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Taro-san the Fisherman and the Weeping Willow Tree Paperback – December 9, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 52 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (December 9, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 148027478X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1480274785
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 8.4 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,509,777 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

 "An exquisite choice for juvenile audiences age 7 and up." - Children's Bookwatch, Vol. 23, no. 2 (February 2013)

"The actual written story is not only touching, it is also well-worded and evenly paced. Hatch found a great artist to craft wonderful illustrations in a traditional Japanese style that fits the words perfectly... Buy this book!" - Jim Kleefeld, M-U-M, vol. 102, number 10 (March 2013)

"A simple story, one that will appeal to youngsters old enough to read." - Sharon Haddock, Deseret News (February 2, 2013)

About the Author

Richard Hatch holds two graduate degrees in Physics from Yale University, but finds it easier apparently to violate the laws of nature than to discover them. A childhood interest in magic became a lifelong obsession after he met and was encouraged by the German magician Fredo Raxon in 1970. A full time professional “deceptionist” since 1983, Richard moved with his wife, violinist Rosemary Kimura, to Houston, Texas in 1985, shortly after winning first place in the annual New England Close Up Magic Competition in Worcester, Massachusetts. For several years he honed his craft entertaining the guests as one of the house magicians at Houston's Magic Island Nightclub before devoting himself exclusively to private and corporate work, traveling internationally on behalf of his clients. A member of both the International Brotherhood of Magicians and the Society of American Magicians, until recently Richard was also co-owner with Charlie Randall of H & R Magic Books, the world’s largest purveyors of magic books (www.magicbookshop.com). Among magicians he is perhaps best known for his research on the identity of “S. W. Erdnase”, the mysterious author of the 1902 classic, Artifice, Ruse and Subterfuge at the Card Table, and as the translator from German into English of works about Johann Nepomuk Hofzinser (1806 – 1875), Paul Potassy, and the first four volumes of Roberto Giobbi’s acclaimed Card College course of card manipulation. Richard and Rosemary moved to Logan, Utah in October 2010 where they opened the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music (www.hatchacademy.com) in the historic 1878 Thatcher-Young Mansion. They have two children, Catherine and Jonathan. The story of “Taro-san the fisherman and the weeping willow tree” evolved over time from Rosemary and Richard’s ensemble performances of the Japanese feat of tamasudare, with Rosemary playing a solo violin transcription of Michio Miyagi’s “Haru no Umi (The Sea of Spring)”.

More About the Author

Richard Hatch holds two graduate degrees in Physics from Yale University, but finds it easier apparently to violate the laws of nature than to discover them. A childhood interest in magic became a lifelong obsession after he met and was encouraged by the German magician Fredo Raxon in 1970. A full time professional "deceptionist" since 1983, Richard moved with his wife, violinist Rosemary Kimura, to Houston, Texas in 1985, shortly after winning first place in the annual New England Close Up Magic Competition in Worcester, Massachusetts. For several years he honed his craft entertaining the guests as one of the house magicians at Houston's Magic Island Nightclub before devoting himself exclusively to private and corporate work, traveling internationally on behalf of his clients. A member of both the International Brotherhood of Magicians and the Society of American Magicians, until recently Richard was also co-owner with Charlie Randall of H & R Magic Books, the world's largest purveyors of magic books (www.magicbookshop.com). Among magicians he is perhaps best known for his research on the identity of "S. W. Erdnase", the mysterious author of the 1902 classic, Artifice, Ruse and Subterfuge at the Card Table, and as the translator from German into English of works about Johann Nepomuk Hofzinser (1806 - 1875), Paul Potassy, and the first four volumes of Roberto Giobbi's acclaimed Card College course of card manipulation. Richard and Rosemary moved to Logan, Utah in October 2010 where they opened the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music (www.hatchacademy.com) in the historic 1878 Thatcher-Young Mansion. They have two children, Catherine and Jonathan.

