Trade in your item
Get a $7.07
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tarot and the Journey of the Hero Paperback – May 1, 2000


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$74.59 $38.36

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 236 pages
  • Publisher: Weiser Books; 1ST edition (May 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1578631173
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578631179
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 7.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #809,446 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
12
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 14 customer reviews
A must for any serious Tarot Fan!
T. Radivojevic
Banzhaf offers an insightful look at relating Jungian psychology and the Tarot.
Patricia Croteau
It is a pleasure to read visually and in terms of the thought it provokes.
K S

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 39 people found the following review helpful By K S on January 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
I'm by no means a Tarot, psychology or any other sort of scholar. What I am is a person who has been deeply fascinated by the place of enlightment found at the intersection of Tarot, psychology, and mythology. I itch to relate the Hero myth to Jung, Jung to Tarot, Tarot to the Hero Myth.
This book satisfactorily scratched all those itches, and more. It is a pleasure to read visually and in terms of the thought it provokes. I don't believe anyone could walk away from reading this book without having been enriched in many ways. Its diversity in the cultural, mythological, philosophical, and artistic traditions upon which it draws is enormous. This book could make a fine basis for teaching a university course in a number of disciplines.
I will leave you, gentle Amazon reader, to the wisdom of other reviewers, but I urge your consideration of this book. I believe you will not be sorry.
Enjoy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Geraldine Amaral on July 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
Tarot and the Journey of the Hero By Hajo Banzhaf Reviewed by Geraldine Amaral
If you like archetypal Tarot that explores the universal energies operating in the Tarot images, then you will probably love this book. Loaded with beautiful color pictures and images, it is well-organized, clearly written, logical. Its premise is that the hero's journey is an allegory for our human life path and that in the Tarot, the hero is the Fool. There is a chapter for each Major Arcana card that contains two key elements. The first is a detailed description and discussion of the card that is nicely filled with little tidbits of information on specific details of the card as well as, at times, some pretty deep discussion about the details and imagery. The second section, at the end of each chapter is a box that contains keywords for each Major card)." These are pithy little summaries of various aspect of the archetype. For example, keywords for the Fool are:
Archetype: The child, the naïve simpleton Task: Trying out new things without any bias, playful learning Goal: Joy in life, playfully gathering experience Risk: Awkwardness, confusion, carelessness, foolishness Feeling in Life: adventurous, curiosity, sure instincts, astonished openness, carefree joy, curiosity, the desire to try things out.
Personally, I love this little summation. These keywords are excellent guideposts for understanding the essence of the archetypes and taking their meaning to a deeper level. These are clear, short synonyms for the archetype. I particularly like the "risk" concept that is provided along with the regular archetypal meaning. I liken the risk that Banzhaf provides to the negative pole of the archetype and/or the meaning of the card should it appear in a reading reversed.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Dianne Foster HALL OF FAME on March 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
If you know something about the Tarot cards, you may find TAROT AND THE JOURNEY OF THE HERO by Hajo Banzhaf contains familiar material as he agrees with much of what has been written elsewhere by Joseph Campbell and other experts. However, Banzhaf is extremely articulate, his writing clearly stated and beautifully illustrated, and his exploration of the links between the arcane language of the ancients and modern Jungian psychology rich and comprehensive.
If you are not familiar with the Tarot cards, Banzhaf's book is a good place to begin, especially if you have an interest Western literature, music, and/or the visual arts -- including Medieval and Renaissance paintings, German philosophy, and films by the Fargo Brothers such as "Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?"
Banzhaf is a very educated man who has studied religious and/or mythological tales and/or classical stories and appears to have an in-depth knowledge of the religious and/or philosophical nature of humans. He not only interprets key myths and tales, he explains the content of artworks from ancient India, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Italy, and Medieval Europe used to illustrate his text.
Banzhaf uses the Waite and Marseilles decks to illustrate each of the Major Arcana. Although he appreciates much of the content of the Waite deck, he challenges some of the changes Waite made relative to older decks. Banzhaf eschews discussion of the Minor Arcana suggesting these cards are more recent and may be nothing more than playing cards or cards for fortune telling. On the other hand, he views the 22 cards of Major Arcana (the Fool and his 21 stations) as the organizing principle for the classic tale of the hero -- whether Moses or Parzifal, Galahad or Ra, Gilgamesh or Jesus -- and the core story of every human life.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is a very useful book. For one, Banzhaf traces the "hero's" progress consecutively from one tarot card to the next and frames his hero's progress according to an understood direction of enlightenment. Each card is viewed as evolutionary stages that may potentially yield insight into our current spiritual, material or social placement and well-being. What I find insightful and comprehensive about Banzhaf's schema is that Banzhaf explains the "hero's" path through the use of many different religions, myths and motifs, which serve to encompass a broad perspective on what enlightenment means. This is no small feat, since the Waite deck, which Banzhaf prominently displays (as on the front cover), is very Judea-Christian. This broadening of the hero's journey, to encompass a universal experience, manages to make the heroes journey a universal journey on becoming oneself; and it therefore functions well in a number of spiritual and religious frameworks.
Banzhaf-as is characteristic of him-uses brilliantly practical language. His layout is intelligent and well presented. Each tarot card is summarized in a chart, which appears at the end of each essay, and which has the following layout: Title: Keywords for (the tarot card's name goes here); Categories: Archetype, Task, Goal, Risk, and Feeling in life. As you can see, Banzhaf's focus is always lucid and balanced.
I do wish, however, that Banzhaf had extended his approach to encompass the minor arcana, too. In the minor arcana there is also a feeling of progression, which is not quite so clean and neat as in the major arcana. The minor arcana exposes the many side paths and loopholes, which the hero will meet and be challenged with.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?