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Taming Your Sav: The Savannah Monitor As A Household Pet Paperback – January 12, 2008

9 customer reviews

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Paperback, January 12, 2008
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 50 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace (January 12, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 143483655X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1434836557
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,915,254 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By S. Sweet on August 24, 2008
There is nothing wrong with treating a small dog as you would a treasured child, and many dogs are bred to this standard. It is something else entirely to force wild-caught lizards to exist this way -- they suffer and die, as did both of the featured animals in this bizarre book. Like circus ringmasters, the authors play to the crowd while dispensing some of the worst advice imaginable about the care of savannah monitors, along the way scoffing at the laws of physics, principles of physiology, and hard-won experience of serious hobbyists. They drown and "rescue" their lizards to "tame" them, advocate keeping them in your bed and in your clothing, and expect them to eat from your mouth, among other things. Buzzy and Lilly (both males, in fact) became morbidly obese from inappropriate food and temperatures, and both died in less than two years (in less than 10% of their potential captive lifespan). The authors did not miss a beat, learned nothing, and continue to advocate cruel and abusive treatment under a banner of caring.

This is not quaint, idiosyncratic or "cute" advice -- it is animal abuse with looneytunes background music.

There are several good books and pamphlets on savannah monitor care, all of them predicated on the realization that reptiles are not lapdogs and have different physiologies and needs. They can be rewarding pets if these needs are understood and provided. This site does not allow a zero- or minus-star rating -- it is not a one-star book!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Alan S. Moser on September 9, 2008
This book is horrible, a perfect guide on how not to do things. How this thing is available in print is beyond comprehension. There are a million other books marginally better than this one that are actually written by people with REAL experience and intelligence.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Vanessa on July 28, 2011
The title says it all. ¨The Savannah Monitor as a Household Pet¨.
A Savannah Monitor is supossed to live like one, not as a Household Pet.
If you want one, ok, go ahead and buy one. But respect him/her and accept that your ¨pet¨has to live like he or she would live in the wild.
I don't mean that you can't get your monitor to like you and not hurt you, that's cool, but ¨taming¨...
Buying a lizard is not about turning him into a dog.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By caseyp on July 5, 2012
This book doesn't deserve any stars but ones the lowest. All the practices in this book will kill your monitor. I realize the book is not about husbandry but is more about taming the monitor, but by letting the monitor roam loose in a house, it's slowly dying. Monitors need high temperatures, a human house can't safely be that temperature. Plan on turning your heater up? Yeah, see how much that costs in a week. Furthermore, the monitor could easily ingest something dangerous, get trapped or injured while free roaming. The furniture will be history. Lizard poop and pee will be everywhere. And just watch what those claws do to your hardwood floors. Monitors also NEED to dig, unless you plan on putting 2 feet of dirt on all your floors, this need won't be satisfied. As a result you can expect the monitor to turn to your carpets and floors. The only reason the monitor would be docile is because It would be severely dehydrated (your house would need to be at least 60% humidity, oh about several humidifiers per room), Would be cold and appear docile because of that. This results in a long slow and painful death from dehydration, gout and kidney disease. The monitor may SEEM fine, these lizards are tanks even under the worst of conditions it takes a long time to kill one. But then one day, you'll find a DEAD monitor. Google the author, you'll find her monitors never even reached the age of 5. I think they were 3 when they died. Monitors can live 20 years, so what does that tell you? Furthermore the only reason her animals are so docile is because they are very obese and very dehydrated. I can tell this by looking at pictures. Stay far way from this book. This won't teach you to tame a Savannah, it will teach you how to get it so weak and lethargic that it just doesn't have the energy to resist.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By LbUnforgettable on September 19, 2013
Verified Purchase
It thin and small and doesn't look very interesting to my husband. I bought it almost a year ago as a Xmas gift and my husband still has only skimmed through it.... Not sure if it was worth the buy! Will redo this review if he try's it out more
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