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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on February 20, 2009
I was halfway through this book when a family health crisis distracted me. A lot has happened since then, including the election of the first African American president. According to many white pundits, January 20 2009 marked the official end of racism in America...making this book all the more critical because now we're even LESS likely to talk openly and honestly about race than we were before.

Each chapter in the book is based on a lecture in the "Race, Education and Democracy" series at Simmons College. In each, the author seamlessly weaves together personal experience, current events, factual data and policy analysis to help us not only understand where we are, but where we need to be and how we might get there.

The first chapter explains that school segregation (or as she puts it, "resegregation") is still very much with us, and what needs to happen if we are to move beyond it. The second chapter examines why this even matters: because race in American classrooms is effecting achievement. The third chapter explores the thorny issue of cross-racial friendships, and questions whether we can have social change if we don't have interpersonal social connection. The final chapter takes us in search of wisdom, providing examples of ways to cultivate leadership.

This book is more timely than ever. In a way, I'm glad I waited to finish it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on January 22, 2008
This book succesfuly explains how our society has grown to accept a school system that often fails minority children. The reasons and some wonderful solutions are explained in a clear and knowledgable manner.
It highlights the important role of white teachers and how as the majority of the educators (especially in elementary school) they can change our schools for the better, for all children.
This book is a must for parents-who can gain valuable information about our school system to use to their advantage and therefore their community.
I feel blessed for reading this and empowered.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 1, 2011
The best book ever on the dismal educational system. This book not only speaks to African American youth but all youth being separated because of innate racism in America, the only place on earth that IS a melting pot. Well written and a MUST read for anyone who wants to teach is teaching and has taught. From Kindergarden to college this is a must read. And after reading it- DO SOMETHING to change this system that is not working for our future.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 29, 2012
Dr. Tatum has you look at race from a very different perspective. I've learned so much from this required reading for my graduate school class. I highly recommend this to anyone who is a teacher or who is considering teaching. Great read!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 10, 2013
I can't say I'm disappointed but Tatum's greatest book for me is still Black Kids In The Cafeteria. This one is a little too dry and academic. And I understand that she is an academic, but the other book was so much more accessible. It was written for newbies to wrap their heads around the psychological research around racial identity development. This one seems more to be written for educators and administrators. Maybe that's just me wanting this book to have been the other book.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
this book is very detailed about Race in America and also the effects within the school structure. it examines why there is a strong feeling of Resegregation in schools and Beyond that is legal without as so much as a Why or how come and why has it come back to this?? this Book asks those Questions and gives Answers at how Education can truly knock those walls away if given the full push it needs. Beverly Daniel Tatum, PHD does a Fantastic Job in this Book in detailing and offering solutions for a Better Tommorrow and Future. but Her words need to be heeded today. Education is the Key. a must have and read book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 19, 2013
This book was a little difficult to read. Not that the vocabulary was difficult, the information was just presented in a plain way.
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on June 16, 2013
This is a book all teachers should read. Not only did it provide me with a helpful account of the history of segregation, resegregation and racism in American schools, it also convicted me personally, as it helped to reveal things I take for granted in my own teaching. Had it not been assigned in my summer class, I probably would have missed out Dr. Tatum's thought-provoking insights. I know this book will change the way I teach in the future, and I'm thankful I had the opportunity to read it closely and critically.
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on November 3, 2014
I had to get this book for my English class. It was very interesting. Tatum points out some key facts and makes us realize what we are still doing... though not meaning to be racist we may be subconsciously, treating people every so slightly differently that it makes a big enough impact.
Tatum did not hold back, she was to the point and proved her point well.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on March 21, 2013
How can we talk about race when we pretend there is no such thing as Asian people?

What do we say when one ethnic minority group is overlooked and invisible?
>> We say their voices are silenced.
>> We say they are marginalized.
>> We say their experience is not affirmed.
>> We say those things are BAD when they happen to Blacks and Latinos, but it must be fine to do it to Asians, because this book does.

The statistics on Asians (even first-generation immigrants, non-English speaking students, and impoverished Asians) blow away the "Systemic Racism of Impossible America" theme Dr. Tatum has going on in this book. Asian immigrant and Asian ethnic cultural successes demolish the theory that WHITE PRIVILEGE is the only thing holding back minority students.

If your statistics are make-believe, how reliable can your book be?

Culture counts.

For a reality check, read Walter Williams: Race and Economics: How Much Can Be Blamed on Discrimination? (HOOVER INST PRESS PUBLICATION)
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