Customer Reviews

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The story is compelling and the illustrations are superb.
Joseph A Hanosek
Japanese Kanji characters with English show children the cross cultural nature of language.
David Sharp
It is also a wonderfully illustrated storybook to simply sit and enjoy.
Kathleen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kathleen on December 13, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The story is charming and the illustrations enchanting. The origin of the tale is based on a traditional Japanese performance called Nankin Tamasudare. This act involves the manipulation of a special bamboo mat to create representational figures while telling a story to tie them together. This book, I think, is the author's story that accompanies his own performances. The book is not about the performance, but only the story that goes with it. The illustrations go perfectly with the hopeful tale of a Japanese boy striving to become a professional fisherman in historic Japan. The English prose with accompanying Japanese translation in kanji make this a good book for both children and adults learning English or Japanese as a second language. It is also a wonderfully illustrated storybook to simply sit and enjoy.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David Sharp on December 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
Review:
By David Sharp
Taro-san the Fisherman and the Weeping Willow Tree
Author Richard Hatch
Illustrated by Andras Balogh
Translated by Yokishige Kadoya

Taro-san the Fisherman and the Weeping Willow Tree is a beautiful children's book that should be in every library and for that matter every home where intelligent parents wish to have quality cross cultural education and enchanting stories for their children.

Every page has thoughtful narration of a gentle story of the dream of Taro-san to become a fisherman. The magic of the Kanji characters painted with a brush on the hull of the boat, cast a spell to disguise it as the Willow Tree where Taro-san caught fish as a child. Yokishige Kadoya has made the translations next to the English text of the story written by Richard Hatch. Japanese Kanji characters with English show children the cross cultural nature of language. It also gives this book appeal, to be read to children in Japan as well.

The masterful Illustrations are by Andras Balogh and remind one of the beautiful water colors and block prints of Japanese master artist Hokusai during the Edo Period. (circa, 1830)

In addition to having written this wonderful book, Richard Hatch is one of the most incredible Magicians in the country. He combines storytelling with magic. Richard and his wife do a live version with the "Nankin Tamasudare", in which a bamboo mat is transformed into a myriad of figures to illustrate the story. Rosemary Hatch performs music on the Violin to match the narration and punctuate the magical transformations for Richard's story.

Enchantment is the best word to describe this book and its author.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Joseph A Hanosek on December 21, 2012
Format: Paperback
This is a great book and a nice departure from the standard kids books I've bought in the past like "Pinkalicious" and "Don't Say That Word". The story is compelling and the illustrations are superb. I can only imagine the wonder created as the author performs Nankin Tamasudare.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By B. Robinson on January 3, 2013
Format: Paperback
I was given this book as a present for my birthday. What a joy! As one who fancies ancient tales from Asia, this was a welcome addition to my library. The author, Richard Hatch, is a renowned magician, and uses this tale during his performance. Having seen Mr. Hatch's show several times, this is a very exciting addition because his performance of the "mat illusion" is only made better by this authentic tale. The book itself is very handsome and the two-page illustrations are gripping and complement the narrative very well. I have seen my share of translations that leave me cold (The Tale of Gengi, for one), and this is NOT a dry-as-dust rehash. Instead, if you or your children seek true poetic adventure on the page, then look no further. For the price, this little book sure packs a wallop. I heartily give it the most vibrant of "thumbs up." Sometimes the simplicity of seeming "small projects" are the hardest to do because distilling the essence(s) of quaint historical tales must be "jazzed up" for the modern reader. Not so in this case. (The same goes for native African tales retold and illustrated by NY Library Lion recipient Ashley Bryan...this book is in that category.) In fact, I'd encourage audiences and readers alike to attend Mr. Hatch's concerts of illusion and magic and then buy the book, or several, as gifts...a more surpising, well-done tome you are not going to find anytime soon. Bravo to all involved!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By mc on December 30, 2012
Format: Paperback
My daughter and I can not put this down. She is meserized by the story and the pictures. Many thanks to Mr Hatch - we can't wait to read more of his work. His is a talented writer with many fine qualities to his prose, stylistically simple to understand, truly a blessing to the reader who gets this in their hands.
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