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Taming Globalization: International Law, the U.S. Constitution, and the New World Order Hardcover – March 8, 2012


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (March 8, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199837422
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199837427
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,465,952 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"This splendid book gives a comprehensive statement of a jurisprudence of democratic constitutional sovereignty in the United States, even in a globalizing world, against liberal internationalism and its efforts to rewrite American law as a regulatory sub-branch of globalization. It goes well beyond a re-statement of democratic sovereignty, however, to offer new arguments that are sure to be debated sharply among foreign relations and federalism scholars of all kinds, a vigorously argued claim of the role of individual states in implementing and interpreting international law."
--Ken Anderson, Professor of Law, American University


"In their provocative new book, John Yoo and Julian Ku vigorously defend the primacy of the U.S. Constitution in every area of globalization-trade, treaties and more. Yes, the U.S. often must cooperate with other countries to tackle global problems but it must do so in line with Constitutional principles. Their arguments are compelling, their prose is vigorous, and their analysis is often surprising."
--Melanie Kirkpatrick, Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute, and former deputy editorial page editor, The Wall Street Journal.


"With nuance and clarity, John Yoo and Julian Ku develop ideas about how domestic U.S. actors can account for international law in a way that is consistent with popular sovereignty under the Constitution. This should be essential reading for senators and their staffers who have to consider whether to ratify treaties only if they are non-self-executing, for judges and their clerks who have to choose when to refer to foreign laws and when not to do so, and for officials who have to decide when to obey or disobey customary international law. This book stands to shift debates among scholars from tired fights about whether or not international law is really 'law' to more a useful discussion about what decisionmakers ought to do in pressing international legal problems."
--Tai-Heng Cheng, Professor of Law and Co-Director, Institute for Global Law, Justice, & Policy at New York Law School


"The book offers a strong critique of transnationalist claims and advances a defense of US constitutional and political sovereignty...the book provides a carefully constructed argument."
--CHOICE, M.F. Cairo, Transylvania University


About the Author


Julian Ku is Professor of Law at Hofstra University Law School. Before joining the Hofstra faculty in 2002, Professor Ku served as a law clerk to Judge Jerry Smith of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, and as an Olin Fellow and Lecturer in Law at the University of Virginia Law School. Professor Ku has also been a visiting professor at the College of William & Mary Marshall-Wythe School of Law, and was the Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer in Law at East China University of Political Science and Law in Shanghai, China. Professor Ku received his J.D. from Yale Law School.

John Yoo is Professor of Law at the University of California-Berkeley's Boalt Hall Law School. From 2001 to 2003 he served as Assistant Attorney General in the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel. He has also served as a Visiting Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute since 2003 and as General Counsel for the U.S. Senate's Judiciary Committee. Professor Yoo received his J.D. from Yale Law School and clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Victoria Ferauge on May 13, 2012
Format: Hardcover
In fact, I would say this is a must-read for anyone interested in the intersection between national and international law. Focus here is primarily on the impact on U.S. law but they do mention the EU. The chapter on Globalization and Sovereignty was especially good. The authors do a fine job of making some very complex concepts accessible to a general audience.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The book arrived on time and in the condition described. The subject matter was somewhat different than I assumed, but that mistake is mine. Interestingly while the authors (especially Yoo) are normally on the conservative side of International law writers, on domestic SCOTUS case law they are very mainstream.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Damon on June 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book has opened my eyes to the many treaties and laws throughout the world. While at times I did not agree with all of them. I felt the powers of the president should have more say in international laws. Some of the agreements should be voted on by the congess ie. the senate and the house of representatives. In some instances treaties and laws have opened up areas that were once off limits to americans such as the Congo. What is acceptable in one country may not be accepted here. We all live on this planet called earth. If there is to be peace in the world we need to educate the world how to work smarter not harder. For example guloggs and work camps. The International Waters Treaty is under constant threat from the United Nations. This is a very disturbing trend.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By j d on December 10, 2013
Format: Hardcover
John Yoo holds very unique views on the US constitution and other US laws. He believes they give the president the power to torture captives. These views are unAmerican and should be scorned by all who value freedom. Shame on John Yoo.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Shmooly on April 21, 2013
Format: Hardcover
John Yoo, the guy who wrote the Patriot Act and the torture memos, which suggested recommended the use of 'binding, waterboarding, and sleep deprivation' amongst other "strategies" to 'interrogate' subjects suspected of ties to terrorism (because we know how painstakingly careful this selection process is and how accurate testimonials from tortured subjects are!) is writing a book on taming globalization, the constitution (what's that?) and the New World Order. Laughable.

Nice try, Mr. Chickenhawk.
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