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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tarzan tracks Jane to the strange land of Pal-ul-don
The original novel "Tarzan of the Apes" is clearly the classic Edgar Rice Burroughs novel and the one you have to read if you read only one ERB pulp fiction adventure, but all things considered "Tarzan the Terrible" is a better example of what would be the typical Burroughs yarn. The eighth book in the Tarzan series, "Tarzan the Terrible"...
Published on September 10, 2003 by Lawrance M. Bernabo

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3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent entry in the Tarzan chronicles
The writing and editing is a bit rough compared to some of E R. Burroughs' other work, but still an enjoyable romp through savage wilderness with the peerless Tarzan.
Published 6 months ago by J. Campbell


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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tarzan tracks Jane to the strange land of Pal-ul-don, September 10, 2003
By 
This review is from: Tarzan the Terrible (Paperback)
The original novel "Tarzan of the Apes" is clearly the classic Edgar Rice Burroughs novel and the one you have to read if you read only one ERB pulp fiction adventure, but all things considered "Tarzan the Terrible" is a better example of what would be the typical Burroughs yarn. The eighth book in the Tarzan series, "Tarzan the Terrible" continues the adventure begun in "Tarzan the Untamed" when the Lord of the Jungle discovered the burnt corpse of his wife, Jane after German soldiers visit his African home. ERB never really did like Jane all that much (he though La of Opar would have been a better mate) and killed her off. However, he had no more success in keeping her dead than Arthur Conan Doyle did with killing off Sherlock Holmes, and Tarzan learns that Jane was not murdered by the Germans but kidnapped and sets off in pursuit. Originally published as a seven-part serial in "Argosy All-Story Weekly" in February-March, 1921, "Tarzan the Terrible" continues his private war against the German invaders.
Tarzan has spent two months tracking his mate to Pal-ul-don ("Land of Men"), a hidden valley in Zaire, when he finds a land of strange animals (dinosaurs) and a pair of strange humanoids with tails that he befriends. Ta-den, is a hairless, white skinned, Ho-don warrior, while O-mat is a hairy, black skinned, Waz-don, chief of the tribe of Kor-ul-ja. Of course, in this new world Tarzan becomes a captive but impresses his captors so well that they name him Tarzan-Jad-Guru ("Tarzan the Terrible") because of his skills and accomplishments. Meanwhile, a second visitor comes to Pal-ul-don, wearing only a loin cloth and carrying an Enfield rifle along with a long knife, bow and arrows (think about it). However, it is indeed in Pal-ul-don where Jane is now being held captive, a pawn in a religious power struggle that consumes the rest of the novel as Tarzan tries to rescue her and set things to right in the strange kingdom he has discovered.
"Tarzan the Terrible" has all of the elements you expect from your standard Edgar Rice Burroughs novel. The hero pursues his beloved and has to go through an extended series of fights and escapes to rescue her. Jane does exhibit a bit more spunk this time around (she captures, cleans, and eats a rabbit), so there is an effort to make her more worthy of her jungle mate than before. The religious and social customs of Pal-ul-don are worked out a bit more than we have seen previously in the Tarzan series, which would become more dependent on Tarzan discover more "lost cities" in the interior of darkest Africa with the descendants of Roman legionnaires, crusaders, or whatever. "Tarzan the Terrible" is almost as good as "Tarzan the Untamed," and in many ways represents the end of the glory days of Tarzan. You are only one-third of the way through the series at this point, but after this one the stories get a bit redundant and repetitive as ERB milks his romantic adventure formula for all its worth.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars excellent till the end, January 22, 2006
By 
