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Can We Talk about Race?: And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation (Race, Education, and Democracy Series Book) Paperback – April 1, 2008


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Can We Talk about Race?: And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation (Race, Education, and Democracy Series Book) + Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other Conversations About Race
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Product Details

  • Series: Race, Education, and Democracy Series Book
  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Beacon Press (April 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807032859
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807032855
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #88,690 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Ten years ago, Tatum's book asked the question, Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? Her latest book follows up with a broader question about the nation's readiness to talk honestly about the forces that continue to make race such a thorny issue. In separate essays, Tatum probes the impact of continued segregation in public schools--mostly the result of segregated neighborhoods--on classroom achievement; the difficulty of developing and sustaining interracial relationships in a society that practices silence on race; and the longer-term implications of continued segregation on a changing democracy with a growing nonwhite population. Tatum blends policy analysis and personal recollections as an educator and self-described "integration baby," born just after the momentous Brown v.Board of Education decision, into a cogent look at the forces that continue to separate the races and the urgent need to begin an honest dialogue. Tatum's analysis is a probing and ambitious start of a series of books to prod national discussion on issues of race, education, and democracy. Vanessa Bush
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"What Tatum seeks to do above all is trigger sometimes challenging discussions about race, and infuse those discussions with a reality-based focus on how race affects us all. Her latest book does that beautifully, asking touch questions, and patiently, inclusively seeking answers."—Boston Globe

"Ten years ago, Tatum's book asked the question, 'Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?' Her latest book follows up with a broader question about the nation's readiness to talk honestly about the forces that continue to make race such a thorny issue . . . A probing and ambitious start to a series of books to prod national discussion on issues of race, education, and democracy."—Vanessa Bush, Booklist

"Four research-rich, concisely written essays on race and education, including examinations of the 'resegregation of our schools,' the need for educational curricula and staff that respect the diverse communities they serve, [and] the challenges of interracial friendships . . . What Tatum seeks to do above all is trigger sometimes challenging discussions about race, and infuse those discussions with a reality-based focus on how race affects us all. Her latest book does that beautifully, asking tough questions, and patiently, inclusively seeking answers."—Chuck Leddy, Boston Globe

"Another thoughtful, personal and provocative book that will encourage discussion about many of the difficult issues still surrounding race in America—in and out of the classroom."—Marian Wright Edelman, president, Children's Defense Fund

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By AfroAmericanHeritage on February 20, 2009
Format: Paperback
I was halfway through this book when a family health crisis distracted me. A lot has happened since then, including the election of the first African American president. According to many white pundits, January 20 2009 marked the official end of racism in America...making this book all the more critical because now we're even LESS likely to talk openly and honestly about race than we were before.

Each chapter in the book is based on a lecture in the "Race, Education and Democracy" series at Simmons College. In each, the author seamlessly weaves together personal experience, current events, factual data and policy analysis to help us not only understand where we are, but where we need to be and how we might get there.

The first chapter explains that school segregation (or as she puts it, "resegregation") is still very much with us, and what needs to happen if we are to move beyond it. The second chapter examines why this even matters: because race in American classrooms is effecting achievement. The third chapter explores the thorny issue of cross-racial friendships, and questions whether we can have social change if we don't have interpersonal social connection. The final chapter takes us in search of wisdom, providing examples of ways to cultivate leadership.

This book is more timely than ever. In a way, I'm glad I waited to finish it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Rivello on January 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book succesfuly explains how our society has grown to accept a school system that often fails minority children. The reasons and some wonderful solutions are explained in a clear and knowledgable manner.
It highlights the important role of white teachers and how as the majority of the educators (especially in elementary school) they can change our schools for the better, for all children.
This book is a must for parents-who can gain valuable information about our school system to use to their advantage and therefore their community.
I feel blessed for reading this and empowered.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Clarice on September 1, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The best book ever on the dismal educational system. This book not only speaks to African American youth but all youth being separated because of innate racism in America, the only place on earth that IS a melting pot. Well written and a MUST read for anyone who wants to teach is teaching and has taught. From Kindergarden to college this is a must read. And after reading it- DO SOMETHING to change this system that is not working for our future.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By MAXIMILLIAN MUHAMMAD HALL OF FAME on April 29, 2007
Format: Hardcover
this book is very detailed about Race in America and also the effects within the school structure. it examines why there is a strong feeling of Resegregation in schools and Beyond that is legal without as so much as a Why or how come and why has it come back to this?? this Book asks those Questions and gives Answers at how Education can truly knock those walls away if given the full push it needs. Beverly Daniel Tatum, PHD does a Fantastic Job in this Book in detailing and offering solutions for a Better Tommorrow and Future. but Her words need to be heeded today. Education is the Key. a must have and read book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Max Golding on December 10, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I can't say I'm disappointed but Tatum's greatest book for me is still Black Kids In The Cafeteria. This one is a little too dry and academic. And I understand that she is an academic, but the other book was so much more accessible. It was written for newbies to wrap their heads around the psychological research around racial identity development. This one seems more to be written for educators and administrators. Maybe that's just me wanting this book to have been the other book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Olivia Pomata on July 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book was a little difficult to read. Not that the vocabulary was difficult, the information was just presented in a plain way.
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