Tarzan and the Lost Empire and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Out of Print--Limited Availability.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Tarzan and the Lost Empire (World Cultural Heritage Library) Paperback – September 9, 2009


See all 39 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$5.00
Paperback, September 9, 2009
--This text refers to the Kindle Edition edition.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: World Cultural Heritage Library
  • Paperback: 150 pages
  • Publisher: Intl Business Pubns USA (September 9, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1438793278
  • ISBN-13: 978-1438793276
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 28, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Tarzan and the Lost Empire" is a typical Edgar Rice Burroughs story about the Lord of the Jungle where somebody disappears and Tarzan goes off into some uncharted part of Africa to rescue them from a lost city. This basic plot describes most Tarzan novels starting with the lost Atlantis colony of Opar in "The Return of Tarzan." What makes "Tarzan and the Lost Empire" rather different from the rest is that the lost city this time around happens to be a couple of outposts from the Roman Empire, still up and running almost two thousand years later.
The person who needs to be rescued in this 12th Tarzan novel is Erich von Harben, the son of a German medical missionary who is one of the Ape Man's old friends. Tarzan tracks Erich to a lost valley where he discovers the Roman outposts. Castra Sanguinarius is ruled by Sublatus, the cruel Emperor of the West, while Castrum Mare is ruled by the tyrant Validus Augustus, the Emperor of the East. Of course Tarzan ends up in the arena of Castra Sanguinarius fighting for his life, while young Erich faces a similar fate in the arena of Castrum Mare. the ape-man was seeking to rescue him. This is standard ERB fare but the idea that all Roman outposts set up despotic emperors is laying it on a bit thick. Still, there are a few noble Romans running around for Tarzan to bond with during this adventure.
Burroughs did write a few historical adventures along with those set on exotic worlds or lost lands, so it would have been interesting to see him do a tale set in Ancient Rome, but this was as close as he got. As always with these pot-boilers, the principle is that the less of them you have read the more likely you are to be impressed by this one (and visa versa).
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Blue Tyson on August 3, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This adventure into a small lost civilisation of the past is a lot more fun than Lord of the Jungle. Tarzan is much more the focal character in this book, rather than a sideline character, so that helps.

Running around with his simian sidekick provides some comic relief, as he comes up against a couple of tinpot Caesars, manhandles one, overcomes in the arena, survives a siege, and topples some government.

Definitely entertaining.

"He rose from the throne and raised his hand for silence. The hum of voices ceased. "Caesar is dead, but upon someone of you must fall the
mantle of Caesar."

"Long live Tarzan! Long live the new Caesar!" cried one of the gladiators, and instantly every Sanguinarian in the room took up the cry."

Tarzan doesn't really fancy the job, so makes a suggestion that one of his martial Roman friends would fill the void nicely.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By microjoe TOP 500 REVIEWER on April 6, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In this story from Burroughs, while searching for a missing anthropologist that was attempting to locate a lost tribe, Tarzan stumbles on a ancient Roman lost city buried in the deepest jungles of Africa. Even more startling is that there is a group of Roman soldiers, that is alive. Another wild adventure tale from the master. In addition, this book has a very collectible cover art from Frank Frazetta, as well as his art on the title page.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brent Butler TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 7, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
One of Burroughs favorite formula plots for Tarzan was to have him find a lost civilization with two warring cities. As the series got into its middle stages he also started to drop in a second hero to carry the love interest in the story (since Tarzan was married to Jane and couldn't get involved). Oddly, by this time Jane's appearances had faded from the series. In many books she wasn't even mentioned. Tarzan's Waziri warriors were mentioned frequently, but Jane and Korak were no longer in ERB's plotting plans.

In "Tarzan and the Lost Empire" the Lord of the Jungle sets off in search of a friend's son. Both Tarzan and the friend's son wind up in a mysterious "haunted valley", which in fact is home to ... you guessed it ... rival Roman cities.

As usual, Burroughs did a great job of world building, selling the Roman/native African hybrid culture and introducing his usual cast of local villains, noble friends, fish out of water heroes, and of course, Tarzan there to save the day.

If you read this back to back with "Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle" (which has Tarzan and the secondary hero discovering rival cities of lost English Crusaders), you might find the story a bit stale, since there isn't a lot of difference. The fourth book after this, "Tarzan and the City of Gold" is more of the same.

Despite that, Burroughs always comes through with lively stories and a great feel for dynamic characterization, and this book is no exception.

Recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?