Jay "SarahsJay" (Douglasville, GA, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Tarzan the Terrible (Paperback)
This book is clearly more experimental for Burroughs in that there are traps the Ape-man can't escape from. Also, the depth of the Ho-don and Waz-don civilizations in Pal-ul-don is well fleshed out and because of this is somewhat reminiscent of the way Burroughs constructed his Martian countries. Too, Korak's last appearance as a major character in a Tarzan novel is well placed if too short. The ultimate failing of the book lies in something Burroughs did all too frequently with his characters be they Tarzan, John Carter, or David Innes: Tarzan doesn't get to exact personal revenge on the men who kidnaped and tried to rape his wife. Had Burroughs not chickened out at the end and given the just reprisal to another character, this would have been the quintessential Tarzan novel. Still, though, it is worth the read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tarzan tracks Jane to the strange land of Pal-ul-don, June 14, 2004
By 
This review is from: Tarzan The Terrible (Paperback)
The original novel "Tarzan of the Apes" is clearly the classic Edgar Rice Burroughs novel and the one you have to read if you read only one ERB pulp fiction adventure, but all things considered "Tarzan the Terrible" is a better example of what would be the typical Burroughs yarn. The eighth book in the Tarzan series, "Tarzan the Terrible" continues the adventure begun in "Tarzan the Untamed" when the Lord of the Jungle discovered the burnt corpse of his wife, Jane after German soldiers visit his African home. ERB never really did like Jane all that much (he though La of Opar would have been a better mate) and killed her off. However, he had no more success in keeping her dead than Arthur Conan Doyle did with killing off Sherlock Holmes, and Tarzan learns that Jane was not murdered by the Germans but kidnapped and sets off in pursuit. Originally published as a seven-part serial in "Argosy All-Story Weekly" in February-March, 1921, "Tarzan the Terrible" continues his private war against the German invaders.
Tarzan has spent two months tracking his mate to Pal-ul-don ("Land of Men"), a hidden valley in Zaire, when he finds a land of strange animals (dinosaurs) and a pair of strange humanoids with tails that he befriends. Ta-den, is a hairless, white skinned, Ho-don warrior, while O-mat is a hairy, black skinned, Waz-don, chief of the tribe of Kor-ul-ja. Of course, in this new world Tarzan becomes a captive but impresses his captors so well that they name him Tarzan-Jad-Guru ("Tarzan the Terrible") because of his skills and accomplishments. Meanwhile, a second visitor comes to Pal-ul-don, wearing only a loin cloth and carrying an Enfield rifle along with a long knife, bow and arrows (think about it). However, it is indeed in Pal-ul-don where Jane is now being held captive, a pawn in a religious power struggle that consumes the rest of the novel as Tarzan tries to rescue her and set things to right in the strange kingdom he has discovered.
"Tarzan the Terrible" has all of the elements you expect from your standard Edgar Rice Burroughs novel. The hero pursues his beloved and has to go through an extended series of fights and escapes to rescue her. Jane does exhibit a bit more spunk this time around (she captures, cleans, and eats a rabbit), so there is an effort to make her more worthy of her jungle mate than before. The religious and social customs of Pal-ul-don are worked out a bit more than we have seen previously in the Tarzan series, which would become more dependent on Tarzan discover more "lost cities" in the interior of darkest Africa with the descendants of Roman legionnaires, crusaders, or whatever. "Tarzan the Terrible" is almost as good as "Tarzan the Untamed," and in many ways represents the end of the glory days of Tarzan. You are only one-third of the way through the series at this point, but after this one the stories get a bit redundant and repetitive as ERB milks his romantic adventure formula for all its worth.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ...brilliantly imagined and tightly plotted..., March 3, 2011
In 1929 Edgar Rice Burroughs recalled thinking:

