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Tarot of the Saints Cards – September 8, 2001


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Cards, September 8, 2001
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Product Details

  • Cards: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Llewellyn Publications (September 8, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1567185274
  • ISBN-13: 978-1567185270
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 2.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,902,658 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This odd, charming hybrid of a book synchronizes Christian hagiography, Gnostic mysticism, Jungian archetypes, and the Tarot deck. Place, author of Angels' Tarot and other works, draws correlations between the figures of the Major Arcana and the Christian saints that are not hard to see and appealing in their transparency: St. Nicholas as the Magician, St. Barbara as the Tower, St. Valentine for the Lovers, and so forth. While the application of saints to the predictive or prescriptive uses of Tarot may well shock conservative Christians, Place has an endearing way of weaving the saints' legends into the fabric of esoteric archetype. For larger collections. (Cards included with the book not seen.)
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Robert M. Place is an internationally known visionary artist and illustrator. He is recognized as an expert on the Western mystical tradition and the history and philosophy of the Tarot, and his work has appeared in many books and publications. Place is also the designer, illustrator, and coauthor of the highly acclaimed Alchemical Tarot and The Angels Tarot. He has appeared on The Discovery Channel and The Learning Channel and has conducted lectures and workshops throughout the country, including the Open Center and the Omega Institute in New York and the International Tarot Congress in Chicago. Place's work in precious metals have been displayed in museums such as the New York State Museum, the American Craft Museum, and the White House.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 53 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 20, 2001
"I received this deck in the mail on September 14, the day George W. Bush declared a national day of prayer and remembrance. I was shaken up that day, not only by the recent tragedy, the concern for family and friends in NYC, or the very real possibility of war that faced us all. I was shaken up by an emotional response I had to watching the days' services at the National Cathedral. I was moved by the words of Jew, Christian, Muslim. But something else took place, ... an instinctual urge to return to the religion of my early childhood.
I have never rejected Christianity. In fact, for quite a few years I was deep in study of ancient Christianity, Judaism, and Gnosticism; and Biblical language. Over time I simply moved away from it, as I delved into other religions. What I came to fully realize through the study of so many different traditions, is that they are all reaching for the same light, the same spirit. With this in mind, I can look at Christianity fairly and openly. Although I already understood that the repression and narrow-mindedness of some people, as well as the history of persecution, are not just reflections of the faith, I saw this again more distinctly through this receptive study of other religions. I can quietly roam the depths of Christianity, and find true mysticism and spirit there, again.
Tarot of the Saints is a perfect starting (or re-starting) point for this. Robert M. Place, with intelligence and skill, presents to us the great people of Christianity, those humans who gave their lives to a quest for God, and discovered the soul of God him/her/it-self. These are the men and women who endured torture, saw visions, performed miracles. They are the ones whose experiences so strongly embodied a Christian ideal, they were canonized as saints.
Who are the saints?
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 20, 2002
This is one of the most exciting tarot systems I've ever seen. It combines expert commentary on the classical tarot along with an expert synthysis of high Christian Mysticism and Gnosticism. This is a must for Christian Mystics, Occultists, Gnostics and Christo-pagans. The artwork is really cool to, having the feel of Catholic prayer cards, yet all the tarot symbolism is still there. I highly recommend this deck!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 1, 2003
This deck is truly inspired and will be especially appreciated by Christian Mystics. The illustrations are beautiful and appealing in both realistic and symbolic meaning. The companion book is well written and clearly shows how early Christianity played a major role in tarot symbology.While we know that the Trumps are meant to form a progression with each one triumphing over its predeccessor, we find in the Tarot of the Saints that each saint also represents a triumph in him-or herself; sometimes this struggle was with evil, and sometimes the struggle was with the saint's own inner nature and the victory was the spiritual transformation of the self. This in itself adds another unique dimension to these cards.I also found the readings to be very accurate. I HIGHLY recommend this!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Janet Boyer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on March 27, 2007
"During the first century of the Christian Era, Christians were honoring other Christians who had died and prayed for their intercession. However, honoring saints is not a practice created by the Church; it was part of Christianity from the very beginning--a natural practice of Christian people." - From the companion book

One of the reasons I purchased the Tarot of the Saints was because I was reading material about Christian mysticism--in particular, Teresa of Avila's Interior Castle. I wanted to expand my knowledge of Christian mystics and saints, so I thought the Tarot of the Saints would be a great opportunity to learn more--especially since I love Tarot and because Robert Place has a solid reputation as a scholar.

I began reading the 248-page companion book, excited that it was full of historical and anecdotal information about Gnosticism, early Christianity, mystics, saints, and Tarot itself. A few chapters into it, I decided to look up Teresa of Avila, dubbed St. Therese in the Tarot of the Saints deck, who was the object of the The Star card. I was pleased to discover new (to me) information on Teresa, as well as The Star itself. (One sticking point: He claims her feast day to be October 3--but it's actually October 15.)

Some of the saints, such as St. Blandina, I've never heard of--and some were notably absent from this deck (St. Bernadette). St. Stephen represents card 13, known in this deck as Martyrdom (rather than Death).

The companion book--A Gnostic Book of Saints--covers a lot of territory, including mystery religions, Greek philosophy, Gnostic theology, Pythagorean numerology, and Tarot history.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Allen J. Oh on September 24, 2001
Well, I've worked with this deck a little more, and I have to say, some of the initial appeal wore off since my previous review. I have found that a lot of my readings have been very vague with this deck. Perhaps it's just my personal taste, but I prefer a deck that gives the reader a lot of "jumping off" points. With this deck, for several cards, you can get one or maybe two meanings. By contrast, with the Rider-Waite and its progeny, you can generally find many springboards for discussion in each card.
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