Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Appearance of only slight previous use. Cover and binding show a little wear. All pages are undamaged with potentially only a few, small markings. Help save a tree. Buy all your used books from Green Earth Books. Read. Recycle and Reuse.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tao Te Ching: A New Translation Hardcover – June 12, 2012

13 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, June 12, 2012
$18.99 $0.01

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Renders the classic anew and authentically, accompanied by Chinese ink paintings and ancillary material.”—Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Not much is known about the legendary Lao Tzu, to whom authorship of the Tao Te Ching is popularly attributed. Some scholars believe the author was an elder contemporary of Confucius.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Shambhala; 1 Reprint edition (June 12, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159030991X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590309919
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 0.9 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,544,068 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Terry Tozer on April 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover
You'll be very surprised to find that this isn't just 'yet another boring translation' of an ancient Chinese text. As perfectly described above in the synopsis, William Scott Wilson has added two extra interesting & highly relevant chapters on "Zen and Taoism" and "Zen and the Martial Arts".

Funny how we keep on reinventing the wheel in ours lives, when the secrets to successful living (if there ever were any?) are all around us & were thoughtfully written down for us thousands of years ago in some cases.

WSW, as always, makes these sometimes difficult essays easier to access by writing them with the reader in mind & not just dumping the contents of his brain onto paper. His new research into the Tao Te Ching brings out more of its meaning & makes it more understandable. You may need to use a little grey matter on some of the verses & it's certainly not a book that one can just skim through.

Backed up with an nice long & interesting introduction about the books history & it's characters, it also has extensive notes to help the reader with the dialog.

I've read many different versions of this classic & to date this one was a pleasure to read & didn't leave me with more questions than answers.

WSW's writing style is relaxed & friendly & not full of 'long' unpronounceable words that you need a dictionary for. Definitely worth a re-read & one for the bedside.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By R. A. Martinek on April 10, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
William Scott Wilson is a careful researcher and translator, intent on conveying as accurately as possible the intent of the original author(s). He is careful to tell the reader when something is difficult to translate precisely into English, gives alternative meanings, and explains the author's point of view when necessary, based on Wilson's long study of the author's history and culture. When I compare Wilson's translations and discussion to others, I uniformly find his superior. If you are looking for a single, excellent translation of the Tao Te Ching, you need look no further.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Michael P. Maslanka on April 6, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I have read several translations and Wilson takes a more expansive approach to the translation, not the more mimimalist approach of others. The result:a clearer understanding of the intent behind the passages. As a lawyer, number 69 speaks directly to me:"There is no greater disaster /than making light of your opponent/making light of your opponent almost always/results in losing your treasures/as easily as leaves fall from the trees." The book itself is also lusher than other translations, with renderings of wood cut prints. Essays on the background of the Tao and its relationship to Zen are useful and illuminating.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Eric Gross VINE VOICE on July 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I have studied and loved the Tao Te Ching since I was a teenager (and that is a long, long time ago). I stumbled on this translation while in an actual bookstore. Intrigued, I started sampling various chapters. I also wanted to see if this translator presented a reason for yet another translation of this most translated of all works. Alas, he didn't, but that really doesn't matter at all. The reason for this new translation becomes quite apparent when reading these wonderful verses. It's wonderful, powerful, concise (without being too concise and literal like some translations), and simply awe inspiring in its power to arouse the effortless truth in this moment. Very highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 7, 2013
Format: Hardcover
By far my favorite translation of the Tao. The history and other additions are well done, and the book contains copious notes in regard to the translation. In the past I have preferred more traditional works by Chinese translators, but this book has helped to change that.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Magic Lemur on July 10, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Initially this book seemed like yet another beginners guide to Taoism but, once I got into it, it struck me that it is actually one of those wonderful books that hits the right balance between academic rigour and readability.

The first thing to mention is the translation. As with most translations of ancient books, it claims to be the first sourced from the original documents which may explain how it has lost much of the accumulated 'flow' that has built up through the years. Despite this not being one of my favourites, it is second only to that of John Wu and is accessible, if occasionally in-eloquent.

Secondly there are the essays. The first essay (before the 81 verses is about Tao and Zen. In this essay were some fascinating insights, such as 'Zen is like a stone woman giving birth to a child at midnight, and there are also some interesting observations as to how Zen is basically an Indian version of Tao (in the words of the notes at the back "Tao is Zen with Chinese jokes").
This essay is then continued after the 81 verses and moves on to even more insightful and weird interpretations (e.g. "The Tao that be explained" = Eat good food in the Morning; "is not the eternal Tao" - this is to have a bowel movement in the evening. He also explores the 'Patriarchs of the Tao' (e.g. Bodhidharma), which is like discovering a whole new religion you never knew existed.
Moving on from this, the second essay ('Tao and the Martial arts') makes some fascinating comparisons between the two 'Tzu's (Lao Tzu and Sun Tzu) - by comparing The Art of War and the Tao Te Ching.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: eastern philosophy