"...if people were paid for writing rot such as I read in some of those [pulp] magazines, that I could write stories just as rotten. As a matter of fact, although I had never written a story, I knew absolutely that I could write stories just as entertaining and probably a whole lot more so than any I chanced to read in those magazines."

But Burroughs' first Tarzan novel, TARZAN OF THE APES was more than pulp. Burroughs dealt in that novel with themes based on Darwin's theory of evolution. His premise was that breeds of human beings have hereditary characteristics. A noble English lord is a lord. And if he is born and orphaned in a jungle, with no resources, his noble nature will make him a lord even there.

In the novels which followed, (and in the short story collection JUNGLE TALES OF TARZAN) Burroughs developed the character of Tarzan (Lord Greystoke) and showed us his inner conflicts and strengths.

In TARZAN THE TERRIBLE, the eighth of the Tarzan novels, we see no character development. Instead, we follow the fully developed Tarzan through one of Burroughs' most brilliantly imagined and tightly plotted novels. Tarzan seeks his mate, Jane, who has been captured by German forces in a surprise attack on Lord Greystoke's African farm at the beginning of World War I. In this novel, Tarzan has no inner conflict. He is totally clear and focused on his quest to rescue Jane.

In this novel, Burroughs returns to Darwinian themes. Tarzan tracks Jane and her last living captor (Tarzan killed all the others in the preceding novel TARZAN THE UNTAMED), Lieutenant Obergatz, into the heart of the unexplored Congo, where he penetrates a land which has been isolated by natural barriers from the course of outside natural evolution. There he discovers the land of Pal-ul-Don where strange breeds of men with prehensile tails and opposing thumbs on their feet battle with an array of unknown creatures and surviving evolutionary variations. There are saber-toothed lions, sloth-like creatures called Tor-o-dons which seem to be half man and half ape, and meat eating Triceratops'.

Here Tarzan displays great cunning and resourcefulness as he allies with worthy friends and battles evil power-seeking foes in this strange civilization. But even the wily Tarzan falls prey to those enemies who find ways to use against him his single minded desire to save Jane.

In my opinion this is one of the best Tarzan novels, right up there with TARZAN OF THE APES, TARZAN AND THE JEWELS OF OPAR, JUNGLE TALES OF TARZAN, the surprisingly believable TARZAN AND THE ANT MEN, and TARZAN AND THE LOST EMPIRE. No Tarzan fan should miss this one.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ...brilliantly imagined and tightly plotted..., March 3, 2011
This review is from: Tarzan the terrible (Paperback)
In 1929 Edgar Rice Burroughs recalled thinking:

"...if people were paid for writing rot such as I read in some of those [pulp] magazines, that I could write stories just as rotten. As a matter of fact, although I had never written a story, I knew absolutely that I could write stories just as entertaining and probably a whole lot more so than any I chanced to read in those magazines."

But Burroughs' first Tarzan novel, TARZAN OF THE APES was more than pulp. Burroughs dealt in that novel with themes based on Darwin's theory of evolution. His premise was that breeds of human beings have hereditary characteristics. A noble English lord is a lord. And if he is born and orphaned in a jungle, with no resources, his noble nature will make him a lord even there.

In the novels which followed, (and in the short story collection JUNGLE TALES OF TARZAN) Burroughs developed the character of Tarzan (Lord Greystoke) and showed us his inner conflicts and strengths.

In TARZAN THE TERRIBLE, the eighth of the Tarzan novels, we see no character development. Instead, we follow the fully developed Tarzan through one of Burroughs' most brilliantly imagined and tightly plotted novels. Tarzan seeks his mate, Jane, who has been captured by German forces in a surprise attack on Lord Greystoke's African farm at the beginning of World War I. In this novel, Tarzan has no inner conflict. He is totally clear and focused on his quest to rescue Jane.

In this novel, Burroughs returns to Darwinian themes. Tarzan tracks Jane and her last living captor (Tarzan killed all the others in the preceding novel TARZAN THE UNTAMED), Lieutenant Obergatz, into the heart of the unexplored Congo, where he penetrates a land which has been isolated by natural barriers from the course of outside natural evolution. There he discovers the land of Pal-ul-Don where strange breeds of men with prehensile tails and opposing thumbs on their feet battle with an array of unknown creatures and surviving evolutionary variations. There are saber-toothed lions, sloth-like creatures called Tor-o-dons which seem to be half man and half ape, and meat eating Triceratops'.

Here Tarzan displays great cunning and resourcefulness as he allies with worthy friends and battles evil power-seeking foes in this strange civilization. But even the wily Tarzan falls prey to those enemies who find ways to use against him his single minded desire to save Jane.

