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Tascam DR07 Portable Digital Recorder

by Tascam
| 4 answered questions

Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
  • Built-in Stereo Electret Condenser Microphone
  • Records to SD or SD-HC Card Media
  • 2GB SD Card Included
  • USB 2.0 Jack for Transferring Files
  • 3.5mm Stereo Mic Input

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Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 1.1 x 2.2 x 5.3 inches ; 4.5 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Shipping: This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
  • ASIN: B001QJOI8E
  • Item model number: DR07
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (89 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #28,292 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: January 23, 2009

Product Description

Amazon.com

TASCAM's DR-07 brings portable digital recording to an even smaller, more affordable package. A pair of highly-sensitive built in mics captures a wide stereo image, recording in either MP3 or 16/24-bit WAV format. The DR-07 is powered by AA batteries and it transfers files to a computer using a high-speed USB 2.0 connection. The versatile recorder even includes a windscreen, tripod stand mount and 2GB SD card to start recording right away.

Portable digital recording in an even smaller, more affordable package. Click to enlarge.

Stereo electret condenser mics for high-sensitivity recordings, plus an external mic input.

Adjustable mic level and line input.

Musicians will appreciate the playback functions of the DR-07, including the ability to loop MP3s and slow them down without changing the pitch. External microphones and sources can be recorded through the mic/line input, and the recorder offers analog limiting, low cut and auto gain setting for great-sounding audio. But for great-sounding recordings, the compact DR-07 is all you need.

Built-in Mic
The DR-07 features a pair of built-in stereo electret condenser mics, for instant, high-sensitivity stereo recordings. Thanks to the adjustable input level, it's a great choice for quiet or loud applications, from simple songwriting with a guitar to recording a metal band rehearsal.

SD and SD-HC Support
Record to SD cards (including the included 2GB card) or add a little more recording time with high-capacity SD-HC cards up to 32GB.

Simple File Transfer
Using the USB 2.0 jack, file transfer is a breeze. Simply connect to your PC and drag-and-drop.

Mic/Line Input
Use an external microphone or line input device using the 3.5mm line and mic inputs.

The 3.5mm line output works with headphones or for sending to stereos/monitors/etc.

Keep It Clean
The DR-07 has plenty of features to ensure your audio doesn't end up a distorted mess. The switchable low cut filter helps avoid rumble during field applications or recording bass-heavy material, the analog limiter keeps the dynamics in check, and the auto gain setting helps avoid preamp distortion from the get-go.

MP3 or WAV Recording
The DR-07 writes WAV files at 44.1 or 48kHz, 16 or 24-bit formats. But you don't always need that for a scratch practice recording, grabbing an interview or lecture, etc. MP3 file recording lets you record directly to MP3 format, from 32kbps to 320 kbps, thus saving you a wealth of space on that SD card.

Variable-Speed Audition
Slow down playback without changing the pitch--handy for learning or studying passages, transcribing interviews, or other uses.

Ultra-Portable
The DR-07 is ready to go anywhere, since it's powered by two AA batteries (you can add the optional PS-P520 power adapter to power from a wall outlet).

It weighs just 4.4 ounces--with batteries--and is 2.2 x 5.3 x 1.1 inches in size.

What's in the Box
TASCAM DR-07, 2GB SD Card, USB Cable, AA Battery, Windscreen, Owner's Manual, Warranty Card

Product Description

TASCAM's DR-07 brings portable digital recording to an even smaller, more affordable package. A pair of highly-sensitive built in mics captures a wide stereo image, recording in either MP3 or 16/24-bit WAV format. The DR-07 is powered by AA batteries and it transfers files to a computer using a high-speed USB 2.0 connection. The versatile recorder even includes a windscreen, tripod stand mount and 2GB SD card to start recording right away.

Musicians will appreciate the playback functions of the DR-07, including the ability to loop MP3s and slow them down without changing the pitch. External microphones and sources can be recorded through the mic/line input, and the recorder offers analog limiting, low cut and auto gain setting for great-sounding audio. But for great-sounding recordings, the compact DR-07 is all you need.



Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

The Tascam warranty is for 90 days on labor.
Franklin C. Schwartz
I finally have this fine little solid state recorder in my hands, and I must say it does nearly anything I could want from it.
oldpink
It's easy to use and the recordings sound great.
MacSteebee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

114 of 114 people found the following review helpful By S. Hartman on May 4, 2009
I just returned mine. Simply put, its a great little product, and for $175 you just can't find a better value. But you get what you pay for, and you get a nice little recording device, perfect for most applications, epically recording musical ideas while away from the studio. However, for low level recordings such as acoustic guitar, look closer at the Sony PCM-D50, that's what I'm switching to for my use. Here are my pros and cons of the DR07:

pros:
great price ($175 guitar center)
small
light weight
records any combination of 16/24bit 44.1k/48k sample rate
has built in mics
very easy to use
takes SD cards to expand recording time.
records either mp3 or wave files.
sound is directional, and records the best from directly in front.
Comes with a wind screen.
Takes AA batteries, easy to find and use.

cons:
Mic pre-amps are VERY noisy: when recording an interview or acoustic guitar, you can hear the hiss through it... lots of hiss on low volume recordings like that.
Lots of handling noise (more on that below),
NO Speaker! So you have to bring headphones to check your recordings.
The windscreen looks and feels cheap, its just a piece of shipping foam cut out to fit on top.
Buttons feel cheap,
memory card and USB access door feels cheap, I'm sure after a short while of use, it will break off.

