Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tarzan and the Leopard Men Mass Market Paperback – May 12, 1986


See all 25 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$9.95
Mass Market Paperback, May 12, 1986
$45.97 $2.02
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$2.50

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 35 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books (May 12, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345338286
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345338280
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,648,338 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

The first time I ever went to Tarzana, California, I walked down Ventura Boulevard, noticing that all of the buildings were really ugly. Then I arrive at my destination: a small house, set back from the street, with a beautiful tree shading the entire front yard. Inside, the air was cool and everything was polished wood, especially the incredible, gigantic desk. That's where he worked. It was awesome.

Edgar Rice Burroughs had a huge California ranch, and the land eventually became a town, named for Burroughs's most famous character. Burroughs created one of the few heroes everyone knows, and at that desk, he took Tarzan to exotic lands, had him face bizarre creatures and endless, exotic challenges. Those adventures spirit the reader away to a timeless time of action and heroism. And sitting in that office, I was a permanent convert. For me, and for countless others, the legend will never cease. And that's as it should be.
                        --Steve Saffel, Senior Editor

From the Inside Flap

The steel-clawed Leopard Men were looking for victims for their savage rites. The secret cult struck terror in the hearts of all the villagers. Only Orando of the Utengi dared to declare war on them. And with Orando went Tarzan of the Apes -- but a strangely changed Tarzan, who now believed that he was Muzimo, the spirit or demon who had been Orando's ancestor. There were traitors among Orando's people. And in the village of the Leopard Men was Kali Bwana, the white girl who had come to Africa to find a missing man. Only Tarzan could save her....

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David Adams on May 10, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Edgar Rice Burroughs wrote Tarzan and the Leopard Men, an 80,000 word novel, in a two-month period -- July 9 to September 25, 1931. 1 It is perhaps the closest to reality of Burroughs' novels, pitting the ape-man against the "Anyoto" (Leopard) society in the area around the eastern edge of the great Ituri Forest in the Belgian Congo. In this story, Tarzan quelled their activities for awhile, though one of the worst outbreaks of the Leopard Men occurred three years later in this area.

The Anioto, or Leopard Men actually existed for a long time in the Congo. It was a secret society within various native tribes, flourishing from the eighteenth century to 1936. The Anioto consisted of young men who sought to address local problems through a reign of terror in which people were killed and mutilated by iron claws, causing severe lacerations to the neck and chest. Victims were often found missing limbs or even their heads. Anioto comes from the verb, nyoto, which means to scratch, probably owes its origin to Bafwasea vernacular.

The Anyoto Society apparently originated among the Mabudu tribe in the Wamba area of the Ituri Forest, and after infiltrating the Mambela Society of the Babali tribe, the sect gradually spread south to Avakubi, Irumu, Bafwasende, and even Beni on the southeast edge of the forest, leaving a trail of mutilated bodies in its wake. Cyrier identifies the Anioto initiation ceremony as the "Mambela ceremony," which may indicate its historical filtering through this tribe. However, he indicates that the Aniyoto among the Bali has a long history into the nineteenth, perhaps even the eighteenth century.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on November 1, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Tarzan and the Leopard Men" was originally published as a six-part serial in "Blue Book Magazine" from August 1932 to January 1933. The 18th of Edgar Rice Burroughs' pulp fiction yarns about the Lord of the Jungle (and 44th overall) represents the downward spiral in the series as ERB pulls the old amnesia chestnut out to tell another story of romance and adventure in the jungles of Africa.
The story begins with a story in which a series of things happen: Kali Bwana, the story's requisite damsel in distress, is attacked in the middle of the night by Golato, the headman of her safari. Tarzan, accompanied by Nkima, his little simian friend, is knocked unconscious and trapped under a tree. Meanwhile, Nyamwegi, a native who is returning home to his village after seeing his girl friend, is attacked and killed by four of the Leopard Men, a mysterious cannibalistic cult. Orando, son of Lobongo, the chief of that same village, discovers and frees Tarzan, who no longer remembers his own name, even though he thinks the ape-man is a demon.
Both Nyamwegi and Orando had been praying to their muzimo, their protective spirit, and Orando decides that Tarzan is his muzimo, and that Nkima must be Nyamwegi's ghost. Not remembering that he is the Lord of the Jungle but still having all of his finely honed instincts and physical abilities might make accomplishing the tasks at hand more difficult, but you know that by the end of this yarn that Tarzan will put an end to the Leopard Man cult and not only rescue Kali Bwana but help her find what she is looking for in the African jungles. In other words, your basic, formulaic ERB potboiler for 23 chapters.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Chloe on September 6, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the last Tarzan books written in the series. Great reads for young people who like adventure. But watch out for evolution and discrimination. Please explain to your young person about books written long ago.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By AHF International on September 25, 2013
Format: Unknown Binding
Dust jackets made by this seller are absolutely beautiful. I bought almost everything he produced. All of them are of high quality. I was able to replaced all original jackets which unfortunately were destroyed by time. Thank you John.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?