In my opinion this is one of the best Tarzan novels, right up there with TARZAN OF THE APES, TARZAN AND THE JEWELS OF OPAR, JUNGLE TALES OF TARZAN, the surprisingly believable TARZAN AND THE ANT MEN, and TARZAN AND THE LOST EMPIRE. No Tarzan fan should miss this one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Superb Tarzan, May 15, 2013
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It blows my mind that I can read so many novels in a row by ERB and never once tire of him.

Every book in this 24 volume series is a masterpiece in its own. I highly recommend them all! I cannot say anything bad about any one if the Tarzan books and I am looking forward to reading all 24 consecutively.
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5.0 out of 5 stars fascinating, June 22, 2014
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Love the pace of these stories you can barely keep up no matter how fast you read. Once again Tarzan finds his mate and is tracked by his nearly equally savagely hearted son.....long live Tarzan of the apes
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5.0 out of 5 stars An Awesome Read!, May 13, 2014
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This book is thoroughly entertaining. Borroughs imagination had no boundaries or fears. I would recommend this book to young and adult readers alike
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3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent entry in the Tarzan chronicles, March 26, 2014
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The writing and editing is a bit rough compared to some of E R. Burroughs' other work, but still an enjoyable romp through savage wilderness with the peerless Tarzan.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tarzan in yet another time-lost clime, February 15, 2014
Tarzan visits lost cities in uncharted Africa in half of the 24 authorized Burroughs novels and, on occasion, he revisits the same place. Unless I've missed one, he goes to Opar four times, always a party in the ape man's loincloth vis-à-vis La's repeated schemes. Twice he swings by Cathne and Athne, the Cities of Gold and Ivory respectively, where another lonely queen/priestess/empress entertains designs to compromise Tarzan's determined Victorian values. Other exciting ports of call on the lord of the jungle's map include sister cities Castra Sanginarius and Castrum Mare; Xuja, in the valley of Luna; the ant men's civilization within a thorn barrier; and other bizarre locales.

Opar is an absolute blast however my hands-down favorite party town in Africa has to be Pal-ul-don, where our hero spends most of his time in TARZAN THE TERRIBLE, Tarzan-jad-guru in the Pal-ul-donian lingua franca. Refreshingly absent from the cast in this book is the female ruler lusting after Lady Greystoke's hubbie. Out of all the time-lost civilizations Tarzan stumbles upon, Pal-ul-don is the closest Burroughs came to transplanting a Martian city on the African continent. Pal-ul-don doesn't have origins on Mars but it might as well, everything about it is fantasy: cliff-dwelling colorfully-skinned tailed humans and equally multi-hued dinosaurs.

By the time this book was published Burroughs had been a professional writer for seven or eight years, still full of fire and very much on top of his narrative game. TARZAN THE TERRIBLE is one of the very best Tarzan novels, lodged second in the finest story arc Burroughs ever imagined for the ape man. That arc stretches over four books and in every one Tarzan travels to a lost city: Xuja in Tarzan the Untamed, Pal-ul-don in TARZAN THE TERRIBLE, Opar in Tarzan & the Golden Lion and the ant colonies in Tarzan & the Ant Men. Like the first four Tarzan novels, these four books can be read as one long story because they are so closely interrelated.

The lost city device in TARZAN THE TERRIBLE wasn't too formulaic in Burroughs' Tarzan series (yet) as the arc is depicted in earlier novels, the seventh through tenth. Lost cities remained a staple but captivating formula when Burroughs again relied on it in the eleventh and twelfth Tarzan volumes. After besting so many lions and bull apes a jungle lord must look for new challenges and this applies especially to his creator as well; lost cities run riot with them. In the thirteenth Tarzan novel Burroughs basically reused the device once more by taking Lord Greystoke to Pellucidar, a lost land but not a lost city in Africa.

No worries, it's as solid a fictional vehicle when employed by ERB as it was when, more than a decade later, Robert E. Howard took Conan to numerous lost cities in the pulps.
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Tarzan the Terrible
Tarzan the Terrible by Edgar Rice Burroughs (Paperback - October 10, 2013)
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