Handling noise: any slight touch of the unit make a loud sound when using on-board mics, Poor quality limiter: the limiter cuts back so hard that when you just touch the unit, or get a loud pop from your voice, it cuts all the way down to zero, and then back up, so you get this very dramatic but short cut out of sound. Its very annoying.
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65 of 65 people found the following review helpful By oldpink on March 26, 2009
Verified Purchase
I finally have this fine little solid state recorder in my hands, and I must say it does nearly anything I could want from it.
Sound quality, especially using the 44.1KHz/48KHz and WAV16bit/WAV24bit settings, is as good as you can get without having to fork over considerably more for something more professional grade, such as the Sony PCMD50 (~$500) or a far more expensive device (sorry, forgot the name) that costs $1,500USD.
As expected, the integral microphones are decent for recording up close, but I would definitely recommend using an external for recording bands, lecture halls, or other roomy areas where the sound source may be some distance from the unit.
That is also where this little gadget really shows its stuff, as it is configurable for condenser microphones that require a powered (think "phantom" power) jack, dynamic microphones that have their own power source (I have an Audio Technica stereo mike that uses a single AA battery to operate), and even a line in jack for recording from a mixing desk or other device with a line out jack.
You can even slow down or speed up the recordings after they are made, with no pitch change, although I did notice that the slowed recordings exhibited noticeable artifacting at the slower settings, but that is no real problem, as that feature is mainly a musician's tool for learning how to play a fast or complicated part, NOT for listening enjoyment.
The 2GB SD card that it comes with almost has the full capability of file size that this unit can handle, which is 2GB, or ~3hours and 24minutes when recording 44.1KHz/16-bit.
The 2GB card holds just over 3 hours, so anyone wanting to max out the recording file size limit will need a 4GB card.
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70 of 72 people found the following review helpful By MacSteebee on February 7, 2009
Verified Purchase
The DR-07 does everything Tascam claims and more. It's easy to use and the recordings sound great. Used it the day it arrived to record an entire 5-hour band rehearsal. Setting it up was simply a matter of putting it on a music stand across the room and pressing REC. I never had to touch it again for 5 hours. The stereo 128K MP3 audio quality was fine and the resulting 5-hour file used only about 300MB of the 2GB (2,000MB) SD card that came with the DR-07. Took it home after rehearsal and quickly transferred the MP3 to my laptop where I sliced and diced the recording into individual song files with CoolEdit 2000. At last there is an easy way to remember how we played it at rehearsal and do a quick review before the gig. This thing is a must for an aging rocker.

Other great musician features include:
- adjust tempo without affecting pitch
- adjust pitch (in half steps) without affecting tempo
- fine tune pitch (cents) without affecting tempo
- quickly mark a phrase (short or long) and loop playback infinitely
- use line-in for quick and easy board tapes
- camera style tripod mount

It lived up to Tascam's claim of 7.5 hours on two AA's. That may seem like a long time but I'm probably going to do the planet a favor and buy the AC adapter. I'd also like to find a reasonably priced carrying case to keep the display from getting scratched up in my gig bag.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By R. Iredale on June 7, 2009
Verified Purchase
I shoot documentaries in HDV widescreen and with surround sound. For surround, I use the tape to record the front two audio channels from a Sony stereo microphone. For the rear two channels, for the past few years I've used a Sharp Minidisc recorder mounted on the rear of the camera, fed from an identical Sony stereo microphone facing rearward. The rig has worked great.

But the Sharp Minidisc recorders, reliable as they have been, are mechanical, with spinning disks and moving heads. It was time to move up to solid-state.

I looked at a variety of compact flash-memory recorders. Prices ranged from $175 to $500. I decided to get my feet wet with a unit at the lower end of the range, and narrowed my search down to the Zoom H2 and the Tascam DR-07.

The Zoom unit looked and felt delicate, though reviews on this site and elsewhere were positive. Still, when I got my hands on the Tascam it was "Game Over" for me. The unit looks classy and well-built, the menus are expansive, the audio quality is first-rate, and even the external mic preamps are just as quiet as the ones in the Sharp Minidisc units (and the noise level when driven by an Audio-Technica AT-822 for serious choral recording is plenty low enough to be masked by hall ambiance).

Two AA cells run the thing for many hours, and Enerloop rechargeables will no doubt increase that by 50%. No proprietary flat rechargeables for me, thanks. Pushbuttons are first-rate, and are not the Zoom's membrane type.

Connect the thing to your PC with a standard USB cable, and it shows up as just another hard drive. Drag and drop your files to or from the unit. And they transfer fast--a one hour wav (~700MB) took about 2 minutes.
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