --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Series: Mithgar
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Roc (December 1, 1995)
  • ISBN-10: 0451454391
  • ASIN: B001PIHSZQ
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 0.7 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,994,375 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dennis L. McKiernan on March 27, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Tales of Mithgar" is back in print, and is rereleased as a companion piece to "Red Slippers: More Tales of Mithgar." I wrote the original "Tales" way back when ... and the main reason for doing so was so that I could explore more of the nature of Warrows in their natural surroundings of the Boskydells. I will naturally give this collection of stories a five star rating. :) I do hope you enjoy them. But the main reason for posting this review is to let you know that "Tales of Mithgar" is back in print. Best regards, Dennis L. McKiernan [...]
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "ploid" on May 26, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I liked this book the best stories were the one that is about Baron Stoke and the one where the older man and the young boy had to gurad that outpost that story was very touching and it really opens your eyes to the horrors of war. There is also a suprisingly good story about life and fishing and a king sized trout,I am an avid fisherman so I quite enjoyed that story. If you are a McKiernan fan I reccommend this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "canibalax" on July 17, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
For anyone that has not read many of McKiernan's books based on Mithgar, this is the book to buy. You will get the flavor of what it is like to be in Mithgar and if you love it you'll know you should read more of his novels. If you're already accustomed to the world of Mithgar, there are at least 2 wonderful stories in here that you should read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stella B. Inchaurregui on January 22, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Tales of Mithgar," though the first collection of short stories in McKiernan's Mithgarian sagas, is an essential to the collection for any fan of this series. Though many readers may pass up this book of "small" tales in favor of one of the epic novels - I highly advise you give it a second glance.
The long awaited first three encounters of Baron Stoke by Tomlin, Petal, Riatha, and Urus are included in the collection; so if you're a fan of his masterpiece "The Eye of the Hunter" - perhaps McKiernan's most definative creative piece - then this prequel to that adventure is a must.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 13, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The One-Eyed Crow is a place where many tales are told, a place of mystic and fun. In the One-Eyed Crow is Gaffer Tom, the best story-teller of Mithgar. And I wish I could be there, too, because I loved all of those stories and wish I could hear more of them. McKiernan's short stories can keep up with his novels, and that means a lot, because he is a great writer. More of that, Gaffer Tom!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 10, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
What were you expecting. It says right up front that it is collection of tales. There was no real 'plot'. It is a group of story tellers telling stories. Some tell good stories, some aren't quiet as adept. I would recommend it to any one. I've read every book D.M. has written and will continue to do so.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I disliked McKiernan's "Silver Call" duology and Iron Tower trilogy. But I was pleasantly surprised by this collection of short stories -- they tended to be tighter, better-written and often funny or cute. And even if I didn't dislike them, they didn't annoy me as much. (Methinks McKiernan's talents are better suited to small, personal stories rather than epic sagas)
This series of stories opens in the One Eyed Crow, a Warrow pub, during a really horrible blizzard. As a result, the people in it end up telling stories to each other to pass the time and occupy their minds. Among the first is "The Thornwalker and the Wolf", a nice little story about a Warrow who ends up in a wolf den during a snowstorm. "Trout of the Rillmix" is touching, but telling any more would ruin it. "Ruffian and the Giant" is amusing in places, but overall feels kind of strained and hard to follow. "Agron's Army" has three things going for it -- tight plotting, an intriguing conclusion, and some passages from the POV of one of Modru's Hloks. "The Helborne Drum" was something I didn't understand at all. "The Transformation of Beau Darby" was very, very cute, especially for the people who liked the "Hel's Crucible" duology. "The Dammsel" is sad and sweet. "For Want Of A Copper Coin" is also cute, a nice little story about a Warrow competing with a Man.

What's the problem? Well, interspersed through these stories are three interconnected tales that lead up to "Eye of the Hunter." (I haven't read it, but I know what it's about) This follows an Elf lady (I refuse to use the term "Elfess") named Riatha, a shapeshifting Baeran named Urus, and a pair of Warrows named Tomlin and Petal as they hunt the horrifying Baron Stoke, a psychotic sorcerer who has killed loved ones of each one of them.
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