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A Taste of Heaven: Worship in the Light of Eternity Hardcover – September 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 173 pages
  • Publisher: Reformation Trust Publishing (September 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1567690769
  • ISBN-13: 978-1567690767
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,335,827 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dr. R.C. Sproul is founder and chairman of Ligonier Ministries, an international Christian education ministry located near Orlando, Fla. He is also co-pastor of Saint Andrew's Chapel in Sanford, Fla., chancellor of Reformation Bible College, and executive editor of Tabletalk magazine. He can be heard on the radio program Renewing Your Mind, which is broadcast on hundreds of radio outlets in the United States and around the world, and on RefNet 24-hour Christian internet radio. Dr. Sproul has contributed dozens of articles to national evangelical publications, has spoken at conferences, churches, and schools around the world, and has written more than ninety books, including The Holiness of God, Faith Alone, and Everyone's a Theologian. He also serves as general editor of The Reformation Study Bible.

Customer Reviews

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I guess thats a sign of a good book is that it makes you think and keeps you testing its conclusions.
Grant Marshall
Only when we understand that worship is an encounter with the risen Christ will ours hearts be set ablaze.
Joshua Gelatt
Dr. Sproul goes through great lengths to describe baptism as a sign or seal to the New Testament covenant.
Philip S Roeda

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By T. Stevenson on March 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent book on worhsip. Sproul stresses the importance of the use of the 5 senses in worship. it is also a solid apologetic on infant baptism and he makes a great appeal for the use of wine in the Lord's supper. This book will unfortuntley fall on deaf ears, but happy is the church that follows his suggestions.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By kevin on June 10, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is another great work by R.C. Sproul. He share with me some views i had not previously thought much about and showed through this book the involvement of God in everthing. I especially loved how he connects the old testament with the new to show us our current application of biblical principles. Thanks R.C.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Philip S Roeda on March 22, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Sproul goes through great lengths to describe baptism as a sign or seal to the New Testament covenant. As Circumcision was a sign or seal to the Old Testament covenant, Baptism is a sign or seal to the New Testament covenant. The author does a fair job describing the counter argument to believers Baptism. Dr. Sproul argues that Baptism is assign of coming to the Family of God; actual belief is a realization of this fact. I disagree; I believe that a person needs an actual knowledge and belief to be identified with God's Kingdom. The author goes through great lengths in describing the difference between a sign and symbol. A sign points to the actual fact whereas a symbol represents the actual thing. Symbolism is not to be confused with mere symbolism or activity that does not reflect the actual glory of God and His great acts.
Dr. Sproul goes to great length to identify worship with the God described in the Bible. If one accepts the idea the Bible is God's word then what the Bible teaches about worship should be prescribed in God's Church. TH e words of the Bible should take precedence over personal taste, enjoyment or fulfillment. Worship is not about oneself. This should not be confused that worship should only touch the cerebral. Yes worship service should provoke thought, understanding about whom God is and the works of God. Pure knowledge of these things should provoke an emotional response. That does not mean that the form, the organization of the service, worship surroundings, and actual activity of the service cannot form additional emotion about God and His great deeds. R.C. Sproul argues the Old Testament worship as prescribed about the Old Testament did this and some of it can be used enlighten us about worship in the New Testament Church.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Erik Raymond on February 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover
"If God himself were to design worship, what would it look like?" This is the question that Dr R.C. Sproul asks and endeavors to answer in his book A Taste of Heaven: Worship in the Light of Eternity.

I think he did a pretty good job. The book is short (172 pages, 8' x 5.5') but don't let the size make you think it is a paper weight. Consistent with his reputation, Sproul gives you a lot to chew on in small, managable bites. It's good.

Sproul's sounds as if he walked into a typical evangelical church's pastoral meeting and asked, "Hey, have you guys ever thought about what God wants?" From there he is so thoughtful, compassionate, and refreshingly biblical.

Sproul's strength is that he drives everything back to the Scripture. God rules his people through his word. Therefore, Christians love the Bible! This heart cry of the Reformation is the cry of the Bible and should be of every Christian.

He covers reoccuring principles and patterns throughout redemptive history. He shows how God has always employed our senses and minds in our worship of him. He takes us to a wandering nation out of Egypt. He takes us to Jerusalem. He takes us to Geneva. He takes us to Florida. And throughout this guided tour through biblical and church history, Sproul makes us think and interact with the Scriptures.

He also spends considerable time (3 chapters) talking about baptism. Of course Sproul is a Presbyterian and staunch advocate of paedo-baptism. I found this ironic when I noticed that he dedicated the book to John MacArthur (Sproul and MacArthur have publicaly debated infant baptism). If you disagree with Sproul, don't get hung up on this; there is more than enough to help you in your appreciation of private and corporate worship.

The best thing I can say about the book is that it makes you anticipate and appreciate the Lord's Day gathering of the church. It is a very helpful resource.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Matthew R. Kuiper VINE VOICE on August 29, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Introduction:

A Taste of Heaven was written by Sproul in order to foster in our churches what is proper worship. His fear is that churches have merged far to much into our Sunday what is secular rather than that which is spiritual. Secular worship to the Father is improper worship and according to Isaiah a waste of breath. Sproul's desire is that churches and individuals may engage in worship that is honoring to God.

Body: The bases that Sproul works off for his text is his belief on liturgy. The doctor writes in his text that during seminary he came to the conclusion that in the debate over worship he sided with the liturgy style of the priests, rather than the prophets. The argument is that in the books of the prophets, the prophets hold to that the form does not matter, rather the heart is the important part. This would mean that a person could worship in whatever way he found appropriate as long as his heart was right. However, Sproul's argument is that the prophets were not negating the liturgical style that God established through the priest, but rather showing the people that the style was worthless without the right kind of heart. Therefore, Sproul argues that we still need to pay attention to what principles God set in place in the Old Testament worship method. He admits that a Christian needs to be careful as he enters the Old Testament to discover how he should live so he does not fall into pharisaical tendencies, but that does not remove the necessity of such an endeavor.

R.C. Sproul argues that worship begins by giving of ourselves in full entirety to God. He quotes Romans 12:1-2 and concludes that God plays for keeps. This is the essence of worship and must proceed the form.
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