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Tales of the long bow Unknown Binding – 1925


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Cassell and company, ltd (1925)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0006AJJPG
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

GK Chesterton was born in London in 1874 and educated at St Paul's School, before studying art at the Slade School. In 1896, he began working for the London publisher, Redway, and also T. Fisher Unwin as a reader where he remained until 1902. During this time he undertook his first freelance journalistic assignments writing art and literary reviews. He also contributed regular columns to two newspapers: the Speaker (along with his friend Hilaire Belloc) and the Daily News. Throughout his life he contibuted further articles to journals, particularly The Bookman and The Illustrated London News. His first two books were published; two poetry collections, in 1900. These were followed by collections of essays and in 1903 by his most substantial work to that point; a study of Robert Browning. Chesterton's first novel, 'The Napoleon of Notting Hill' was published in 1904. In this book he developed his political attitudes in which he attacked socialism, big business and technology and showed how they become the enemies of freedom and justice. These were themes which were to run throughout his other works. 'The Man who was Thursday' was published in 1908 and is perhaps the novel most difficult to understand, although it is also his most popular. 'The Ball and the Cross' followed in 1910 and 'Manalive' in 1912. Chesterton's best-known fictional character appears in the Father Brown stories, the first of the collection, 'The Innocence of Father Brown', being published in 1911. Brown is a modest Catholic priest who uses careful psychology to put himself in the place of the criminal in order to solve the crime. His output was prolific, with a great variety of books from brilliant studies of Dickens, Shaw, and RL Stevenson to literary criticism. He also produced more poetry and many volumes of political, social and religious essays. Tremendous zest and energy, with a mastery of paradox, puns, a robust humour and forthright devotion along with great intelligence characterise his entire output. In the years prior to 1914 his fame was at its height, being something of a celebrity and seen as a latter day Dr Johnson as he frequented the pubs and offices of Fleet Street. His huge figure was encased in a cloak and wide brimmed hat, with pockets full of papers and proofs. Chesterton came from a nominlly Anglican family and had been baptized into the Church of England. However, he had no particular Christian belief and was in fact agnostic for a time. Nevertheless, in his late --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Whelan on November 8, 2012
Format: Paperback
Someone, I suppose, told Chesterton that his ideas regarding distributivism could never work. He was evidently inspired to write this series of interconnected tales, set in modern times, each somehow dealing with the achievement of an impossible thing. The ultimate goal is to agitate for his distributivist agenda (Land distribution among the common folk).

I don't know if distributivism could be made to work. But (sorry G.K.) these stories do not work. I tried to like them, but I found myself becoming increasingly bored.

Chesterton has written quite a few good short stories. But he seems to be at his best when he does not stray too far from the "detective story" format. Aside from his Father Brown stories, which can be quite good, you can also try:

"The Man Who Knew Too Much" (Horne Fisher stories)
"The Poet and the Lunatics" (Gabriel Gale stories).
"The Club of Queer Trades" (Basil Grant stories).

All of which are better than "Tales of the Long Bow". (I here consider only his short stories - many of his essays and novels are also worth reading).
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