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Taste of War Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Allen Lane
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0713999640
  • ISBN-13: 978-0713999648
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,076,373 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
This is a very impressive, very well researched and very well written book, describing the World War II from a perspective very little treated. Although quite familiar with this period of history, I nevertheless learned a lot and saw many things I knew in a completely new light.

Ms Collingham described in her book the policies of production, distribution and consumption of food from 1939 to 1945 in five main fighting powers: United States, United Kingdom, Soviet Union, Third Reich and Japan. Her writing is excellent and this book is as easy to read as if it was a novel. She describes with great precision the deadly "hunger exportation" to the East by the Third Reich in order to feed German population and the huge armed forces. Even more incredible chapter is devoted to Japan, whose leaders didn't hesitate to risk the starvation of their own soldiers in the most distant campigns (Burma, New Guinea). Hunger in Soviet Union is also described thanks to the effort of research, including sources known since long time ago, but left untreated. Finally, the much more succesful approach of the British and especially the war time boom of farming in United States bring some light in this otherwise extremely shocking and dark story.

Other than the amount of new information I was particularly impressed by the care for details, including the writing of names of people and towns. Being Polish, I couldn't help but notice that in most British and American publications names in Polish are almost always misspelled, even if they are not particularly difficult. In this book, when areas in Nazi occupied Poland are described, I couldn't find even one single error, not even when the good town of Szczebrzeszyn was mentioned - and with this name even we Poles have a lot of trouble...
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By Mike Swan on May 7, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A very good book. A must read for history buffs. Details more reasons for the horror of WWII. Actually, everyone should read this book. It may apply to some of today's political moves.
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Format: Hardcover
This book is a tribute to how food historians can change the way we see history, much the way "new social history" writers (like me) did back in the 1970s. Collingham is an excellent writer. The book would be a page-turner if the subject matter weren't so grizzly.Although the book is emotionally tough to read, it offers new insight into the disgusting thinking behind the Holocaust gas chambers(depicted as a Nazi strategy to cut back on the time it took to starve people to death) and a fresh rethink of what lay behind Japanese and German expansion strategies -- the desire to have an agrarian hinterland much like the US enjoyed. The book is very thorough and well-researched. I only wish it had been a bit more explicit in linking the horrors of World War 11 to the idealism around the UN's 1945 Food and Agriculture Organization and the 1948 human rights declaration, which identified food as a human right -- both subjects that I will review in the reissue of my little book on world food systems. But I am delighted that this book bodes so well for bringing food studies perspectivesinto the writing of history.--wayne roberts
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael D. Markovitch on April 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Excellent book. Well worth reading. Breaks some new ground, which can be hard to do regarding World War II. Saw a few minor errors, but nothing earthshaking. While this book was written for a British audience, there is plenty of great information here and the book would be a valuable addition to the collection of anyone interested in history.
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